News, Culture & Society

The latest from Rich McCor who remodels landscapes with paper cut-outs are as brilliant as ever

It seems that Rich McCor’s imagination knows no limits.

He’s the London-based paper artist and photographer who creates intricate cut-outs to re-imagine landscapes around the world.

And his latest work is as brilliant as ever. MailOnline first reported on his work in 2015 – and he’s still producing superbly crafted scenes, as these images show.

In a tourist hotspot far, far away… A church in Iceland becomes a Star Wars stormtrooper

It's black and white - it seems that Rich McCor’s imagination knows no limits

It’s black and white – it seems that Rich McCor’s imagination knows no limits

MailOnline first reported on Mr McCor's work in 2015 – and he’s still producing superbly crafted scenes

MailOnline first reported on Mr McCor’s work in 2015 – and he’s still producing superbly crafted scenes

McCor first started transforming landmarks as a way to explore London and look at the world from a different perspective. This scene was created in Wellington, New Zealand

McCor first started transforming landmarks as a way to explore London and look at the world from a different perspective. This scene was created in Wellington, New Zealand

McCor brilliantly re-imagines the Arc de Triomphe as a Lego character

A building block in Barcelona becomes Jessica Rabbit

McCor brilliantly re-imagines the Arc de Triomphe as a Lego character (left). On the right a building block in Barcelona becomes Jessica Rabbit

The 31-year-old, also known as paperboyo, first started transforming landmarks as a way to explore London and look at the world from a different perspective.

He said: ‘It occurred to me one day that despite living in the city for a while, I was mostly only exploring the area between where I lived and where I worked.

‘One evening I went to Big Ben and I remember looking to my left and seeing four photographers and another four on my right and I thought to myself ‘we’re all taking exactly the same photo. What can I do differently?’

Mr McCor spends hours researching the destinations he photographs looking for the right architecture and landmarks

Mr McCor spends hours researching the destinations he photographs looking for the right architecture and landmarks

When McCor looked at this building, he saw its potential to become a catapault

When McCor looked at this building, he saw its potential to become a catapault

Game on: Easter Island becomes a game of table football in the hands of McCor

Game on: Easter Island becomes a game of table football in the hands of McCor

Mr McCor spends hours researching the destinations he photographs looking for the right architecture and landmarks.

He said: ‘I still pack my tools in case I get hit with inspiration on the spot and can head into a coffee shop to cut out a new design.’

The photographer-turned-artist said it takes him 15 to 20 minutes to make each cut-out.

The nefarious Mr Burns from the hit animated show The Simpsons springs up from a reindeer

There be dragons in New Zealand

The nefarious Mr Burns from the hit animated show The Simpsons springs up from a reindeer (left) in Lapland. There be dragons (right) in New Zealand

McCor said: 'My mind is clear when I’m cutting the delicate details so it’s... my daily dose of meditation’

McCor said: ‘My mind is clear when I’m cutting the delicate details so it’s… my daily dose of meditation’

A coffee cup is transformed into a prop for a battle between a dragon and a warrior

A pink umbrella becomes a flamingo at Sugar Beach in Toronto

Rich said that he doesn’t tend to post photos of himself on Instagram but he does get recognised occasionally when people see him holding up the cut-outs in front of his camera. On the left is a coffee cup transformed into a prop for a battle between a dragon and a warrior. On the right, a pink umbrella becomes a flamingo at Sugar Beach in Toronto

Although having more than half a million followers on Instagram because of his art skills, McCor still prefers to call himself a photographer

Although having more than half a million followers on Instagram because of his art skills, McCor still prefers to call himself a photographer

He said: ‘It’s therapeutic too. My mind is clear when I’m cutting the delicate details so it’s also my daily dose of meditation.’

Although having more than half a million followers on Instagram because of his art skills, McCor still prefers to call himself a photographer.

He said: ‘It makes me laugh that people call me an artist because I was c**p at art in school.

‘Someone once described me as a “non-destructive vandal”, which I like.’ 

McCor said: ‘It makes me laugh that people call me an artist because I was c**p at art in school'

McCor said: ‘It makes me laugh that people call me an artist because I was c**p at art in school’

‘Someone once described me as a "non-destructive vandal", which I like,' McCor said

A brilliant Yo-yo scene created on Santa Monica Beach

‘Someone once described me as a “non-destructive vandal”, which I like,’ McCor said. On the right is a brilliant Yo-yo scene created on Santa Monica Beach

 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


Comments are closed.