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Van Jones admits that Republican outreach to black and Latino voters was effective

CNN commentator Van Jones has admitted that Republicans were ‘effective’ in their outreach to black and Latino voters, after President Donald Trump made gains with both groups on Election Day.

‘I don’t care who you are, nobody predicted this outcome,’ Jones said on the network on Wednesday. ‘It turns out that the outreach from Republicans to African Americans and Latinos was effective.’ 

Jones went on to say that very few people expected Trump to make inroads with non-white voters because he ‘says racially inflammatory stuff’.

‘It turns out that wasn’t true,’ Jones continued. He gave Joe Biden credit for his outreach efforts, but said that ‘people vote for all kinds of different reasons, so both parties have got to go back to the drawing board.’

CNN commentator Van Jones has admitted that Republicans were ‘effective’ in their outreach to black and Latino voters

According to surveys conducted by Edison Research, Trump has boosted his share of the black vote to 12 percent nationwide, a four-point jump from his support in 2016

According to surveys conducted by Edison Research, Trump has boosted his share of the black vote to 12 percent nationwide, a four-point jump from his support in 2016

Demonstrators participate in 'Latinos for Trump' demonstration, a parade in support of US President Donald J. Trump, at Tamiami Park in Miami last month

Demonstrators participate in ‘Latinos for Trump’ demonstration, a parade in support of US President Donald J. Trump, at Tamiami Park in Miami last month

According to surveys conducted by Edison Research, Trump has boosted his share of the black vote to 12 percent nationwide, a four-point jump from his support in 2016. 

Among black voters between aged 30 to 44, support for Trump jumped an impressive 11 points in 2020.

Trump’s support also rose four points among Latino voters this year, with 32 percent telling exit pollsters they backed Trump in 2020.

Nationally, preliminary numbers indicated that 26 percent of Trump’s voting share came from nonwhite voters — the highest percentage for a GOP presidential candidate since 1960.

In Florida, Latino voters proved crucial for Trump this year, propelling him to a narrow victory in the state. 

Trump, who also won the state four years ago, outperformed his 2016 margins with Florida’s Hispanics, who make up 19 percent of the state’s voters. 

President Donald Trump give a thumbs up to the cheering crowd after a Latinos for Trump Coalition roundtable in Phoenix. Trump made inroads with Latino voters in 2020

President Donald Trump give a thumbs up to the cheering crowd after a Latinos for Trump Coalition roundtable in Phoenix. Trump made inroads with Latino voters in 2020

A lot of the swing came in Miami-Dade, the county that contains Florida’s largest Cuban and Venezuelan communities.

Many Americans of Cuban and Venezuelan backgrounds left countries that they considered were ruined by socialist policies. So when Trump and his allies painted opponent Joe Biden, a moderate Democrat, as either a socialist himself, or in cahoots with the ‘radical left,’ that struck home, some Miami voters said.

Trump won Texas and also ate into Latinos’ support for Democrats in that state, results showed. An overall U.S. presidential election result is still pending as ballots continue to be counted.

Some election observers had thought that Trump’s harsh stance on immigration, and his administration’s treatment of asylum-seekers – often from Central America – would hurt him more among those of Hispanic background.

But Latinos are a widely disparate group, and many hold religious or conservative views that chime with those of Trump.

‘The Latino surge is real, and it is happening across the country,’ White House spokeswoman Kayleigh McEnany wrote in a tweet Tuesday night.

The election remained up in the air on Wednesday night, with Biden positioned to win if additional states come through for him. 

If he loses, some of the blame can be laid on his failure to engage with Latino voters, said Jaime Regalado, a political science professor at California State University in Los Angeles.

‘He just wasn’t there,’ Regalado said. ‘He didn’t spend a lot of time courting Latinos until the final two weeks of the campaign. It could turn out to be a huge mistake.’ 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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