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Victoria’s health minister responds to criticism of her handing of the state’s coronavirus disaster

‘I’m deeply sorry’: Victoria’s health minister FINALLY responds to criticism of her handing of the state’s COVID-19 disaster with an emotional post

  • Jenny Mikakos said there is ‘no go-to manual of how to respond to pandemics’
  • Victorian health minister wrote an emotional defence to her COVID-19 response
  • Calls mounted for Ms Mikakos to resign over Victoria’s bungled hotel quarantine
  • The Andrews government refused to comment on the issue as inquiry is ongoing
  • Treasurer Josh Frydenberg said Victorians had a right to know what went wrong

Jenny Mikakos has penned an emotional response in defence of her dealing with the growing outbreak of COVID-19 in Victoria.

The Victorian health minister took to Twitter overnight to respond to critics of her handling of the pandemic, where she claimed there is ‘no detailed go-to manual of how to respond to these pandemics’. 

‘Responses need to be calibrated and adjusted, continually evolving to changing circumstances,’ she wrote.

‘Since the first case in January, a huge effort by thousands of health care workers and many others has seen a huge amount of good work achieved in preparing our health system.

‘It was work that needed to be done quickly and nimbly because the virus would not wait and no doubt, mistakes were made along the way, because humans are flawed yet contagious viruses are unforgiving.’

Victoria’s health minister Jenny Mikakos (pictured) said there is ‘no go-to manual of how to respond to pandemics’

Police patrol outside Flinders Street Station in Melbourne on Saturday night amid strict stage four lockdown measures in the city in the wake of the second wave of coronavirus

Police patrol outside Flinders Street Station in Melbourne on Saturday night amid strict stage four lockdown measures in the city in the wake of the second wave of coronavirus

Calls have mounted for Ms Mikakos to resign after she failed to respond to questions about Victoria’s bungled hotel quarantine outbreaks in a parliamentary meeting.

She was called ‘smug’ and a ‘disgrace’ in parliament on Wednesday during the first sitting of Victoria’s upper house since June 18.

Ms Mikakos said she was ‘deeply sorry’ and prepared to ‘let the cards fall where they may’ as former judge Jennifer Coate conducts an inquiry into the bungled hotel quarantine program. 

‘Since that fateful day on 25 January, when we had our first-ever case, I’ve worked every day to keep everyone safe,’ she added.

‘I have put every ounce of energy I’ve had into that effort. If it wasn’t enough, then I’m deeply sorry.

‘I’ve always striven to be upfront and measured about the challenges facing us. So it pains me to see the incorrect assumption made that somehow I can single-handedly report on the actions of countless individuals and many agencies involved in our pandemic response.

‘Let the independent judge do her job, let the cards fall where they may. I believe there is nothing to fear in seeking the truth. The truth will set you free.’ 

Par of Ms Mikakos twitter post on Saturday night, where she said she had put 'every ounce of energy' into the state's COVID-19 response

Par of Ms Mikakos twitter post on Saturday night, where she said she had put ‘every ounce of energy’ into the state’s COVID-19 response

The Andrews government have said several times it would be inappropriate to comment on the hotel quarantine inquiry before the investigation is finished.

Numerous breaches from hotel quarantine in the state lead to an increase in new cases in the second wave of infections through May and June. 

Treasurer Josh Frydenberg told ABC the program had ‘serious failures’ with ‘deadly consequences’ and Victorians had the right to know what went wrong. 

‘There needs to be accountability, there needs to be an explanation,’ he said.

‘Victorians deserve that, Victorians want that, Victorians need that at this difficult time. They’re being asked to make major sacrifices right now.’

Victoria recorded another 394 cases of coronavirus on Sunday, with 17 deaths, which is the deadliest day in Australia since the pandemic began.

A nurse conducts a coronavirus test on a driver at the COVID-19 pop up testing facility at Bondi in July

A nurse conducts a coronavirus test on a driver at the COVID-19 pop up testing facility at Bondi in July

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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