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Two of George Formby’s treasured ukuleles are expected to fetch at least £30,000 at auction 

Two of George Formby’s treasured ukuleles are expected to fetch at least £30,000 at auction

  • Collection, including Wigan singer’s treasured banjo ukuleles, could fetch £30k
  • Memorabilia includes photos, a letter written by Formby and a life-sized model 
  • Formby was Britain’s highest paid entertainer in 1930s and 40s and died in 1961 

He is remembered for his toothy grin and ukelele-powered classics such as When I’m Cleaning Windows.

Now two of George Formby’s treasured banjo ukuleles are among a collection expected to fetch at least £30,000 at auction. 

The singer, actor and comedian, from Wigan was Britain’s highest paid entertainer in the 1930s and 40s.

A collection of items relating to George Formby, including a photo of him with actress Florence Desmond, is expected to sell for at least £30,000 at auction

A life-sized model of the star, who died in 1961 aged 56, is also in the collection of memorabilia which includes a letter Formby sent to two musicians in 1936 complaining about overly sexy songs they had written for him.

Jim Spencer, of auctioneers Hansons, said: ‘It’s a hugely important private collection.’ 

The ukuleles played by Formby, whose other hits included Leaning On A Lamp-Post, could each fetch up to £15,000 in the online sale on Thursday.

George Formby's treasured ukuleles could fetch at least £30,000 at auction

A life-sized model of the singer is also for sale in the collection

Jim Spencer, of auctioneers Hansons, says the memorabilia collection, which includes two of the Wigan star’s treasured banjo ukuleles (left) and a life-sized model of the singer (right), is a ‘hugely important private collection’

Mr Spencer added: ‘In his heyday, Formby was the UK’s highest paid entertainer. He was renowned for his light-hearted, comical songs, accompanied by the ukulele or banjolele.

‘We’re proud to be selling this important collection and hope to honour George Formby’s legacy.

‘When I collected the objects, I had no space left for the life-size figure of George, so the vendor encouraged me to strap him into passenger seat.

‘It was the only option. So, I had a four-hour drive back home with other motorists thinking I had a pretend twin brother keeping me company.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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