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Two men, 64 and 69, escape burning plane

Two men, 64 and 69, escape with their lives as their airplane bursts into flames after an emergency landing

  • A two-seater Jabiru aircraft started emitting smoke 250m in the air 
  • The pilot, 64, and his passenger, 69, made a emergency return to the airport
  • The aircraft landed at Wagga Wagga Airport and two men managed to escape
  • Shortly after they escaped, the small aircraft burst into flames  

Two men made a lucky escape after their recreational aircraft was destroyed after it caught fire mid-air and made an emergency landing at Wagga Wagga Airport. 

The two-seater Jabiru had taken off about 2.10pm and was 250m in the air when the pilot, 64, and the passenger, 69, smelt smoke.   

They banked left and returned to the airport where they managed to escape the aircraft before it burst into flames. 

Both men sustained minor injuries and were treated on the scene. 

The two-seater Jabiru had taken off about 2.10pm and was 250m in the air when the pilot, 64, and the passenger, 69, smelt smoke

Chad Kennis from Fire and Rescue NSW arrived at the crash sight shortly after the aircraft made its emergency landing. 

‘I don’t know how the fire started,’ Mr Kennis told 7NEWS.  

‘By the time we arrived, the people had self-evacuated with only very minor injuries and were being seen to by the ambulance.

‘The plane was unfortunately, totally destroyed by fire.’ 

Police closed Wagga Wagga Airport and plan to reopen it once the aircraft debris has been removed from the runway. 

An investigation into the circumstances surrounding the plane bursting into flames has been launched and will be handed over to Recreational Aviation Australia.   

They banked left and returned to the airport where they barely managed to escape the aircraft before it burst into flames. Both aircraft occupants sustained minor injuries and were treated on the scene

They banked left and returned to the airport where they barely managed to escape the aircraft before it burst into flames. Both aircraft occupants sustained minor injuries and were treated on the scene

A study into engine failures found Jabiru aircraft’s reported 130 incidents over a six year period. 

Between 2009 and 2014, half of Jabiru engine failures or malfunctions were due to a fractured component. 

The most commonly reported failure mechanism in Jabiru powered aircraft were through-bolt failures with 21 being reported between 2009 and 2014. 

Police closed Wagga Wagga Airport (pictured) and plan to reopen it once the aircraft debris has been removed from the runway

Police closed Wagga Wagga Airport (pictured) and plan to reopen it once the aircraft debris has been removed from the runway

 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk