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Waleed Aly and Fairfield mayor argue over ISIS Brides from Syria coming to Sydney on The Project

A concerned mayor has gone toe-to-toe with Waleed Aly after speaking out against the repatriation of ISIS brides and their children from Syrian to his Western Sydney community. 

Fairfield Mayor Frank Carbone slammed the government on The Project for making his region the ‘dumping ground’ for resettled Islamic State families.

Mr Carbone explained that concerns had been raised by several members of his local community, many of whom were refugees themselves that fled Syria to escape ISIS violence.

‘I don’t think he (the prime minister) has taken into account the tens of thousands of refugees that fled their home, had their homes burnt back in Syria, have lost their loved ones, have watched a lot of their families be beheaded and burnt, and have come and resettled in Western Sydney,’ he said on the show. 

He argued that Syrians who helped Australian armed forces fight against ISIS terrorists were ‘more of an Australian citizen than anyone else’ – before Waleed Aly intervened.

‘Legally they’re not, Australian citizens are a different category. We have obligations to Australian citizens that we don’t have to refugees,’ Aly said.

Waleed Aly and Fairfield Mayor Frank Carbone fired up on The Project over the repatriation of ISIS brides and their children from war-torn Syria to Western Sydney

Four women, all of whom married terrorists, and their 13 children touched down in Sydney on Saturday after being removed from the al-Roj camp in Syria (pictured, a camp in Syria)

Four women, all of whom married terrorists, and their 13 children touched down in Sydney on Saturday after being removed from the al-Roj camp in Syria (pictured, a camp in Syria)

Mr Carbone fired back, accusing the ISIS brides of committing treason under  ‘Commonwealth criminal code section 80’. 

‘Treason is when you leave your country and you aide and abet, doesn’t matter if you’re baking a cake or scones and assisting ISIS, you’re committing treason,’ he said.

‘Under that act, you can have your citizenship revoked.’

Aly responded: ‘You’d have to convict them and then do that first though, Frank, and that hasn’t happened.’ 

‘You’re talking a lot about kids here, in fact mostly about kids. Would you leave kids in camps overseas when they are Australian citizens?’ he asked.

Mr Carbone remained firm on his view, demanding the prime minister ‘come to Western Sydney’ to address the issue. 

‘Why is it Western Sydney? Why is it Western Sydney when we have tens of thousands of people that fled ISIS,’ he said. 

‘Australia is a big country, they (ISIS families) don’t necessarily have to be in Western Sydney.’ 

Some of the women who were married to Islamic State fighters and their children were spotted together at a McDonald's in south-west Sydney on Tuesday (pictured)

Some of the women who were married to Islamic State fighters and their children were spotted together at a McDonald’s in south-west Sydney on Tuesday (pictured)

Mr Carbone told Aly that many residents in Fairfield who shared concerns about repatriated families were refugees that had fled Syria to escape the violence of Islamic terrorists

Mr Carbone told Aly that many residents in Fairfield who shared concerns about repatriated families were refugees that had fled Syria to escape the violence of Islamic terrorists

The exchange came after Mr Carbone, Liverpool Mayor Ned Mannoun, and Campbelltown Mayor George Greiss, appeared on Sunrise on Wednesday and said their enraged communities refused to be a ‘dumping ground’ for people who had ‘turned their back on their own country’.

Four women, all of whom were married to Islamic State fighters before they were killed in the war, and their 13 children touched down in Sydney on October 29 after being rescued from the al-Roj refugee camp in Syria . 

Mr Carbone and Mr Mannoun told the morning TV host Natalie Barr they had signed a joint letter asking Prime Minister Anthony Albanese to meet with them to discuss the resettlement of the newest arrivals to their LGAs. 

‘The repatriated women and children should not be resettled in south west Sydney, due to the high level of anxiety and concerns from the communities that have fled Islamic State brutality,’ the letter read in part. 

‘Your government has listened to the repatriated families’ views, but have not taken the time to consult with the communities affected by this decision.’

Mayors Frank Carbone (left) and Ned Mannoun (right) told Sunrise host Natalie Barr on Wednesday they had signed a joint letter asking the Prime Minister Anthony Albanese to meet with them to discuss the newest arrivals to their LGA's

Mayors Frank Carbone (left) and Ned Mannoun (right) told Sunrise host Natalie Barr on Wednesday they had signed a joint letter asking the Prime Minister Anthony Albanese to meet with them to discuss the newest arrivals to their LGA’s 

Mr Carbone said communities had told their mayors ‘loud and clear’ how they felt about the wives and children of Islamic State fighters moving in next-door. 

‘We have a very harmonious community here in western Sydney, people from all over the world,  but it’s important that we get people that want to come back to us and be a part of us, rather than fight against us,’ he said. 

Mr Mannoun said the government did not approach any of the councils to flag plans involving the repatriation of ISIS families. 

‘There’s a lot of anxiety in the community, people are very concerned about this, and if you don’t talk to us how will we work together and do our job,’ he said.

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