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Three women given ‘G-spotplasty’ are now able to orgasm

Three women given surgery to heighten the sensitivity of their G-spot are now able to orgasm through sex.

Like millions of other women around the world, all of the unidentified patients were unable to orgasm through vaginal penetration alone.

But after undergoing a procedure by the same gynaecologist who found the elusive G-spot, their ability to climax through sex returned.

The results of the operation, now named as a ‘G-spotplasty’, have just been published in a scientific journal.

Dr Adam Ostrzenski (centre) removed a small, diamond-shaped piece of tissue from the supposed location of each of the women’s G-spots (pictured on The View in 2012)

Dr Adam Ostrzenski, a gynaecological surgeon from Florida, was behind the surgery, which took place five years ago.

He removed a small, diamond-shaped piece of tissue from the supposed location of each of the women’s G-spots, NewScientist reports. This allowed for the tightening of their vaginal walls.

The three women each complained of not being able to achieve through vaginal penetration following childbirth – a common complaint.  

Dr Ostrzenski, from the Institute of Gynecology in St Petersburg, asked the women to record their sexual experiences over the next of five years to determine if the procedure was successful.

‘Very pleased’ 

And the results, which showed the women were all ‘very pleased’ with the surgery, were published in the journal Aesthetic Plastic Surgery.

Like millions of other women around the world, all of the unidentified patients were unable to orgasm through vaginal penetration alone

Like millions of other women around the world, all of the unidentified patients were unable to orgasm through vaginal penetration alone

WHAT IS THE G SPOT?

The G-spot was named after German gynaecologist Ernst Gräfenberg, who first noted the area was particularly sensitive to touch in 1950.

The spot, which is thought to measure slightly more than half an inch in diameter, was not known as the G-spot until 1981, however. 

The existence of the G-spot has caused both fascination and frustration since its existence was first mooted more than 60 years ago. 

Many scientists and doctors have doubted whether it is real, with a study in 2010 concluding it was merely a figment of women’s imagination.

But Dr Ostrzenski claimed to have proved the G-spot really did exist in 2012 – after stumbling across the elusive zone during a post-mortem examination. 

Writing in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, he said it measured a meagre 8.1mm by 3.6mm by 1.5mm, which led many to joke about why it was so difficult to find.

Each of the women also admitted they were having more sex after the procedure. 

Welcomed by experts 

Douglas McGeorge, consultant plastic surgeon and former president of the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons, welcomed the trial.

He told NewScientist: ‘A lot of women get a pleasurable experience as a result of stimulating the area some people call the G spot. 

‘If they’re suddenly not achieving this same satisfaction and they feel it is a problem, then a small procedure like this might help them. And that has to be a good thing.’

However, experts have today slammed the procedure, which makes women believe problems achieving orgasms through vaginal penetration is ‘pathological’. 

Dr Devan Stahl, of Michigan State University, argued there is ‘virtually no evidence’ therapies promising women an increased sexual pleasure work.

How many women can’t climax through sex? 

The results of the ‘G-spotplasty’ come after an Indiana University study last year revealed four out of five women can’t climax through sexual intercourse alone. 

The existence of the G-spot has caused both fascination and frustration since its existence was first mooted more than 60 years ago. 

Many scientists and doctors have doubted whether it is real, with a study in 2010 concluding it was merely a figment of women’s imagination.

But Dr Ostrzenski claimed to have proved the G-spot really did exist in 2012 – after stumbling across the elusive zone during a post-mortem examination. 

Writing in the Journal of Sexual Medicine, he said it measured a meagre 8.1mm by 3.6mm by 1.5mm, which led many to joke about why it was so difficult to find.



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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