News, Culture & Society

Vets urge owners to consider insect-based meals

Would you feed your pet a meal made from INSECTS? Vets urge owners to consider eco-friendly alternatives to meaty meals for their beloved companions to tackle climate change

  • British Veterinary Association says insect-rich meals are good for pets  
  • It also revealed the meals lower the carbon footprint of pet food 
  • Insects are a source of protein which require less space and energy than meat  
  • Agriculture is one of the leading contributors to global warming and greenhouse gas emissions 

A diet rich in insects and less traditional meats could be the future for pets, according to vets. 

The British Veterinary Association says insect-rich meals could help people reduce their carbon footprint and contribute to the ongoing battle to halt climate change. 

They also reveal the new-era diet may offer health benefits to the animals, including dogs and cats, to improve their well-being. 

Currently, insect based pet food is more expensive than top of the range, traditional meat-based alternatives. 

It can be up to four times as expensive compared to budget meal options but advocates say the clean conscience and the lesser environmental impact will appeal to many.

 

The British Veterinary Association says insect-rich meals could help people reduce their carbon footprint and contribute to the ongoing battle to halt climate change. They also reveal the new-era diet may offer health benefits to the animals, including dogs and cats, to improve their well-being (stock)

The unusual claims are likely to be met with resistance and scepticism by animal lovers, but the vets say this will slowly subside. 

Insect protein has long been heralded by conservationists as a potential solution to the worsening climate crisis, providing a rich source of protein but not impacting the environment as much as traditional alternatives. 

Insect protein has long been heralded by conservationists as the hero for the worsening climate crisis, providing a rich source of protein without destroying the environment.

Insect protein has long been heralded by conservationists as the hero for the worsening climate crisis, providing a rich source of protein without destroying the environment.

WHAT IS INSECT MEAT?   

Insect farming is relatively commonplace and involves raising, eating, and breeding insects as livestock.

Insects may be farmed for the commodities they produce, or as a food source. 

At the moment some insect-based food in the UK is more expensive than traditional alternatives. 

However, Dutch manufacturer Protix claims an equivalent product needs just two per cent of the land and 4 per cent of the water per kg of protein.

Agriculture and the raising of animals, such as cows and chickens, is a resource intense process which produces vast amounts of greenhouse gases.  

Simon Doherty, the BVA president, told the BBC: ‘There’s a really exciting future for the use of insect protein for companion animals.

‘It’s a fantastic opportunity – looking at insects to provide alternative sources of some of the nutrient ingredients we use in pet food diets.’

The move towards an insect-fuelled future is already underway, with some UK firms already selling pet food with up to 40 per cent insect protein.

Insect-based foods are a burgeoning field, but Dutch manufacturer Protix claims an equivalent product needs just two per cent of the land and 4 per cent of the water per kg of protein.

Protix founder Kees Aarts told the BBC: ‘Round the world we are heating up the atmosphere and using up the land.

‘But we have also to feed a growing population in need of protein. We have to do something differently – and insects are part of the solution.’ 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


Comments are closed.