News, Culture & Society

What new charges come in on January 1 2019

There’s a range of price rises – and the odd cut – that will come into force in Australia on January 1, 2019.    

t’s good news for those keen to borrow money, with a range of measures being brought in to make borrowing fairer.

But regular motorist will be hit, again, with toll hikes on roads in three different states.

Some new mums will benefit from a government baby bundle designed to help them get through the first days of motherhood.

While women will be able to buy tax-free tampons for the first time.

Here is a complete rundown of the price rises that come into force from Tuesday, January 1 – and how they will impact your bank account.

Australians can expect a raft of changes from January 1, including cheaper feminine hygiene products, an increase in car tolls and train fares and cheaper gas and electricity

ROAD TOLLS 

It’s bad news for motorists as road toll operators plan to increase prices in Brisbane, Melbourne and Sydney. 

Cars travelling northbound in Sydney’s Eastern Distributor toll road will have to pay an extra seven cents from $7.46 to $7.53. 

The toll for cars travelling on the Hills M2 Motorway, which runs from the city’s far north-west, tolls will increase between two and seven cents, depending on the exit taken. 

Cars entering the M2 from the Windsor Road ramp will pay $2.64, up from $2.61. 

Car tolls across Sydney, Melbourne and Victoria will increase from two to ten cents 

Car tolls across Sydney, Melbourne and Victoria will increase from two to ten cents 

The Sydney toll price rise comes despite motorists already being hit by a rise in October 1, just three months ago. 

In Brisbane, car tolls on the AirportLinkM7 increase by 10 cents from $5.46 to $5.56. 

Melbourne cars on CityLink will pay an extra one to four cents for tolls. 

PUBLIC TRANSPORT FARES 

 Train, tram and bus fares will increase across Victoria, with the two-hour full-fare tickets increasing from $4.30 to $4.40, while all-day tickets will cost $8.80, up from $8.60.

Meanwhile, the annual full-fare Myki passes will increase from $1,683.50 to $1,722.50, while the concession pass will rise from $841.75 to $861.25. 

Two-hour full-fare tickets and all-day tickets will increase by ten cents while an annual full-fare Myki pass will cost $1,722.50 from $1,683.50

Two-hour full-fare tickets and all-day tickets will increase by ten cents while an annual full-fare Myki pass will cost $1,722.50 from $1,683.50

In Brisbane, a single-zone ticket will increase from $4.70 to $4.80 and an eight-zone ticket will increase from $28.40 to $28.90 for adults, from January 7. 

New South Wales introduced transport fare adjustments in July, adding about 39 cents a week to the average commuter’s bill. 

TAMPON TAX AXED 

Women’s tampons, pads and panty liners will be exempt from the 10% goods and services tax (GST) from January 1. 

The move comes after Treasurer Josh Frydenberg secured an agreement from state treasurers to axe the ‘tampon tax’ in October – which will cost Treasury about $30 million every year.   

Female sanitary products such as tampons, pads and panty liners will be exempted from the ten per cent goods and services tax (GST)

Female sanitary products such as tampons, pads and panty liners will be exempted from the ten per cent goods and services tax (GST)

Nicotene patches, sunscreen and Viagra are among other health products exempt from GST.  

PLASTIC BAG BANS AND PENALTIES   

All plastic bags with handles with a thickness of 35 microns or less, even if they are biodegradable, will be completely banned in Western Australia. 

The ban applies to all retailers and not just major supermarkets. 

Any retailer, which refuses to comply with the ban can face potential prosecution and fines up to $5,000. 

Western Australia will introduce a complete plastic bag ban, which applies to all retailers including take-away restaurants and not just supermarkets 

Western Australia will introduce a complete plastic bag ban, which applies to all retailers including take-away restaurants and not just supermarkets 

‘From January 1, 2019 it will be an offence for retailers to supply lightweight plastic bags – this includes small retail shops, takeaway food outlets and markets,’ said WA environment minister Stephen Dawson. 

TEN DAYS OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE LEAVE 

New South Wales public sector workers will be entitled to ten days of paid domestic violence leave per year. 

Nurses, teachers and police officers are among those who are entitled to the leave. 

Previously, public service employees who were victims of domestic violence were entitled to five days of leave per year.

Nurses, teachers and police officers are among those who are entitled to ten days of domestic violence paid leave

Nurses, teachers and police officers are among those who are entitled to ten days of domestic violence paid leave

‘NO JAB NO PLAY’ 

Western Australia are taking strict action on children who fail to have proper vaccinations with the introduction of a ‘No Jab No Play’ policy. 

The state’s health department will use data to chase families for vaccinations and will necessarily exclude children from childcare facilities and schools if a disease breaks out.

Parents will be slapped with potential fines of $1,000 if they permit a banned child to attend the facility. 

Western Australia are taking action on under-vaccinated children with the introduction of a 'No Jab No Play' policy

Western Australia are taking action on under-vaccinated children with the introduction of a ‘No Jab No Play’ policy

Childcare facilities will be required to collect and report on the immunisation status of all students.  

The state’s chief health officer may shut down facilities in the event of an outbreak of vaccine-preventable contagious disease. 

TAXPAYER-FUNDED ‘BABY BUNDLE’ FOR NEW MUMS 

 Mothers who have given birth and are discharged from hospital on January 1 will receive a taxpayer-funded ‘Baby Bundle’ valued at $300. 

The package includes a sleeping bag, play and change mats, baby wipes, thermometers and a first aid kit. 

A baby toothbrush, hand sanitiser, breast pads, board books and a face cloth are among other items included in the package. 

The packages will be delivered to the nominated New South Wales address free of charge.  

Mothers who have given birth and are discharged from hospital on January 1 will receive a taxpayer-funded 'Baby Bundle' valued at $300

Mothers who have given birth and are discharged from hospital on January 1 will receive a taxpayer-funded ‘Baby Bundle’ valued at $300

PRESCHOOL SUBSIDIES EXTENDED 

Three-year-old children will have access to two days a week of subsidised preschool education in New South Wales. 

The subsidies makes the NSW the first state to help families save $800 a year to help provide a start to early education.   

The subsidies makes the NSW the first state to help families save $800 a year to help provide a start to early education

The subsidies makes the NSW the first state to help families save $800 a year to help provide a start to early education

AFFORDABLE ELECTRICITY AND GAS 

Electricity prices will decrease for AGL customers in Victoria, with an average saving of $23 a year per household and $60 for small businesses. 

About 230,00 concession card holders in New South Wales, the ACT and Queensland on standing offers or non-discounted energy plans will receive an automatic 10% discount on electricity, for an average saving of $169. 

Electricity prices will decrease for AGL customers in Victoria with an average saving of $23 a year per household and $60 for small businesses

Electricity prices will decrease for AGL customers in Victoria with an average saving of $23 a year per household and $60 for small businesses

A decrease in gas prices for residential customers and small businesses for AGL customers in Victoria will see households save  $11 and $56 a year respectively.  

CREDIT CARD ISSUERS CRACK DOWN ON LATE DEBTS 

Australia’s ten biggest credit card issuers have agreed to clean up their act when it comes to dealing with customers in debt. 

In a bid to make trading fairer some credit card issuers will restrict the amount by which consumers can exceed their limit to ten per cent.

 They are also planning on allowing interest-free periods on new purchases.

Australian credit card issuers will crack down on nearly two million people who are struggling to pay credit card debt 

Australian credit card issuers will crack down on nearly two million people who are struggling to pay credit card debt 

Mandatory law reforms include a three-year responsible lending assessment, meaning banks cannot provide a credit card with a limit the consumer cannot repay within three years.   

ATM FEES REINTRODUCED 

National Australia Bank (NAB) customers will be forced to pay $2 when withdrawing money from over 3000 ATMs previously used for free since 2009. 

The new fee comes as NAB parts ways with the RediATM network, which are owned and operated by payments provider Cuscal.  

Last year, the big four banks announced they were ditching the ATM withdrawal fees, which costed consumers about $500 million a year. 

National Australia Bank (NAB) customers will be forced to pay $2 when withdrawing money from over 3000 ATMs previously used for free since 2009

National Australia Bank (NAB) customers will be forced to pay $2 when withdrawing money from over 3000 ATMs previously used for free since 2009

PARKING FINE RELIEF 

New South Wales motorists will be given a ten minute ‘grace period’ for parking fines after their ticket expires, given the printed ticket already paid was for one hour or more.     

DISABILITY SUPPORT IN PRISON 

Disability support pension recipients who wind up in prison will be able to receive the payment only once they’ve been released. 

Prisoners cannot receive the pension while behind bars but can suspend the payment off for two years. 

Disability support pension recipients in prison will be able to receive the payment once they've been released

Disability support pension recipients in prison will be able to receive the payment once they’ve been released

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


Comments are closed.