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Two men jump into Katherine River and pose in front of crocodile trap

‘We did it for the photo’: Two men risk their lives by chugging beers inside a crocodile trap for Instagram glory – but say it’s OK because they’re ‘experts’ on the notorious river

  • Two men jumped into crocodile infested Katherine River for a photo last week
  • Tim and his friend had been chucking back a couple of beers before daring stunt
  • He admitted it wasn’t the best idea though wanted to pose for Instagram photo
  • Only last year the largest crocodile was caught in the river and measured 4.7m 
  • Do you know more? Contact aidan.wondracz@mailonline.com 

Two daredevils risked their lives and jumped into crocodile-infested waters to pose for a photo in front of a crocodile trap.

Tim and his friend had been drinking a couple of beers before they decided to take a dip in the Katherine River, in the Northern Territory, last week.

Only last year, wildlife rangers caught the largest crocodile ever seen along the 330km stretch of water after they hauled in a 4.7metre long crocodile. 

While Tim admitted he knew it wasn’t a good idea to jump into the water, he said the rules took a backseat for Instagram glory, NT News reported.

Two daredevils risked their lives and jumped into crocodile infested waters to pose for an Instagram photo (pictured, Tim and his friend posing in front of a crocodile trap)

Only last year, wildlife rangers caught the largest crocodile ever seen along the 330km stretch of water after they hauled in a 4.7metre long crocodile

Only last year, wildlife rangers caught the largest crocodile ever seen along the 330km stretch of water after they hauled in a 4.7metre long crocodile

A photo of the pair showed Tim and his unnamed friend posing in the dangerous waters in front of a crocodile trap.

A broad-grinning Tim holds a cigarette in one hand and a beer in the other with half his body submerged in the water.

His friend sits on the crocodile trap with his legs dangling in the river.

Tim said he was aware of the dangers of the river, but said he was pretty much an ‘expert’ on the stretch of river and was aware of the threat from crocodiles.

Why do people pose in front of crocodile traps? 

A number of people have been photographed risking their lives and posing next to a crocodile trap over the years.

As Tim explained, he knew the dangers he was getting into when he jumped into the Katherine River with his friend last week. Though he admitted he did the stunt for the photo.  

In 2014 a man was seen posing for a photo next to a crocodile trap at Kakadu National Park.

At the time, the park’s operations manager Anthony Contarino said he believed people enjoyed the publicity. 

‘(But) I figured it would be all right, it had been a poor wet season and they hadn’t caught much out that way,’ he said.

‘We did it for the photo honestly.’ 

Department of Tourism, Sport and Culture Senior wildlife ranger John Burke said crocodile traps were strategically placed in areas where there was a known presence of the predators.

‘Crocodile traps are placed in areas crocodiles are known to inhabit, so there are real risks associated with behaviour such as this,’ he said. 

Anyone caught interfering with a crocodile trap risks a $7,850 fine or six months imprisonment. 

Though this is not the first time people have been photographed risking their lives and standing next to a crocodile trap. 

In 2017, a couple of teenagers were snapped standing on top of a cage as it floated down a river near Batchelor.

Another person was photographed standing right next to the opening of the cage and giving two thumbs up

Another person was photographed standing right next to the opening of the cage and giving two thumbs up

In 2017, a couple of teenagers were snapped standing on top of a cage as it floated down a river near Batchelor

In 2017, a couple of teenagers were snapped standing on top of a cage as it floated down a river near Batchelor

Though this is not the first time people have been photographed risking their lives and standing next to a crocodile trap

Though this is not the first time people have been photographed risking their lives and standing next to a crocodile trap 

Another person was photographed standing right next to the opening of the cage and giving two thumbs up. 

Four crocodiles have already been caught in several traps along the Katherine River this year alone. 

The saltwater crocodile is regarded as one of the deadliest animals in the country with an estimated 150,000 living in the Top End – or north Australia. 

A male crocodile can grow up to six metres in length while a female can measure as long as three metres. 

The impressive power of their jaws makes them a formidable beast in the wild.

They have the ability to apply 5,000 pounds of pressure per square inch with their jaw – humans can only apply 100 pounds per square inch.

Despite the iron clad bite, crocodiles have little ‘opening strength’ and their mouths can be kept shut with a band. 

The agile moving crocodiles also have the ability to swim up to speeds of 32k/h.

The Katherine River stretches for 330km along the Northern Territory (stock image)

The Katherine River stretches for 330km along the Northern Territory (stock image)

Tim and his friend had been chucking back a couple of beers before they decided to take a dip in the crocodile infested Katherine River, in the Northern Territory, last week (stock image)

Tim and his friend had been chucking back a couple of beers before they decided to take a dip in the crocodile infested Katherine River, in the Northern Territory, last week (stock image)

The saltwater crocodile

The saltwater crocodile is regarded as one of the deadliest animals in the country with an estimated 150,000 living in the Top End – or north Australia. 

The impressive power of their jaws makes them a formidable beast in the wild.

They have the ability to apply 5,000 pounds of pressure per square inch with their jaw – humans can only apply 100 pounds per square inch.

Despite the iron clad bite, crocodiles have little ‘opening strength’ and their mouths can be kept shut with a band. 

The agile moving crocodiles also have the ability to swim up to speeds of 32k/h.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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