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Video shows hospital staff line a corridor for a dying organ donor

Surrounded by dozens of medics, family and friends, this dying man was wheeled through a hallway to mark his ‘incredible gift of life’.

Touching video footage shows the 53-year-old, who agreed to donate his organs after his death, being given a ‘walk of respect’.

Tearful hospital staff ceased operations to stand in silence as the man made his way to intensive care to have his life support withdrawn. 

Emotional family and friends also lined the hallway on the fourth floor of St Luke’s Hospital in Meridian, Idaho on Saturday.

It is unclear what organs the man donated, or what illness he was suffering from before his life support was withdrawn. But the footage has been released by the hospital in a tribute to the patient.

Staff at St Luke’s Hospital in Meridian, Idaho, gathered on the fourth floor corridor for an emotional ‘walk of respect’ for an organ donor as he was taken to have his life support switched off

The walk of respect has become a tradition at Idaho’s St Luke’s hospitals, and sees staff turn out to honour those giving the life-saving gift of organ donation.

A video posted on social media by the hospital shows dozens of staff standing in respectful silence as the terminally ill man is taken to be removed from life support.

The man is surrounded by the people who have been keeping him alive as he is taken on his final journey out of intensive care.

Medics standing in the halls were close to tears as, on Saturday September 27, the man became the second donor that week to receive the tribute.

‘I was moved by the number of people who made a point to be there,’ said Anita Kissee, the hospital’s PR manager who posted the video online.

Dozens of staff lined the corridor and some appeared emotional as the terminally ill man was wheeled past in his final moments

Dozens of staff lined the corridor and some appeared emotional as the terminally ill man was wheeled past in his final moments

The man was the second person in a week to have received the walk of respect at the hospital, which has become a tradition for those who are taken to donate their organs when they die

The man was the second person in a week to have received the walk of respect at the hospital, which has become a tradition for those who are taken to donate their organs when they die

NUMBER OF PEOPLE DONATING ORGANS AFTER DEATH REACHES A RECORD HIGH 

The number of people who donated organs after they died has reached a record high, health officials in the UK said in April.

A total of 1,575 people donated organs after they died in 2017/18, the highest figure on record, according to NHS Blood and Transplant (NHSBT).

Every year around 5,000 die in circumstances where organ donation is possible.

Prime Minister Theresa May announced last October that the Government will shift towards an opt-out organ donation system in England, which presumes people give consent for their organs and tissues to be donated in the event of their death unless they state otherwise.

‘There were not a lot of dry eyes – I too was wiping my tears. What a privilege to be invited to be there in that moving moment.’ 

She thanked the family for allowing the hospital to honor him and share the video.

A spokesperson for St Luke’s Health System, which runs the hospital, added: ‘It’s a way to pay tribute to the patient, their incredible gift of life, and support the family during a deeply emotional time.

‘The employees who are available at the time all gather on the fourth floor and line the halls from the ICU to the elevator.

‘We had two this week, which is unusual. Each of our hospitals have their own version of this, but Meridian is the largest.’

The man’s organs have been donated to the Pacific Northwest Transplant Bank, Faithwire reported.

There are more than 114,000 people in the US on the waiting list for organ donation, but only around 0.3 per cent of people die in a way which means their organs can be used.

And while 75 per cent of adults in the country support organ donation, according to government statistics, only 54 per cent of people have signed up.   

The most commonly transplanted organs are kidneys – which can be done when donors are still alive because people have two but can live with one.

After this the liver, heart and lungs are most commonly transplanted, but all must be taken from dead donors.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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