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UK hospitals record 250 more Covid fatalities in highest Sunday death toll since beginning of May 

UK hospitals record 250 more Covid fatalities – up by 82 compared to last week – in highest Sunday death toll since beginning of May

  • Coronavirus hospital death toll has seen the highest Sunday increase since May 
  • Britain’s coronavirus hospital death toll has increased by 250, new figures say
  • Last Sunday saw the toll increase by 168, and the Sunday before that was 161

Britain’s coronavirus hospital death toll has increased by 250 – the highest Sunday increase since the start of May. 

Last Sunday saw the hospital death toll increase by 168, and the Sunday before that, November 8, saw another 161 patients die.

England saw an increase of 222 coronavirus hospital deaths, while Scotland had seven, Wales had 11 and Northern Ireland had 10. 

Last Sunday saw the hospital death toll increase by 168, and the Sunday before that, November 8, saw another 161 patients die (pictured: A test in November) 

Today’s figure is the highest Sunday toll since May 3, when 358 deaths were recorded, The Mirror reports. 

Scottish Government figures published on Sunday show the number of fatalities by this measure – when a positive test has been returned in the preceding 28 days – has increased to 3,503.

Across Scotland, 844 new cases were recorded, taking the total number of positive tests to 88,361.

The test positivity rate dropped from 5.9% to 5.4%.

The NHS Greater Glasgow and Clyde health board area again had the highest increase in daily cases at 309, followed by Lanarkshire on 181 and Lothian, where 119 were recorded.

The number of admissions to hospital was down 23 to 1,170, while those in intensive car fell by five to 95.

The new figures come as a row over care home admission has been reignited.

In answer to a parliamentary question from Labour health spokeswoman Monica Lennon, Health Secretary Jeane Freeman said patients being discharged from hospital many not need to have two negative tests, as has been Scottish Government policy since April, if clinicians believe it is in their interest to be moved.

Speaking to the BBC on Sunday, Ms Freeman said it is ‘right and proper’ that medical staff are able to make those decisions.

She added: ‘It is not right – and I don’t believe your viewers would expect me, as a non-medical, non-clinical politician – to be intervening in that decision.’

Ms Lennon called on the Scottish Government to put an end to the practice, accusing the Health Secretary of ‘throwing doctors and social workers under the bus for following her guidance’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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