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Vegan A Place to Call Home actress poses naked and covered in fake blood for new PETA campaign

Vegan actress poses naked and covered in fake blood while pretending to be a SHEEP for a PETA anti-wool campaign

  • Arianwen Parkes-Lockwood holds a small sheep that is also covered in blood 
  • She also appeared in a video and detailed sheep’s treatment in the wool industry 
  • In the video, she pretends to be a young sheep that is attacked and killed 

Vegan actress Arianwen Parkes-Lockwood has appeared in a PETA video where she pretends to be a sheep as part of a new anti-wool campaign. 

The graphic video protests against the treatment of sheep while they are being prepared and sheared for wool.

The A Place to Call Home actress also appeared in a photograph naked, covered in blood and grazes while holding a small sheep.

The image is accompanied by the tagline: ‘Leave wool out of your wardrobe.’

 

Vegan actress Arianwen Parkes-Lockwood appeared in a photograph naked, covered in blood and grazes while holding a small sheep also covered in blood. The image is accompanied by the tagline: ‘Leave wool out of your wardrobe’

‘Each time my wool grew out, humans came and took me to a shed to sheer it off,’ Ms Parkes-Lockwood said in the video while pretending to be a sheep. 

‘They held me down, which was terrifying, but if I tried to get away, they punched me in the face or beat me with sharp metal clippers.

‘They slammed my head into the floor over and over again.

‘I didn’t even know them but they seemed to hate me.’ 

The rest of the video shows sheep being attacked by shearers, transported via boat once they are of a certain aged and eventually killed by having their throats slit. 

Ms Parkes-Lockwood grew up in regional NSW and said her grandfather was a sheep farmer. 

She said her grandfather was a kind man but only worked in the industry because there weren’t any alternatives. 

‘The world was a much smaller place then. There weren’t alternative careers for people, there weren’t alternative fibres for fashion back then,’ she told The Daily Telegraph.

‘Basically, with industries like this, there comes a time they need to change.’

The A Place to Call Home actress also appeared in a PETA video where she pretends to be a sheep as part of a new anti-wool campaign

The A Place to Call Home actress also appeared in a PETA video where she pretends to be a sheep as part of a new anti-wool campaign

PETA shared the video on their official website and Australian YouTube channel with the hopes that it would raise awareness surrounding the treatment of sheep.  

‘Born into flocks too large for individualised care and lacking industry standards that require shelter, around a quarter of lambs born in Australia die from exposure within 48 hours of birth,’ PETA said.  

‘The industry accepts these cruel deaths because the overall number of lambs born is higher. To farmers, it’s just a numbers game to increase profits.’ 

‘Sheep are gentle prey animals who are petrified of even being held down, yet many endure vicious beatings and sustain bloody wounds and broken limbs when they’re used for wool.’

Ms Parkes-Lockwood grew up in regional NSW and said her grandfather was a sheep farmer. She said her grandfather was a kind man but only worked in the industry because there weren't any alternatives

Ms Parkes-Lockwood grew up in regional NSW and said her grandfather was a sheep farmer. She said her grandfather was a kind man but only worked in the industry because there weren’t any alternatives

The Australian wool industry is the largest in the world and provides more than 80 per cent of apparel fibre. 

The industry provides regional employment and was responsible for $3.61billion in export revenue in 2017/18. 

WoolProducers Australia president Ed Storey dismissed PETA’s latest campaign and said the group were about raising money for themselves.  

‘The health and welfare of our sheep is the number one priority for Australian woolgrowers, Mr Storey said. 

He said they need to ensure the sheep are healthy and happy to continue producing the most sustainable and natural wool possible.   

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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