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‘Trigger warning’ device for classrooms and parties sounds alarm when it detects offensive language

Would you buy a political correctness police-bot? ‘Trigger warning’ device for classrooms and parties sounds alarm when it detects offensive language or jokes 

  • Themis emits loud and irritating noises when it detects offensive language used
  • The lamp-sized device is currently being trialled in classrooms and universities
  • The trigger warning detector was unveiled by Zinah Issa at Dubai Design Week 


A new trigger-warning detector which sound alarms when it detects offensive speech has been unveiled at Dubai Design Week.

The Themis is a lamp-sized device intended to ‘moderate’ debate in classrooms and universities and ‘manifest political correctness’ into a product.

The small device could even be used to police language at dinner parties and family gatherings and its developers have said it hopes that Themis will encourage ‘self-critique’.

The Themis will emit irritating sounds when it detects offensive speech has been said around it

Zinah Issa, who unveiled the device in Dubai, told The Telegraph: ‘Through the use of speech recognition and sound sensors we were able to program Themis to detect offensive terms – racial slurs, offensive jokes – through the microphone.

‘Extremely bothersome alarms last approximately two minutes, after which Themis turns off, allowing an open, understanding discussion among people on the possible trigger matter and the potential reasons behind Themis’s activation’.

The device is named for Themis, the Greek goddess of justice and social order. 

Themis is currently being trialled for use in classrooms and universities to 'moderate' debate

Themis is currently being trialled for use in classrooms and universities to ‘moderate’ debate

Themis is being currently trialled in classrooms and universities with a view to a wider roll-out soon.

The design were unveiled at the Global Grad Show where students from across the Middle East and North Africa were invited to share their work.

The show, which takes place annually at the Dubai Design Week festival, was moved online this year due to the pandemic.

The graduate portion of the festival concluded yesterday. 

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Read more at DailyMail.co.uk