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Watch the Harry and Meghan Netflix documentary trailer: The final three episodes

A 30-second teaser of the final three episodes of the Sussexes’ Netflix documentary begins with Meghan Markle apparently describing ‘direct conflict’ within the Royal Family, feeding fears inside Buckingham Palace that ‘next week will be poison’.

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex were accused last night of wanting to ‘bring down the monarchy’ after their documentary made a series of excoriating attacks on Harry’s relatives before turning on Britain and the Commonwealth.

Episode three finished with a teaser for the next volume, due to be released next week. And it gave a clear signal that the final three hours of the series would examine the couple’s decision to quit as working royals and leave Britain.

At its start, over a montage of news footage, including a picture of the couple with the Royal Family at Archie’s baptism,  Meghan can be heard intoning: ‘This is when a family and a family business are in direct conflict.’

A royal insider has warned that ‘next week will be poison’ after the first three episodes of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’s Netflix series aired yesterday 

Harry then declares: ‘Everything that’s happened was always going to happen to us’. Meghan went on, as footage showed her close to tears again: ‘Suddenly what clicked in my head was “It’s never going to stop”.’

Harry, is then shown covering his face with a hand and bowing his head while holding his phone. A pregnant Meghan then hands him a laptop. He then added: ‘There was no other option at this point. I said: “We need to get out of here”.’

The first three episodes of the programme – dubbed ‘Megflix’ by critics and part of a multi-million-dollar deal with the streaming giant – were released yesterday.

Royal insiders were left particularly upset by the criticism of the late Queen Elizabeth and her Commonwealth legacy, which was dismissed as ‘Empire 2.0’.

The Duchess of Sussex described them as an account of the couple’s ‘love story’, but critics said they were a ‘sly and insidious assault’ on Harry’s family and the institution of the Crown.

One royal source told The Times that ‘next week will be poison’, after the first three episodes focused on the British press and Meghan’s treatment by the media before their engagement, as well as the ‘unconscious bias’ surrounding race.

There were calls last night for the Sussexes to give up their titles if they were ‘so ashamed and disappointed’ about their links to the Royal Family, while the royals themselves were said to be ‘in a state of sadness’ after the release. 

Many associated with the Royal Household were also deeply upset at the depth of the couple’s ‘shameful and cowardly’ betrayal of the late Queen.

There were calls last night for the Sussexes to give up their titles if they were ¿so ashamed and disappointed¿ about their links to the Royal Family

There were calls last night for the Sussexes to give up their titles if they were ‘so ashamed and disappointed’ about their links to the Royal Family

The Duchess of Sussex described them as an account of the couple¿s ¿love story¿, but critics said they were a ¿sly and insidious assault¿ on Harry¿s family and the institution of the Crown

The Duchess of Sussex described them as an account of the couple’s ‘love story’, but critics said they were a ‘sly and insidious assault’ on Harry’s family and the institution of the Crown

Harry and Meghan were accused last night of wanting to ¿bring down the monarchy¿ after their Netflix documentary made another excoriating attack on the Royal Family

Harry and Meghan were accused last night of wanting to ‘bring down the monarchy’ after their Netflix documentary made another excoriating attack on the Royal Family

The couple said this selfie was a picture of the moment they decided to give their relationship a go, on their second date, at Soho House in London

The couple said this selfie was a picture of the moment they decided to give their relationship a go, on their second date, at Soho House in London 

It emerged that the couple had started filming themselves and giving interviews as far back as March 2020, and continued until August this year, just weeks before the Queen¿s death

It emerged that the couple had started filming themselves and giving interviews as far back as March 2020, and continued until August this year, just weeks before the Queen’s death

It emerged that the couple had started filming themselves and giving interviews as far back as March 2020, and continued until August this year, just weeks before the Queen’s death. 

A source said: ‘This was all being filmed while both the Duke of Edinburgh and the Queen – Harry’s grandparents – were suffering from serious ill-health and in the last few months of their lives.

‘They even came over to mark Her Majesty’s Jubilee while colluding with the filmmakers, without telling her what they were doing.

‘That’s shameful and cowardly. There are a lot of people who are glad the late Queen is not here to see it.’

Another insider added: ‘It looks as if they want to bring down the monarchy. What else could they hope to achieve by this? It was a sly and insidious attack from start to finish.’

A former royal adviser said the series is an attack on the Queen’s legacy, as opposed to the late monarch herself.  

A row also broke out between Buckingham Palace and Netflix as to whether the royals were given a right of reply against accusations in the documentary.

The first episode started with a disclaimer which stated that: ‘Members of the Royal Family declined to comment on the content within this series.’ But a senior palace source insisted that no one was contacted.

Yesterday’s tell-all documentary saw Harry accusing the royals of having a ‘huge level of unconscious bias’, with Meghan claiming that the Palace co-operated in the planting of ‘salacious stories’ in the media, which wanted to ‘destroy’ her. Other bombshells included:

Prince Harry opens the docu-series from Heathrow as he left the country and frontline royal duties in March 2020

Prince Harry opens the docu-series from Heathrow as he left the country and frontline royal duties in March 2020

Pictured, the couple with their dog in an intimate image shared within the documentary

Pictured, the couple with their dog in an intimate image shared within the documentary

The series reveals the couple started to film themselves on their mobile phones throughout the ‘Megxit’ crisis at the suggestion ‘of a friend’, with some footage dating back to March 2020. 

Harry is shown recording himself in the VIP lounge at Heathrow after his final public engagements as he prepared to leave the UK for the last time as a senior royal. ‘With all of the misinformation that was going on out there, especially about us and the departure, it seemed like a really sensible idea,’ he claims.

Meghan also alleges she received so little support from Buckingham Palace that she had to google the words to the UK’s national anthem.

‘There is no class and some person who goes, “Sit like this, cross your legs like this, use this fork, don’t do this, curtsy then, wear this kind of hat”. It doesn’t happen,’ she says. 

Multiple sources have dismissed this, however, saying she was guided by both the Queen’s trusted deputy private secretary Samantha Cohen and her ladies-in-waiting.

But the most galling part, for many current and ex-staff, is criticism of the late Queen and her passion for the Commonwealth. The group of nations is given the label of ‘Empire 2.0’ by broadcaster Afua Hirsch, while author Kehinde Andrews claims ‘nothing has changed’ from the UK’s colonial past, apart from the Royal Family’s ‘better PR’. 

This description was condemned by sources as ‘appalling and factually inaccurate,’ The Daily Telegraph reported, while another said: ‘Today is a day when you’re reminded that they’re human beings. It’s sad to see it playing out in this way.’ 

There was mounting pressure last night on the Palace – which has so far declined to comment – to publicly condemn Harry and Meghan’s actions.

Conservative MP Bob Seely is leading calls for Harry and Meghan to lose their royal status because the couple are ‘monetising’ their titles with ‘aggressive and unbelievable’ attacks on Britain.

Mr Seely told MailOnline he is tabling a Private Members’ Bill that would give the Privy Council power to downgrade their status.

Meghan and Harry used their $100million (£88million) deal with the streaming giant to launch fresh swipes at the Royal Family and Britain in shows being described as transatlantic ‘TV bombs’ hurled at The Firm. 

There is also a suggestion that the UK is racist and more obsessed with race than the US, with Meghan declaring that she 'wasn't really treated like a black woman' until she came to Britain

There is also a suggestion that the UK is racist and more obsessed with race than the US, with Meghan declaring that she ‘wasn’t really treated like a black woman’ until she came to Britain 

Tory MP Bob Seely told MailOnline he is tabling a Private Members' Bill that would give the Privy Council power to downgrade their status

Tory MP Bob Seely told MailOnline he is tabling a Private Members’ Bill that would give the Privy Council power to downgrade their status

As part of their deal, the privacy-conscious couple have handed over a trove of pictures and video from their relationship including the moment Harry proposed in 2017. 

The first three episodes contain a series of barbs that will upset his father King Charles, including Harry’s claim that there is a ‘huge level of unconscious bias’ in the Royal Family – and a reference to Princess Michael of Kent wearing an offensive Blackamoor-style brooch in front of his wife at Buckingham Palace at a Christmas lunch in 2017. 

There is also a suggestion that the UK is racist and more obsessed with race than the US, with Meghan declaring that she ‘wasn’t really treated like a black woman’ until she came to Britain.

To change the royal couple’s status, legislation would amend the 1917 Titles Deprivation Act that was used to remove honours such as peerages from enemies who supported German aggression in the First World War.

Mr Seely, MP for the Isle of Wight, said the couple were ‘monetising’ their titles with ‘aggressive’ and ‘unbelievable’ attacks on the Royal Family and Britain. 

Backbench Bills rarely become law, but Mr Seely said presenting the proposals to the House will be ‘a start’. 

In the opening scenes, Harry says: 'We've just finished two weeks, out final push, our list stint of royal engagements. It's really hard to look back on it now and go what on earth happened?'

In the opening scenes, Harry says: ‘We’ve just finished two weeks, out final push, our list stint of royal engagements. It’s really hard to look back on it now and go what on earth happened?’

The first episode, which is 56 minutes long, shared the impact of Harry's childhood in the public eye and their secret relationship in the early days. Its Netflix tags were 'Riveting', 'Investigative', and 'Docuseries'

The first episode, which is 56 minutes long, shared the impact of Harry’s childhood in the public eye and their secret relationship in the early days. Its Netflix tags were ‘Riveting’, ‘Investigative’, and ‘Docuseries’

It was business as usual for King Charles yesterday, who appeared in great spirits as he attended a community hub in King's Cross, London

It was business as usual for King Charles yesterday, who appeared in great spirits as he attended a community hub in King’s Cross, London

The first three episodes contain a series of barbs that will upset his father King Charles III, including Harry's claim that there is a 'huge level of unconscious bias' in the Royal Family

The first three episodes contain a series of barbs that will upset his father King Charles III, including Harry’s claim that there is a ‘huge level of unconscious bias’ in the Royal Family

Many associated with the Royal Household were also deeply upset at the depth of the couple¿s ¿shameful and cowardly¿ betrayal of the late Queen. Meghan is pictured with the Queen in Chester in 2018

Many associated with the Royal Household were also deeply upset at the depth of the couple’s ‘shameful and cowardly’ betrayal of the late Queen. Meghan is pictured with the Queen in Chester in 2018

The couple’s bombshell Netflix documentary has been accused of attacking the late Queen’s legacy after branding the Commonwealth ‘Empire 2.0’.  

Commentators in the series suggest this legacy made it difficult for Meghan to be both assimilated into the firm and widely accepted and loved by the British public. 

But the comments have been described as ‘deeply offensive’ by some viewers. 

Harry said: ‘In this family sometimes your part of the problem rather than part of the solution. And there is a huge level of unconscious bias. The thing with unconscious bias is actually no one’s fault.’

Meghan adds: ‘Obviously now everyone is aware of my race because they made it such an issue when I went to the UK. Before then. I wasn’t really treated like a black woman’.

Harry and Meghan kiss in the behind-closed-doors Netflix series. Harry says he made the decision to marry Meghan 'with his heart' because he is 'his mother's son' and claims his wife being an American actress 'clouded' his family's view of her

Harry and Meghan kiss in the behind-closed-doors Netflix series. Harry says he made the decision to marry Meghan ‘with his heart’ because he is ‘his mother’s son’ and claims his wife being an American actress ‘clouded’ his family’s view of her

Harry and Meghan signed lucrative deals, thought to be worth well over £100million, with the streaming giant and Spotify, after quitting as senior working royals in 2020 following family rifts and struggles with royal life

Harry and Meghan signed lucrative deals, thought to be worth well over £100million, with the streaming giant and Spotify, after quitting as senior working royals in 2020 following family rifts and struggles with royal life

The Duchess of Sussex (pictured in 2017 with Harry, Prince Philip and the Princess of Wales, then the Duchess of Cambridge), talks about her first festive season with the Royal Family in her and Prince Harry's new documentary

The Duchess of Sussex (pictured in 2017 with Harry, Prince Philip and the Princess of Wales, then the Duchess of Cambridge), talks about her first festive season with the Royal Family in her and Prince Harry’s new documentary

The first volume of the six-part docuseries dropped on the streaming service yesterday, with three explosive episodes available so far

The first volume of the six-part docuseries dropped on the streaming service yesterday, with three explosive episodes available so far

Harry and Meghan shared pictures of their courtship and their marriage together and with their children

Meghan and Harry share a candid shot with Doria and Archie on his birthday as the privacy-conscious couple released  a stream of family pictures and even texts and emails

Meghan and Harry share a candid shot with Doria and Archie on his birthday as the privacy-conscious couple released  a stream of family pictures and even texts and emails

A pregnant Meghan Markle with her son Archie resting on her bump in the new Netflix series released yesterday

A pregnant Meghan Markle with her son Archie resting on her bump in the new Netflix series released yesterday

Meghan cries on her bed in Vancouver as Harry leaves the UK after Megxit

Meghan and Harry’s Netflix episodes in full 

EPISODE ONE: The Duke of Sussex reveals he ‘had to quit’ royal duties to protect Meghan Markle as he compared the former Suit actress to his late mother Princess Diana in the first episode of the couple’s bombshell Netflix series. 

It features Harry filming himself in the Windsor Suite at Heathrow Airport in March 2020, on the day of Megxit, when the couple decided to leave the royal family. It will inevitably raise questions about just when the couple decided to work with Netflix on their incendiary docuseries.   

It also reveals: 

– Harry said a friend told the couple they should document a period of their lives, which they agreed to due to the ‘misinformation’ about them.

– Harry said he first spotted Meghan on a friend’s Instagram.

– Harry and Meghan said they had their first date at 76 Dean Street – and the Duke was late.

– Meghan’s friend Silver Tree said the Duchess was ‘crazy’ about Harry after meeting him.

– Harry said there is a temptation in the royal family to marry someone who ‘fits the mould’.

– The Duke recalled his childhood was ‘filled with’ laughter, happiness, and adventure, and that he remembers his mother’s ‘cheeky laugh’.

– Harry said: ‘The majority of my memories are of being swarmed by paparazzi.’

– The Duke praised his mother, Diana, for her efforts to ‘protect’ him and his brother from the media.

– Harry said his mother was ‘compelled’ to talk about her life.

EPISODE TWO:  Features Meghan’s mother, Doria, speaking on camera for the first time about her daughter’s relationship with Prince Harry. 

She tells interviewers the last five years have been ‘challenging’ but is ‘ready to have my voice heard’. 

It also reveals:  

– The Duke said members of the royal family asked why Meghan should be ‘protected’ or given ‘special treatment’ when they questioned newspaper headlines about her.

– Harry said negative press coverage about Meghan had a ‘race element’.

– Meghan’s mother Doria Ragland told of paparazzi taking pictures of deprived neighbourhoods in Los Angeles and saying that was where she was from.

– The Duke said articles in the press had ‘racist undertones’ as well as ‘outright racism’.

– Harry went on to talk about his children, saying he is ‘really proud’ they are mixed race.

– The Duke said he and the Duchess of Sussex were keen ‘not to make the same mistakes our parents did’ while bringing up their children.

– The King’s second son said the early stages of dating were ‘car chases, anti-surveillance driving and disguises’.

– Meghan found the ‘formality’ of being in the royal family ‘surprising’, saying she realised people in the UK found hugging ‘really jarring’.

– The Duke of Sussex described how Meghan meeting the Queen for the first time was a ‘shock to the system’, saying it was ‘weird’ telling her to curtsy to his grandmother.

– Harry said his wife being an American actress ‘clouded’ his family’s view of her.

– The Duchess of Sussex said the media would find a way to ‘destroy’ her ‘no matter how good’ she was.

EPISODE THREE:  Harry and Meghan call their engagement announcement in 2017 an ‘orchestrated reality show’ – and experts take aim at the ‘racist’ history of the British empire, and its Kings and Queens.

It also reveals:   

– Harry believes there is a ‘huge level of unconscious bias’ in the royal family.

– Meghan claimed stories were ‘planted’ in the lead up to their wedding, with the couple ‘playing whack-a-mole’ with the press.

– Meghan described the time around their engagement as an ‘orchestrated reality show’, adding their interview after the announcement was ‘rehearsed’.

– Harry said he ‘shoulders’ the responsibility for the breakdown of Meghan’s relationship with her father.

– Harry said his time in the Army helped ‘burst’ the bubble of life in the royal family.

– Meghan claimed her elder half-sister Samantha Markle exaggerated the extent of their relationship.

– Meghan revealed her son Archie’s favourite song is Bennie And The Jets by Sir Elton John.

– Meghan discovered her father was going to attend her wedding ‘through a tabloid’.

Under the so-called ‘Megxit’ deal agreed in 2020, Harry and Meghan are still known as the Duke and Duchess of Sussex.

They kept their ‘HRH’ prefix – His Royal Highness and Her Royal Highness – but said they would no longer ‘actively use’ the titles.

‘If this guy hates the royals so much what is he doing parading and using his titles?’ Mr Seely said. 

‘If Harry and Meghan had integrity and wanted to practice what they preach – if they think the Royal Family is so awful why do they use Royal titles when it benefits them?’ 

He added: ‘I do think it is the decent thing for them to do to voluntarily give up their titles. If they don’t I think there are various people trying to put down Bills helping them to do that.’

Separately, Labour’s Rachael Maskell is putting forward similar legislation targeting the Duke of York.

Mr Seely said: ‘The way that Harry and Meghan are going, the idea that you can sit there and monetise your misery, monetise your royal status by attacking the royal family – I’m sorry I think something has got to give.

‘It is just very sad for them that they are parading their deep sense of victimhood when I think actually they are remarkably, remarkably privileged people.

‘Rather than telling people how miserable they are they should be actually helping others.

‘I don’t for one second believe that the Royal family is ”racist”.

‘I think it is highly dishonest and really quite unattractive to claim that. I suspect it is to justify their Netflix deal.

‘They have not got much to say. What they have said they have said before. So they are just saying the same thing in a more aggressive and frankly unbelievable way. I don’t believe a word of it.

‘I think so many people in this country are getting fed up with them and how they use their royal status to make tens of millions of dollars.’

In one segment of the documentary, Harry says the royal family has ‘unconscious bias’, and is ‘part of the problem’ when it comes to racism in Britain. 

Other parts of the show feature left-leaning academics commenting on Britain’s colonial history and calling the late Queen’s Commonwealth ‘Empire 2.0’, and it also accuses Brexit supporters of being racist and having ‘horrible views. 

A senior Tory told MailOnline: ‘Meghan needs to get this massive chip off her shoulder. The world has a problem with racism.

‘Every country has a problem with racism, every single country. The UK is no exception.

‘It is a problem in the UK that is becoming increasingly less. We have Rishi Sunak as PM.

‘It seems to me that she has been walking around, and Harry too, actively looking to interpret things from a racist angle when actually they may well not have been racist.’ 

‘For Harry to talk about racist Britain, and a racist Royal Family… if they were racist they wouldn’t have allowed him to marry her.

‘He himself went into exile.

‘They have opted to bow out of royal life… but it is ironic that they are making their money by trashing the very institution they have walked away from. They should try to make their money without involving the Royal Family.’

Nigel Farage also joined the criticism, branding Harry and Meghan ‘despicable’ after their bombshell Netflix documentary suggested Brexit contributed to the racism experienced by the Duchess. 

The former UKIP leader, 58, took to social media to give his verdict following the release of the first three of six hour-long episodes, which were dropped by the streaming giant at 8am on Thursday. 

He accused the Sussexes of labelling 52 per cent of Brits ‘bad, racist people’, after one of the episodes said it created a ‘perfect storm for jingoism and nationalism’ and gave people with ‘really horrible views more strength and confidence’. 

Downing Street also pushed back against the efforts to show’s efforts to link Brexit to racism. 

Asked about Prince Harry’s comments about the EU referendum, Rishi Sunak’s spokesman said: ‘I haven’t put those specific points to the Prime Minister but the British people made a decision, a democratic decision, which the Government has enacted based on taking control of things like our borders and our laws, which again, we have delivered.’ 

Tory MP Michael Fabricant also weighed in, accusing the Sussexes of recycling the ‘ignorant trope’ that all Brexiteers ‘are racists’.

Mr Farage added: ‘Well perhaps no great surprise that Harry and Meghan choose to use Brexit as one of the causes of the terrible racism that was put against them.

‘They draw on extreme Left-wing historians, they draw on fake news headlines from The Guardian and elsewhere and what they’re really saying is that 52% of Prince Harry’s country of birth are  bad, racist people.’

He said the series was, in the short term, all about ‘making money’, ‘dissing the Royal Family and the United Kingdom’, adding: ‘And in the long term, giving a political platform on which Meghan can launch her career in the USA.’ 

He said the couple are ‘nothing short of despicable’ over their ‘behaviour’ towards the Royal Family.  

Nigel Farage (pictured), the former UKIP leader, 58, took to social media to give his verdict following the release of the first three of six hour-long episodes, which were dropped by the streaming giant at 8am on Thursday

Nigel Farage (pictured), the former UKIP leader, 58, took to social media to give his verdict following the release of the first three of six hour-long episodes, which were dropped by the streaming giant at 8am on Thursday

Tory MP Michael Fabricant (pictured) also weighed in, accusing the Sussexes of recycling the 'ignorant trope' that all Brexiteers 'are racists'

Tory MP Michael Fabricant (pictured) also weighed in, accusing the Sussexes of recycling the ‘ignorant trope’ that all Brexiteers ‘are racists’

Mr Fabricant told MailOnline: ‘It is a common and ignorant trope that people who voted for Brexit did so out of racism.

‘Most did so because they believed in the importance of sovereignty for our 1,000-year-old nation.

‘You would have thought Prince Harry would have had some sense of history, but I guess not. Instead he chooses to make ill-informed comments based on his own prejudices rather than any basis of facts.’

Lengthy segments in the series are also given to academics Afua Hirsch and David Olusoga who say British tradition is ‘filled with racist imagery’ while discussing the country’s colonial legacy – and call anti-immigration sentiment in the UK a ‘cipher for race’.

The accusations are levelled across the first three hour-long episodes of Harry & Meghan, which dropped at 8am on Thursday. 

The Commonwealth, much-loved by the late Queen, is branded ‘Empire 2.0’ by Ms Hirsch, while author Kehinde Andrews claims ‘nothing has changed’ from the UK’s colonial past, apart from the Royal Family’s ‘better PR’. 

The commentators suggest this racist legacy made it difficult for Meghan to be both assimilated into the firm and widely accepted and loved by the British public. 

Mr Farage accused the Sussexes of labelling 52% of Brits 'bad, racist people', after one of the episodes said it created a 'perfect storm for jingoism and nationalism' and gave people with 'really horrible views more strength and confidence'

Mr Farage accused the Sussexes of labelling 52% of Brits ‘bad, racist people’, after one of the episodes said it created a ‘perfect storm for jingoism and nationalism’ and gave people with ‘really horrible views more strength and confidence’

Harry and Meghan have branded their engagement announcement in 2017 an 'orchestrated reality show' in episode three of their bombshell Netflix documentary

Harry and Meghan have branded their engagement announcement in 2017 an ‘orchestrated reality show’ in episode three of their bombshell Netflix documentary

Author Afua Hirsch (pictured) brands the Commonwealth Empire 2.0 in Harry and Meghan's Netflix documentary, before describing Harry as 'anti-racist'

Author Afua Hirsch (pictured) brands the Commonwealth Empire 2.0 in Harry and Meghan’s Netflix documentary, before describing Harry as ‘anti-racist’ 

Ten claims made about Britain’s ‘racism problem’ and ‘painful’ colonial legacy in the Harry and Meghan Netflix documentary

  • Prince Harry says the Royal Family suffers from ‘unconscious bias’ and is ‘often part of the problem’ when it comes to racism in the UK 
  • David Olusoga says UK had ‘pretty toxic debate about the EU’ and adds that ‘immigration was at the absolute centre’ and ‘is very often in this country a cipher for race’ 
  • Harry referenced an EU report that warned the Brexit debate was fueling a  ‘culture war…[that] was going to become huge and a real problem’ 
  • Academic Afua Hirsch says: ‘if you go into a palace or a stately home or anywhere that represents tradition you are likely to be faced with racist imagery’ 
  • Hirsch also calls the Commonwealth is ‘Empire 2.0’. She said its description as a ‘club of friends who share common values’ is ‘problematic’
  • Ms Hirsch says Britain thinks of its ‘painful’ colonial past as ‘all history’ and that there’s ‘no point looking back’, while ‘those in Britain who extracted wealth’ from colonies ‘continue to be inter-generationally wealthy’
  • Author Kehinde Andrews says  ‘nothing has changed’ from the UK’s colonial past, apart from the Royal Family’s ‘better PR’ 
  • Ex-Palace spokesman James Holt said Brexit provided the ‘perfect storm’ that ‘gave credence to jingoism and nationalism and gave people with really horrible views of the world a little bit more strength and confidence’
  • Meghan said people made ‘such an issue’ of her race when she moved to the UK, adding: ‘Before that, most people didn’t treat me like a ”black woman.”’
  • Mr Olusoga said the fact that slave owners were compensated ‘for their human property’ is often ‘left out’ of history lessons, which he said is ‘just another way in which our memory of British slavery has been airbrushed out’
  • Mr Holt says he was ‘oblivious’ to the legacy of the slave trade, claiming his teachers neglected to tell the full story and focused on the UK’s colonial power and ‘just how important the country used to be globally’ 

Even the UK’s departure from the EU is dragged into the fray, as Harry says the series is not ‘just about our story’, adding: ‘This has always been much bigger than us’, amid the back drop of a Brexit protest followed by former-PM Boris Johnson vowing to ‘take back control of this country.’ 

The visuals point to racism being a key factor behind the Brexit vote and suggest the wider political climate was hostile to Meghan becoming a royal. 

The debate around Brexit is revisited at the end of episode two. Mr Olusoga says that the ‘fairy tale’ of Harry and Meghan was ’embedding itself in a nation that is having a pretty toxic debate about the European Union.’

He adds that ‘immigration was at the absolute centre’ of that debate, and that ‘immigration is very often in this country a cipher for race’.

A series of clips then shows British people making racist comments.

Harry then says: ‘So the EU commissioned a report in 2016, exactly the same time that our relationship became public. It warned that if the government wasn’t going to do something, or if the media aren’t going to sort themselves out, that a culture war that had already existed was going to become huge and become a real problem.’

Former Palace spokesman James Holt adds: ‘It was a perfect storm that gave credence to jingoism and nationalism and gave people with really horrible views of the world a little bit more strength and confidence to say what they wanted to say and do what they wanted to do.’ 

In the same episode, Meghan tells interviewers she felt a shift in treatment after moving to the UK. 

‘At that time, I wasn’t thinking about how race played a part in any of this,’ she said. ‘I genuinely didn’t think about it.

‘It’s very different to be a minority but not be treated as a minority right off the bat… I’d say now, people are very aware of my race because they made it such an issue when I went to the UK. 

‘But before that, most people didn’t treat me like a ”black woman.” So that talk didn’t happen for me.’

In the third episode, the Sussexes chart their relationship with the media from the announcement of their engagement in 2017 right up until the day before their wedding in May 2018. 

It touches on Britain’s ‘racist past’ and various scandals to have hit the firm in recent years – including Princess Michael of Kent’s ‘Blackamoor-style’ brooch and Harry’s Nazi uniform furore. 

Experts, authors and friends – including Meghan’s mother Doria Ragland and Serena Williams – are called upon to comment on how Britain’s history, the press and expectations from royal fans impacted the couple. 

In the opening segment, Meghan claims ‘we’ve never been allowed to tell our story… until now’.

Mr Olusoga, author of Black and British, then tells interviewers: ‘Who dreamed that Britain would have a black princess? Who could have conceived that? It was the conclusion to a history that was so improbable, as to be astonishing.’ 

He and fellow author Afua Hirsch give a brief history lesson on Britain’s role in the Atlantic Slave trade and how it ‘fuelled’ the British empire, which was ‘financed by kings and queens right up until its abolishment’ in the early 1800s. 

Ms Hirsch said Britain is often described of having its ‘own deep south’ that was ‘just as brutal’ as the US’s and that ‘actually enslaved more Africans’ than the Americans did, but that that deep south was the Caribbean. 

But ‘it was out of sight and out of mind,’ she said, adding that the first slave voyage was ‘personally financed’ by Queen Elizabeth I and continued to be financed by kings and queens until abolishment. 

'Send them back home': A man spouting anti-immigration rhetoric is featured in Harry and Meghan's Netflix documentary after a section about Brexit

‘Send them back home’: A man spouting anti-immigration rhetoric is featured in Harry and Meghan’s Netflix documentary after a section about Brexit 

'Go back to Africa': A racial attack on a bus is featured in Harry and Meghan's Netflix documentary

‘Go back to Africa’: A racial attack on a bus is featured in Harry and Meghan’s Netflix documentary 

Even the UK's departure from the EU is dragged into the fray, as Harry says the series is not 'just about our story', adding: 'This has always been much bigger than us', amid the back drop of a Brexit protest (pictured) followed by former-PM Boris Johnson vowing to 'take back control of this country'

Even the UK’s departure from the EU is dragged into the fray, as Harry says the series is not ‘just about our story’, adding: ‘This has always been much bigger than us’, amid the back drop of a Brexit protest (pictured) followed by former-PM Boris Johnson vowing to ‘take back control of this country’ 

Lengthy segments are also given to academics Afua Hirsch and David Olusoga (pictured) who say British tradition is 'filled with racist imagery' and say anti-immigration sentiment is a 'cipher for race'

Lengthy segments are also given to academics Afua Hirsch and David Olusoga (pictured) who say British tradition is ‘filled with racist imagery’ and say anti-immigration sentiment is a ‘cipher for race’

The process of stripping titles for Prince Harry and Meghan, the Duke and Duchess of Sussex

Harry and Meghan have the titles as Duke and Duchess of Sussex, which were bestowed by the late Queen, Harry’s grandmother, when the couple married in 2018, along with his subsidiary titles as Earl of Dumbarton and Baron Kilkeel.

Stripping titles creates  a constitutional problem, royal experts have said. 

They warned that if the Sussexes’ titles as Duke and Duchess were revoked, Harry would still be entitled to be addressed as Prince Harry, as he is a prince by birth. That situation would see Meghan automatically become Princess Harry (or strictly Princess Henry). 

The couple retain but no longer use their HRH titles after they quit as working royals, but Harry remains fifth in line to the throne. 

King Charles can remove the title HRH. It was done when Diana divorced from the then Prince of Wales.

There is currently no mechanism for the title of a Duke or Duchess to be removed, but Rachael Maskell, Labour MP for York Central, is seeking to address the gap in the law via her Removal of Titles Bill.

It aims to give the monarch new powers to remove titles or a committee of Parliament to determine that a title should be taken away.

Tory MP Bob Seely is also tabling a Private Members’ Bill that would give the Privy Council power to downgrade their status. 

To change the royal couple’s status, legislation would amend the 1917 Titles Deprivation Act that was used to remove honours such as peerages from enemies who supported German aggression in the First World War.   

According to Mr Olusoga, the fact that slave owners were then compensated to the tune of £20million ‘for their human property’ is often ‘left out’ of history lessons, which he said is ‘just another way in which our memory of British slavery has been airbrushed out of Britain’s story.’ 

James Holt, former Palace spokesman, tells producers he was ‘oblivious’ to the legacy of Britain’s links to the slave trade, claiming his teachers focused on the UK’s colonial power and ‘just how important the country used to be globally.’ 

Linking back to Harry and Meghan’s engagement, Mr Olusoga says he felt it could have shown the Royal Family had ‘caught up with the rest of Britain.’ 

Then recalling her first Christmas at Sandringham, Meghan said she found it ‘amazing’ as she was ‘with a big family like I always wanted’. 

But things went awry when reports emerged that the Princess Michael of Kent wore a ‘Blackamoor-style’ brooch to the Queen’s annual Christmas lunch  – which was widely viewed as ‘racist’. 

Harry then says: ‘In this family, sometimes you are part of the problem rather than part of the solution. There is a huge level of unconscious bias.

‘The thing with unconscious bias, it is actually no one’s fault. But once it has been pointed out, or identified within yourself you then need to make it right.

‘It is education. It is awareness. It is a constant work in progress for everybody, including me.’

Harry then spoke about when he wore a Nazi uniform to a private party in 2005.

He said: ‘It was probably one of the biggest mistakes of my life. I felt so ashamed afterwards. All I wanted to do was make it right.’

The episode later reverts back to Britain’s colonial past as it gives a brief description of the founding of the Commonwealth. 

Author Robert Hazell says the British monarchy is unique in that it is an ‘international monarchy’ as the King is the head of state in countries around the world. 

The commonwealth is described as one the great ‘justifications’ for the continuation of the monarchy, but author Kehinde Andrews says nothing has changed since colonisation, only that the royal family uses ‘better PR’.

Britain played a ‘very strategic’ role in awarding former colonies independence, Ms Hirsch tells viewers, ‘in a way that protected its commercial and capitalist interests.’ 

James Holt (pictured), former Palace spokesman, tells producers he was 'oblivious' to the legacy of Britain's links to the slave trade, claiming his teachers focused on the UK's colonial power and 'just how important the country used to be globally.'

James Holt (pictured), former Palace spokesman, tells producers he was ‘oblivious’ to the legacy of Britain’s links to the slave trade, claiming his teachers focused on the UK’s colonial power and ‘just how important the country used to be globally.’

Harry and Meghan during an interview after announcing their engagement in 2017

Harry and Meghan during an interview after announcing their engagement in 2017

The third episode touches on Britain's 'racist past' and various scandals to have hit the firm in recent years - including Princess Michael of Kent's 'Blackamoor-style' brooch (pictured) and Harry's Nazi uniform furore

The third episode touches on Britain’s ‘racist past’ and various scandals to have hit the firm in recent years – including Princess Michael of Kent’s ‘Blackamoor-style’ brooch (pictured) and Harry’s Nazi uniform furore

She said it created a ‘privileged club of formerly colonised nations called the Commonwealth’, which she said is still described as a ‘club of friends who share common values’. 

She adds: ‘I find that language really problematic, I sometimes call the Commonwealth Empire 2.0, because that is what it is.’ 

Mr Andrews then adds: ‘They’ve not changed a thing, they’ve just got better PR. If you look at the black people in the Commonwealth the conditions are almost just as bad as they were 50 years ago or 100 years ago.’ 

Ms Hirsch says the former colonies’ wealth was ‘extracted’ and that this is the root of the poverty plaguing some of the communities today. 

She adds: ‘Those in Britain who extracted that wealth continue to be inter-generationally wealthy, those from whom it was extracted continue to be inter-generationally poor. It is a very clear economic relationship.

‘And yet the current narrative in Britain is that it’s all history and there’s no point looking back. It’s incredibly painful for the very many millions of British people who have a different memory of empire in their personal background.’  

‘And yet here was a woman who just looked like most of the people in the Commonwealth,’ author Mr Olusoga added, ‘Meghan represented something… there was a hope that maybe this was a way of having these difficult conversations that had been pushed away so many times.’ 

The episode then tells the story of the murder of Stephen Lawrence and shows Harry speaking at a memorial to him, 26 days before his and Meghan’s wedding.

Ms Hirsch said the black community ‘really appreciated’ his speech, saying his and Meghan’s attendance was ‘really significant’. 

She added: ‘It represented a direct attempt to speak to the pain many people still feel as a result of the murder of Stephen Lawrence.

‘And that was really welcomed by many black communities in Britain. I always perceived Prince Harry as just another senior royal, a little bit racist, very ignorant. 

‘But I have watched him on this journey and seen that he has really embraced the education that is required for someone like him to transform himself into an anti-racist.’

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Read more at DailyMail.co.uk



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