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Virgin Australia has no plans to cancel its order of 30 new Boeing 737 Max 8s despite crashes

Virgin Australia’s plan to receive 30 new Boeing 737 Max 8s remains unchanged despite safety fears after a second fatal crash in just six months

  • Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max 8 jet crashed within minutes of taking off on Sunday
  • Just months earlier, Lion Air 737 Max 8 slammed into the Java Sea in crash
  • Virgin Australia confirmed the airline would receive fleet of same planes 
  • Deaths of 157 passengers and crew in recent crash led to questions about safety

Virgin Australia has no plans to cancel their order of brand-new fleet of Boeing 737 Max 8s despite two devastating crashes involving the troubled model.

An Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max 8 jet crashed within minutes of its takeoff from Addis Ababa on Sunday, killing 149 passengers and eight crew members. 

In October, an Indonesian Lion Air 737 Max 8 flight slammed into the Java Sea just 13 minutes after departing from Jakarta, killing all 189 passengers on board.

Virgin Australia has no plans to cancel their order of brand-new fleet of Boeing 737 Max 8s despite two devastating crashes involving the troubled model. Pictured: A Virgin Australia Boeing 737

An Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max 8 jet crashed within minutes of its takeoff from Addis Ababa on Sunday, killing 149 passengers and eight crew members. Pictured: Rescuers remove body bags from the scene of the crash

An Ethiopian Airlines 737 Max 8 jet crashed within minutes of its takeoff from Addis Ababa on Sunday, killing 149 passengers and eight crew members. Pictured: Rescuers remove body bags from the scene of the crash

A Virgin Australia spokeswoman told Daily Mail Australia it was too early for the company to comment on the crashes but they are expecting to receive 30 of the same planes in November.

A further 10 larger Max 10 airliners are being built by Boeing for Virgin Australia.

In announcing the order, Boeing aid the 737 Max will ‘deliver big savings’ due to fuel-efficient measures.

‘The aircraft’s more efficient structural design, less engine thrust and less required maintenance also add up to substantial cost advantages for airline customers,’ Boeing said in a statement at the time of Virgin Australia’s order. 

The deaths of 157 passengers and crew when the Ethiopian Airlines Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft crashed within minutes of take-off are raising serious questions over the safety record of both the aircraft and airline.

It was on another brand new Boeing 737 Max 8, in Indonesia less than five months ago, that 189 people lost their lives in the Java Sea.

Initial reports show considerable similarities between the Ethiopian and Indonesian disasters which involve the same type of plane. Pictured: Wreckage lies at the crash site of an Ethiopian Airlines flight

Initial reports show considerable similarities between the Ethiopian and Indonesian disasters which involve the same type of plane. Pictured: Wreckage lies at the crash site of an Ethiopian Airlines flight

Initial reports show considerable similarities between the Ethiopian and Indonesian disasters which involve the same type of plane.

Sunday’s flight lost contact about six minutes after take-off, having requested and been given clearance to return to the airport in Abbis Ababa.

In 2018, Lion Air 610 also went down minutes after take-off having requested permission to return to base. 

Telemetry shows the Ethiopian Airlines plane’s vertical airspeed fluctuated rapidly in the minutes and second before its crash, including in the final moments when it seems to have been locked in a terrifyingly accelerating nosedive,.

Investigations thus far by the Indonesian and American aviation authorities have concluded the Lion Air plane also hit the sea after a violent nosedive.

In 2018, Lion Air 610 also went down minutes after take-off having requested permission to return to base. Pictured: Members of a rescue team line up body bags in North Jakarta after the crash

In 2018, Lion Air 610 also went down minutes after take-off having requested permission to return to base. Pictured: Members of a rescue team line up body bags in North Jakarta after the crash

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk