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Urgent warning to asthma sufferers as dangerous dust cloud sweeps Australia

‘Stay inside!: Urgent warning to asthma sufferers and those with respiratory conditions as dangerous dust cloud sweeps Australia

  • Residents with asthma and respiratory conditions warned to stay inside homes
  • Dust storm sweeping across South Australia presenting risks to some residents
  • The dust storm is on the back of damaging winds reaching as much as 70km/h 
  • Motorists are also being urged to stay off the roads in low visibility conditions 

Residents with asthma and other respiratory conditions are being urged to remain inside as a dangerous dust storm sweeps across South Australia.

Damaging winds averaging between 50 and 70km/h with gusts as high as 80 to 100km/h are forecast for much of the state on Thursday.

A Bureau of Meteorology statement said the dust will reduce visibility and is a risk to people suffering from respiratory conditions.

The dust storms are expected to last until Saturday afternoon. 

Residents with asthma and other respiratory conditions are being urged to remain indoors as a dangerous dust storm sweeps across South Australia 

South Australia's State Emergency Service (SES) also issued a warning to residents. Darryl Wright, SES Chief of Staff, said motorists needed to take extra care and be vigilant when driving

South Australia’s State Emergency Service (SES) also issued a warning to residents. Darryl Wright, SES Chief of Staff, said motorists needed to take extra care and be vigilant when driving 

SA Health issued an urgent warning to all residents across the state. 

‘People with asthma and other respiratory or cardiac conditions are advised that tomorrow’s expected strong northerly winds have potential to raise levels of dust across large areas of South Australia, and could exacerbate their condition,’ the statement read. 

Particles which can be found in dust storms include dust, soil, sand, microorganisms such as bacteria and spores of fungi.

Those with respiratory conditions should also avoid exercise to reduce the number of particles entering their lungs. 

Areas expected to be heavily impacted include Adelaide, Port Lincoln, Whyalla, Mount Gambier, Coober Pedy and Roxby Downs. 

‘The cold front is expected near Ceduna early afternoon, Adelaide around midnight and then is expected to move into the North East Pastoral during Friday,’ a BOM statement read. 

South Australia’s State Emergency Service (SES) also issued a warning to residents.  

Darryl Wright, SES Chief of Staff, said motorists needed to take extra care and be vigilant when driving. 

‘If the visibility is reduced, take extra precautions such as turning your headlights on, allow safe braking distances, and drive to the conditions,’ Mr Wright said. 

Particles which can be found in dust storms include dust, soil, sand, microorganisms such as bacteria and spores of fungi

Particles which can be found in dust storms include dust, soil, sand, microorganisms such as bacteria and spores of fungi 

Further warnings indicate current weather patterns are creating the perfect conditions for a 'Severe and Extreme' fire danger ratings

Further warnings indicate current weather patterns are creating the perfect conditions for a ‘Severe and Extreme’ fire danger ratings

Strong winds associated with the front may also increase the risk of trees or branches falling. 

‘Where possible, people should avoid being around large trees during strong winds, and secure loose items, such as trampolines,’ Mr Wright said. 

Further warnings indicate current weather patterns are creating the perfect conditions for a ‘Severe and Extreme’ fire danger ratings.

‘Cleve, Minlaton, Stenhouse Bay and Port Lincoln all registered their worst September fire weather in more than a decade on Thursday, based on wind, temperature and humidity observations alone,’ a Weatherzone statement read.

‘The Country Fire Service is advising people in South Australia to avoid any burnoff activities on Thursday due to the heightened risk of bush and grass fires.’

HOW TO PROTECT YOURSELF IN A DUST STORM

  • Avoiding exercise, especially outdoors, to reduce the intake of particles into your lungs
  • Adhering to your medication schedule
  • Activating your asthma management plan.

STAYING SAFE ON THE ROADS DURING A DUST STORM

  • Dust storms can reduce visibility. Extra caution should be taken when driving a vehicle. If visibility is very low, park in a safe place to avoid collisions.
  • If your car has air conditioning, reduce the incoming dust by switching the air intake to recirculate.

 Source: SA Health

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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