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Weather warning to dog owners after three are trapped in roasting cars during blistering heatwave 

Police have been forced to smash their way into people’s cars to free dogs trapped in the scorching heat. 

Officers spotted one poorly pooch left inside a car in Plymouth city centre for three hours yesterday afternoon. 

Left yelping on his own during the hottest hours of the day between 2pm and 4pm, locals were appalled the pet had been left locked inside the vehicle. 

The dog bounded out as soon as he was freed, relieved to be in the cooler air, while his owners were less pleased as they returned to find their windows smashed. 

At a Sainsbury’s in Leeds and a Tesco in Cambridgeshire, shoppers were also left horrified by the sight of canines stuck in two sweltering vehicles yesterday.

Police officers in Plymouth had to smash their way into a car yesterday to free a dog locked inside for more than three hours 

In Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, yesterday 19-year-old Rebecca Cox spotted a border terrier panting inside a car inside a Tesco's car park

In Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, yesterday 19-year-old Rebecca Cox spotted a border terrier panting inside a car inside a Tesco’s car park

In Leeds yesterday shoppers in Sainsbury's were asked which customer had left their dog stuck in a car as officers threatened to break their way in

In Leeds yesterday shoppers in Sainsbury’s were asked which customer had left their dog stuck in a car as officers threatened to break their way in

An announcement was made over the tannoy at Sainsbury’s in Colton Retail Park after police spotted a dog trapped inside with the window only slightly ajar.  

Sgt Micklethwaite on Twitter: ‘In the space of less than 10 minutes the dog was starting to pant / overheat. Just don’t do it.’

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Meanwhile in Wisbech, Cambridgeshire, a border terrier was spotted by 19-year-old Rebecca Cox at a Tesco car park in Cromwell Road yesterday evening.  

The teen rang the police, but when she was on the phone the owner dashed back and drove off.

She claimed the dog was ‘panting and lying down’ while it was trapped inside and was gravely concerned for its safety. 

While it is not illegal to leave an animal unattended, if the heat of the car causes it to die or become unwell, owners could be prosecuted for animal cruelty. 

Charles Cross Policing Team said of yesterday’s incident in Plymouth: ‘Another dog left in the sun, another window smashed! 

‘This little guy was alone for over 3 hours. If you love your furry friends, please THINK. He was very happy to be set free! #DogsDieInHotCars’

Fellow dog owners in the area were outraged, claiming the owners ‘don’t deserve dogs’ and the images ‘broke their hearts. 

One person wrote: ‘Well done who made the call, well done officers, STUPID human who left that lovely dog in this vehicle.’

Another commented: ‘This breaks my heart, I get so angry why do people do this ?!!! They don’t deserve dogs !’

Someone else posted on Twitter: ‘It’s bad enough when people take their dogs out when it’s this hot, but leaving them in the car?! They should be banned from keeping animals full stop.’ 

PCSO Tracy Cunningham said the family got back to their car just as it was due to be taken away.

She said: ‘They weren’t happy with us because their window was put in.’ 

The owners were spoken to via an intrepter over the phone, who explained why the police have the power to free dogs who could risk perishing in the heat.

The dog was checked over by the RSPCA and is now with a vet.   

Dogs Trust says on a 71.6F (22C) day, the temperature inside a car could rise by 11C in just 10 minutes and because dogs cannot cool down the same way as humans, the heat can quickly become dangerous for them.

Earlier this week an American Bulldog Finlay was left fighting for his life after his body temperature soared to a life-threatening 42.2C (108F) during recent hot weather.

Earlier this week an American Bulldog Finlay was left fighting for his life after his body temperature soared to a life-threatening 42.2C (108F) during recent hot weather

Earlier this week an American Bulldog Finlay was left fighting for his life after his body temperature soared to a life-threatening 42.2C (108F) during recent hot weather

The one-year-old – who was born with three legs – became overheated when his owner took him to a park in Glasgow.

The charity has advised not walking dogs at the hottest times of the day. But it said early morning or later in the evening walks are best accompanied with water.

It has also said tarmac can get ‘very hot in the sun’ and advises owners ‘to check it with their hand before letting dogs walk on it so they don’t burn their paws’.

Other tips that have been given are avoiding long car journeys, using a sun blind for shade, avoiding congested roads as much as possible and taking regular breaks and having plenty of water on board.

Dogs Trust veterinary director, Paula Boyden, said: ‘There are so many things we can do to make sure our dogs stay happy and healthy in hot weather, but it is crucial we keep a close eye on them, even if we are playing indoors. 

‘If we all do this, then hopefully we and our dogs will be able to enjoy a long hot summer.’

Have you taken any pictures of the hot weather? Email them to pictures@mailonline.co.uk or share your heatwave stories by emailing lara.keay@mailonline.co.uk or calling 0203 615 1637

What should you do if you see a dog locked in a car on a hot day? 

The RSPCA recommends not being afraid of dialing 999 when seeing a dog in a car on a hot day and offers the following advice on what to do: 

Never leave your dog alone in a car on a warm day. If you see a dog in distress in a hot car, dial 999. Many people still believe that it’s ok to leave a dog in a car on a warm day if the windows are left open or they’re parked in the shade, but the truth is, it’s still a very dangerous situation for the dog.

A car can become as hot as an oven very quickly, even when it doesn’t feel that warm. When it’s 22 degrees, in a car it can reach an unbearable 47 degrees within the hour.

What to do if you see a dog in a car on a warm day:

In an emergency, we may not be able to attend quickly enough, and with no powers of entry, we’d need police assistance at such an incident.

Don’t be afraid to dial 999, the police will inform us if animal welfare assistance is required.

Help a dog in a hot car:

  • Establish the animal’s health and condition. If they’re displaying any signs of heatstroke dial 999 immediately.
  • If the situation becomes critical for the dog and the police are too far away or unable to attend, many people’s instinct will be to break into the car to free the dog. If you decide to do this, please be aware that without proper justification, this could be classed as criminal damage and, potentially, you may need to defend your actions in court.
  • Make sure you tell the police what you intend to do and why. Take pictures or videos of the dog and the names and numbers of witnesses to the incident. The law states that you have a lawful excuse to commit damage if you believe that the owner of the property that you damage would consent to the damage if they knew the circumstances (section 5(2)(a) Criminal Damage Act 1971).

Once removed, if the dog is displaying signs of heatstroke, follow our emergency first aid advice. This could mean the difference between life and death for the dog.

If the dog isn’t displaying symptoms of heatstroke:

  • Establish how long the dog has been in the car. A ‘pay and display’ ticket could help.
  • Make a note of the car’s registration. If the owner returns, but you still feel the situation was dangerous for the dog, you may still report the incident to the police.
  • If you’re at a shop, venue or event ask the staff to make an announcement to alert the owner of the situation.
  • If possible, get someone to stay with the dog to monitor their condition. If they begin to display signs of distress or heatstroke, be prepared to dial 999.
  • You can also call our 24-hour cruelty line for advice on 0300 1234 999. However, if the dog’s in danger, dialing 999 should always be the first step.

The ultimate heatwave hacks: From ice packs on heads to DIY air conditioning – how Britons and their beloved pets are keeping cool on what is set to be the hottest day UK history

As Britain boil on what could be the hottest day in history, people up and down the country are trying everything they can to cope in the heat.

From fans on the London Underground to ice packs and cold flannels strapped to people’s foreheads, Britons are resorting to desperate measures to keep themselves and their beloved pets cool.  

Thousands of workers abandoned the office in favour of working from home, where they fashioned garden desks complete with ice-cold drinks and paddling pools. 

Those who had to brave the sticky morning commute bought ice lollies for their colleagues and propped open doors in the absence of air conditioning.

Pet owners are making sure their furry friends don’t overheat by plonking them in front of fans and putting ice cubes in their water bowls.  

The mercury is expected to rise to 102.2F (39C) in London and the south east today, which would be the hottest day since records began. 

People are strapping ice packs to their foreheads to keep cool

One office propped open doors in the absence of air conditioning

People are strapping ice packs to their foreheads to keep cool and propping open doors at work on what could be the hottest UK day ever

Those working from home plonked their pets in front of desk fans to stop them overheating. Ross put his pooch Twiggy where he would stay the coolest

Those working from home plonked their pets in front of desk fans to stop them overheating. Ross put his pooch Twiggy where he would stay the coolest 

Public Health England advised people to put their bed sheets in the freezer before they went to bed last night, leaving windows wide open and fans up the max.  

This morning staff at Nottingham Hospital decided to make the most of the blistering conditions by putting a batch of cookies on the dashboard of a car to cook them in the heat. 

Have you taken any pictures of the hot weather?

Email them to pictures@mailonline.co.uk 

Share your heatwave stories by emailing lara.keay@mailonline.co.uk or ringing 0203 615 1637

Women feeling the heat on their chests have also been investing in ‘freezable bras’ that have ice pack padding.

Their cotton covers means customers are spared from any embarrassing leaks.

In the shops, rose wine is flying off the shelves as the temperature rises. 

Currys PC World say fan sales are up 200 per cent while John Lewis and Partners reported selling six fans a minute yesterday.

The department store has also seen sales of temperature balancing bedding soar by 76 per cent while linen sheet sales are up 82 per cent.

Laurence Mitchell, electricals buying director at John Lewis, said: ‘Sales of fans are up 120 per cent and we’ve seen strong demand for handheld fans in particular which are an ideal way to keep cool on the move.’

Staff at a hospital in Nottingham decided to make the most of the blistering conditions by putting a batch of cookies on the dashboard of a car to cook in the heat

Staff at a hospital in Nottingham decided to make the most of the blistering conditions by putting a batch of cookies on the dashboard of a car to cook in the heat

 

Eyna the trainee hearing dog made sure to avoid sticky surfaces as she relaxed this morning

Eyna the trainee hearing dog made sure to avoid sticky surfaces as she relaxed this morning

Brac the Welsh Terrier was pictured by his owner licking an ice cube in a desperate bid to stay cool

Brac the Welsh Terrier was pictured by his owner licking an ice cube in a desperate bid to stay cool 

These piglets at Pennywell Farm in Devon were given their lunch inside an ice cube yesterday

These piglets at Pennywell Farm in Devon were given their lunch inside an ice cube yesterday

Currys said Dyson and Logik Pedestal models are also clocking up a lot of interest online.

A Dyson model was visible in a window at Buckingham Palace when the Queen met Boris Johnson to be sworn in as Prime Minister yesterday.

Waitrose shoppers have provided the supermarket with two of its biggest weeks ever for sales of rose wine while also sending sales of English sparkling wine up 71 per cent and Champagne up 27 per cent.

Wine buyer Rebecca Hull said: ‘We closely monitor the weather as a rise in temperature of even just a few degrees will see a change in what our customers are shopping for.

‘We are anticipating a rush on rose this week as the weather is set to warm up and bottles of fizz are making their way into ice buckets across the country.’

This man set up his own beach spot on Blackfriars Bridge in central London yesterday

This man set up his own beach spot on Blackfriars Bridge in central London yesterday 

Workers bought ice cream for en masse to make sure they keep cool in the office today

Workers bought ice cream for en masse to make sure they keep cool in the office today 

These two made sure they had cold packs on their heads within minutes of waking up this morning

These two made sure they had cold packs on their heads within minutes of waking up this morning

Superdrug reported sales of cooling sprays rising by 116 per cent on Monday compared to Sunday in preparation for the heatwave, while sales of deodorants and body sprays were up 26 per cent week on week following the temperature increase.

Meanwhile, Halfords warned drivers to get their car’s air conditioning checked.

Aaron Edwards, from Halfords Autocentres, said: ‘Dirt can build up in your car’s air con system and can also be a breeding ground for other microorganisms which can cause allergic reactions.

‘It can be easily solved by taking your car in for an air conditioning clean which is designed to remove bacteria that has built up over time.

‘We also recommend changing your car’s pollen filter regularly to keep your car free from irritants.’

Have you taken any pictures of the hot weather? Email them to pictures@mailonline.co.uk or share your heatwave stories by emailing lara.keay@mailonline.co.uk or calling 0203 615 1637 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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