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Volunteering at hospitals will help boost your ‘personal resilience’, head of the NHS says

Volunteering at hospitals will help boost your ‘personal resilience’, head of the NHS says as he calls for a ‘new generation’ of helpers to step up

  • Head of the NHS calls for teenagers and young adults to volunteer in hospitals
  • Research shows volunteering provides the same mental high as going for a run
  • The NHS recently pledged to double its volunteer army over the next three years

The head of the NHS has encouraged teenagers and young adults to help out in hospitals.

Simon Stevens called for a ‘new generation’ of volunteers step forward, pointing out that some roles would undoubtedly lead to future health service careers.

He said volunteering was particularly beneficial for younger age groups in building their self-confidence and giving them invaluable life-skills.

Simon Stevens, above, called for a ‘new generation’ of volunteers step forward. He said volunteering gives people a chance to make new friends and boost job prospects. A stock image of Simon Stevens is pictured above [File photo]

Mr Stevens was speaking ahead of an NHS ‘youth summit’, to be held in Central London on Tuesday, where 166 young volunteers will discuss how to improve health care for young people.

They are aged between 14 and 24 and either volunteer directly in their local hospital or help advise how they should run.

Mr Stevens went on to praise the Daily Mail’s hospital volunteer campaign which ran in December and led to an incredible 33,000 readers pledging their time.

Simon Stevens said volunteering was particularly beneficial for younger age groups in building their self-confidence and giving them invaluable life-skills. He said volunteering was particularly beneficial for younger age groups in building their self-confidence [File photo]

Simon Stevens said volunteering was particularly beneficial for younger age groups in building their self-confidence and giving them invaluable life-skills. He said volunteering was particularly beneficial for younger age groups in building their self-confidence [File photo]

The NHS recently pledged to double its volunteer army over the next three years in recognition of the huge benefits for patients as well as those individuals helping out.

There are currently 77,000 volunteers who work in hospitals and other NHS organisations but officials want to increase this to at least 157,000 by 2022.

And while many of the existing voluntary workforce are in their fifties or retired, officials are particularly keen to recruit more younger helpers.

Research has shown that volunteering provides the same mental high as going for a run and boosts self-esteem, as well as improving life skills for the CV.

Mr Stevens said: ‘Giving up your time to help NHS patients and staff is hugely rewarding whatever your age, but can be particularly beneficial for young people who want to build skills and experience and a great start to their own working lives.

‘In a world where our young people are bombarded by social media messages and images that can sap confidence, volunteering gives you a chance to make new friends and boost job prospects.

The NHS recently pledged to double its volunteer army over the next three years in recognition of the huge benefits for patients as well as those individuals helping out. There are currently 77,000 volunteers who work in hospitals and other NHS organisations [File photo]

The NHS recently pledged to double its volunteer army over the next three years in recognition of the huge benefits for patients as well as those individuals helping out. There are currently 77,000 volunteers who work in hospitals and other NHS organisations [File photo]

‘Volunteers have played a huge role in the NHS since its foundation, helping staff to do what they do best, focus on delivering world-class care.

‘Remembering back to my own childhood experience of having to spend several months in hospital I still remember the commitment and kindness of those who gave up their time to help out, so I’m also personally appreciative of the tens of thousands of people who heeded the Daily Mail’s recent call to sign up to volunteer with the NHS.

‘These days people can take on over 300 different roles in our health service, and many can lead to a career in the NHS – turning the young volunteers of today into the lifesavers of tomorrow.’ 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk