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The VERY surprising things a dentist can tell about you by looking at your teeth

What do YOUR teeth say about you? The surprising things a dentist can tell about you in seconds – from which hand you write with to anxiety levels

  • Dentist know if patients smoke, are pregnant and the hand they use to write with
  • Dr Luke Cronin said the state of someone’s teeth says a lot about a person  
  • Less enamel on the teeth also could indicate the person drinks lemon water  


Dentists can tell if you’re anxious, left or right-handed or pregnant simply by looking at your teeth.

Dr Luke Cronin, a Sydney dentist and clinical adviser IQ Active Aligners, told Daily Mail Australia the state of someone’s teeth says a lot about a person and their lifestyle habits.

Cracked teeth could indicate stress and less enamel could indicate you drink lemon water every morning – a trendy habit that does nothing for your dental health.

Dr Luke Cronin, a Sydney dentist and Clinical Adviser IQ Active Aligners, (pictured) told Daily Mail Australia the state of someone’s teeth says a lot about a person and their lifestyle habits

Yellow teeth stains indicate someone smokes while cracked teeth could indicate stress and less enamel could indicate you drink lemon water (stock image)

Yellow teeth stains indicate someone smokes while cracked teeth could indicate stress and less enamel could indicate you drink lemon water (stock image) 

If you’re left or right-handed

A dentist can detect habits and determine which is your dominant hand by glancing over your teeth.

‘For people with average to poor oral hygiene habits, the dentist will notice more plaque on their dominant side,’ Dr Cronin said.

For instance, those who are right-handed will brush the left side of their mouth better than their right side, resulting in more plaque on one side. 

'Aside from the smell you can tell a patient is a smoker by the stained teeth and plaque and often periodontal disease (gum disease),' Dr Cronin said (stock image)

‘Aside from the smell you can tell a patient is a smoker by the stained teeth and plaque and often periodontal disease (gum disease),’ Dr Cronin said (stock image)

You drink lemon water

Surprisingly, dentists can also notice if someone drinks lemon water as the acidity from the citrus dissolves the coating on the teeth.

‘If you drink lemon water regularly it will cause erosion of the front surfaces of the teeth where the enamel has dissolved,’ Dr Cronin explained, adding how this is ‘permanent and unsightly’.

‘The same thing happens to the inside of the teeth from stomach acid with people who are bulimic or have acid reflux.’

If you’re pregnant

Dr Cronin explained how pregnant women experience an increase in hormones, boosting blood flow to the gums. 

‘Often the gums of pregnant women will bleed more than you would expect from the amount of plaque that is present,’ Dr Cronin said. 

Chewing on pens or clenching your jaw down when you're stressed is known to have a bad impact on your teeth

If you used to suck your thumb during your childhood, this may have pushed your front teeth forward resulting in a narrow upper jaw

Chewing on pens or clenching your jaw down when you’re stressed is known to have a bad impact on your teeth. To prevent this, mouth guards can be worn while you sleep

If you’re anxious or stressed

Chewing on pens or clenching your jaw down when you’re stressed is known to have a bad impact on your teeth.

Dr Cronin said dentists can easily tell you’re anxious or stressed more often as this causes the teeth to become worn down, fractured or cracked.

To prevent this, mouth guards can be worn while you sleep.

If you used to suck your thumb as a child 

If you used to suck your thumb during your childhood, this may have pushed your front teeth forward resulting in a narrow upper jaw.

To correct this, braces may be required.

If you’re a smoker

Smoking is known to leave a yellow stain on your teeth and is a key indicator to dentist that you’re a smoker. 

‘Aside from the smell, you can tell a patient is a smoker by the stained teeth and plaque and often periodontal disease (gum disease),’ Dr Cronin said.

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Read more at DailyMail.co.uk