News, Culture & Society

Users delighted by product that means they don’t go red when they drink alcohol

A new patch is making the rounds on Instagram, promising Asians to ‘cure’ them of their ‘Asian glow’. 

In theory, the Redee patch is designed to reduce the flush red that around 40 percent of East Asians experience when they drink due to a mutated gene.

Normally, the gene breaks down a toxin in alcohol known as acetaldehyde and converts it into an energy source. But in those with a mutated copy, the gene is unable to break the toxin down. 

But the Redee patch contains an antioxidant known as glutathione, which binds to acetaldehyde, and turns the toxin into harmless acetate.

Since the patch selling in March, thousands of Asian Americans – and even some Caucasians – have been posting their success stories, saying that for the first time in years they are able to go out for drinks without ‘turning into a lobster’.

The Redee patch is making the rounds on Instagram, promising Asians to ‘cure’ them of their ‘Asian glow’, which is a condition called alcohol flush reaction

Normally, the ALDH2 gene breaks down a toxin in alcohol known as acetaldehyde and converts it into an energy source. But in those with a mutated copy, the gene is unable to break the toxin down

Normally, the ALDH2 gene breaks down a toxin in alcohol known as acetaldehyde and converts it into an energy source. But in those with a mutated copy, the gene is unable to break the toxin down

The so-called ‘Asian glow’ is a condition called alcohol flush reaction 

This occurs when a person develops a flush or red blotches on their face, neck, shoulder, chest or even entire body after having alcohol.

The reaction occurs after acetaldehyde, a byproduct after alcohol is metabolized, enters the bloodstream.

Most of us have an gene known as ALDH2, which codes for an enzyme that neutralized acetaldehyde and oxidizes alcohol.

However many either have a variant of the gene or do not make enough of the enzyme, which releases histamines and causes the flushing reaction.

Often times, additional symptoms occur including a headache, nausea and a faster heart rate. 

Although anybody can have an alcohol flush reaction, it is most common in Asians: about 36 percent of East Asians (Chinese, Japanese and Koreans) experience it.  

Studies have shown that people with the mutated gene can suffer from several health problems.

A January 2018 study from Cambridge University in the UK found that mice who were unable to process acetaldehyde had four times more DNA damage in their blood cells and chromosomal damage.

A 2009 study conducted by researchers in the US and Japan found that people with the syndrome have an increased risk of esophageal cancer if they drink moderate amounts of alcohol. 

Anecdotally, many Asians say they take antihistamines such as Zantac or Pepcid AC to reduce the reddening effects. 

However, these medications slow how quickly alcohol is metabolized and can increase blood alcohol levels very quickly. 

Enter the Redee patch.

Although anybody can have an alcohol flush reaction, it is most common in Asians: about 36 percent of East Asians (Chinese, Japanese and Koreans) experience it

Studies have shown that people with the mutated gene can suffer from several health problems including DNA damage and an increased risk of esophageal cancer

Although anybody can have an alcohol flush reaction, it is most common in Asians: about 36 percent of East Asians (Chinese, Japanese and Koreans) experience it. Studies have shown that people with the mutated gene can suffer from several health problems including DNA damage and an increased risk of esophageal cancer

The main active ingredient is an antioxidant known as glutathione, which binds to acetaldehyde, and turns the toxin into harmless acetate.

The main active ingredient is an antioxidant known as glutathione, which binds to acetaldehyde, and turns the toxin into harmless acetate.

There also several ingredients in the patch that promote glutathione production to help fix 'Asian glow'.

There also several ingredients in the patch that promote glutathione production to help fix ‘Asian glow’.

Marketed as an alternative to the heartburn-med fix, the makers say the patch stops reddening from even occur. 

Redee founder Ryan Lee says the problem with using heartburn medications is that they only mask the flush reaction and do nothing to reduce the amount of acetaldehyde in the body.

Lee told Mel Magazine that he partnered with alcohol metabolism researchers to formulate the Redee patch.

The main active ingredient is an antioxidant known as glutathione, which binds to acetaldehyde, and turns the toxin into harmless acetate.

There also several ingredients in the patch that promote glutathione production to help fix ‘Asian glow’. 

‘We’re not really trying to fix an external appearance,’ Lee told the magazine.

‘That’s part of it, but the real problem is people who can’t have a glass of wine without feeling bad internally as far as nausea, a faster heart rate and the headache. 

‘We’re not trying to encourage binge drinking or more frequent drinking. We want to give people the freedom just to drink on their own terms.’

The makers recommend applying one to two patches either on the shoulder, neck, chest or stomach 20 to 30 minutes before drinking

The makers recommend applying one to two patches either on the shoulder, neck, chest or stomach 20 to 30 minutes before drinking

The patches began selling in March and can be found on the Redee website, where a pack of six costs $11.99 while a pack of 30 goes for $39.99.

The makers recommend applying one to two patches either on the shoulder, neck, chest or stomach 20 to 30 minutes before drinking. 

Since then, several posts on Instagram of Asian Americans have shown them promoting the patch saying they no longer have a red face or any other side effects when they drink.   

Blogger and vlogger Maggi Mei documented her experience on her blog and YouTube channel, where she said the patch cured her of her rosy cheeks. 

Operations head Emily Basileo told Mel Magazine that even though alcohol flush reaction can occur in other ethnicities, Redee is planning to market directly to the Asian American community.  

‘This product is, of course, for all Asians who feel uncomfortable when they drink,’ Basileo told the magazine.

‘But we do think it’s easier to market in the US. We wanted to make a product that works for us, Asian Americans. And the need for this is obvious when you’re the one red Asian in a sea of white.’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


Comments are closed.