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University Challenge: Bristol Le Maistre blurts out ‘Uranus’

Fans are left in hysterics as flustered University Challenge contestant blurts out ‘Uranus’ without even the hint of a smile

  • Bristol went head to head with Edinburgh in Monday night’s quarter-final
  • Anne Le Maistre’s team were asked a question about a planet’s spinning storm 
  • The Bristol captain blurted out ‘Uranus’ leaving viewers at home in hysterics
  • Bristol crashed out, while Edinburgh will now go through to the semi-finals 

University Challenge fans were left sniggering last night after a contestant blurted out the word ‘Uranus’ without cracking a smile.

Representing Bristol in Monday night’s quarter-final match, team captain Anne Le Maistre wrongly named the seventh planet in a question about spinning storms. 

The mature history student became flustered when asked on which planet a giant storm dubbed the Great Dark Spot was observed by NASA’s Voyager 2 space probe in 1989.

After much deliberation with teammates Sumner, Iredale and Basu, Le Maistre was prompted for an answer by host Jeremy Paxman – to which the flustered contestant blurted out ‘Uranus?’

Team captain Anne Le Maistre became flustered when asked on which planet a giant storm dubbed the Great Dark Spot was observed by NASA’s Voyager 2 space probe in 1989

The correct answer was Neptune, but it was the unintentional double entendre which left viewers in hysterics. 

Taking to Twitter, one fan wrote: ‘Uranus is always a dangerous answer to give.’  

Another quipped: ‘She just answered “Uranus” without even the hint of a smile. I’ve lost all respect for her.’ 

One wrote: ‘Love it when they say Uranus on #UniversityChallenge *sniggers*.’ 

While Nick Holland tweeted: ‘When you now it’s wrong, but you just wanted to say Uranus to Jeremy Paxman!’ 

Other viewers joked the BBC Two quiz show had become ‘saucy’ after Le Maistre unintentionally licked her lips after blurting out the answer.  

Oops! Representing Bristol in Monday night's quarter-final match, team captain Anne Le Maistre, pictured, wrongly named the seventh planet in a question about spinning storms

Oops! Representing Bristol in Monday night’s quarter-final match, team captain Anne Le Maistre, pictured, wrongly named the seventh planet in a question about spinning storms

Le Maistre was prompted for an answer by host Jeremy Paxman - to which the flustered contestant blurted out 'Uranus?' The incorrect answer left fans in hysterics

Le Maistre was prompted for an answer by host Jeremy Paxman – to which the flustered contestant blurted out ‘Uranus?’ The incorrect answer left fans in hysterics

Despite a promising start last night Le Maistre, originally from Adelaide in South Australia, was sent packing when her team (pictured bottom row) lost 120 to 155 against Edinburgh

Despite a promising start last night Le Maistre, originally from Adelaide in South Australia, was sent packing when her team (pictured bottom row) lost 120 to 155 against Edinburgh

Le Maistre's unintentional pun left viewers in hysterics, with one fan branding the episode 'saucy' while others were particularly amused at the team captain licking her lips

Le Maistre’s unintentional pun left viewers in hysterics, with one fan branding the episode ‘saucy’ while others were particularly amused at the team captain licking her lips

Just weeks ago, Le Maistre’s team had seemed tipped for victory after going head-to-head with Cambridge in a nail-biting dead heat round when the two teams finished on a draw.

But despite a promising start last night Le Maistre, originally from Adelaide in South Australia, was sent packing when her team lost 120 to 155 against Edinburgh. 

 Edinburgh will now go through to the gruelling semi-final round to face the University of Durham and St. Edmund Hall Oxford in the semi-finals.

University Challenge continues on BBC Two next Monday at 8pm 

What is Neptune’s Great Dark Spot? 

The Great Dark Spot was discovered in Neptune’s southern hemisphere when Voyager 2 flew past the last planet from the sun in 1989. 

It is an anticyclonic storm like Jupiter’s Great Red Spot, and about the same size as Earth at 8,100 miles (13,000km) across.

White cirrus clouds form around its fringes, made from crystals of frozen methane.

Neptune’s Great Dark Spot performed something of a vanishing act in 1994, disappearing completely when the Hubble Space Telescope looked for it.

However, this magic act was not permanent, as a new dark spot sprang to life in Neptune’s northern hemisphere and is still blowing today at 1,500 miles (2,400km) per hour.

Even faster clouds have been observed on Neptune, called scooters because they scoot around Neptune far faster than the lumbering dark spot.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk