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What nutritionist Rebecca Gawthorne buys when craving a ‘salty’ snack

Exactly what a nutritionist buys from the supermarket when they’re craving a ‘salty’ snack – and they won’t break the bank like other ‘health’ foods

  • Nutritionist Rebecca Gawthorne shared a list of ‘healthy’ salty snacks 
  • In an Instagram video she picked up six supermarket products
  • She recommends pumpkin seeds, baby cucumbers, nuts and chickpeas 
  • All the items are affordable and healthy alternatives  

A leading Australian nutritionist has listed the healthy treats she buys from the supermarket when craving a salty snack.

Rebecca Gawthorne shared a ‘come shop with me’ video with her 150,000 Instagram followers and added six products to her basket – salted pumpkin seeds, baby cucumbers, salted chickpeas, ‘Seeded Snackers’ and salted nuts.

The Sydney nutritionist said salt plays a vital role in the body by regulating fluids and controlling blood pressure. 

Australian nutritionist Rebecca Gawthorne (pictured) shared what to buy if you’re craving a salty snack 

In a video posted on Instagram, she bought salted pumpkin seeds, baby cucumbers, salted chickpeas, 'Seeded Snackers' and salted nuts

The video outlines a healthier list of options for those wanting a nutritious salty snack

In a video posted on Instagram, she bought salted pumpkin seeds, baby cucumbers, salted chickpeas, ‘Seeded Snackers’ and salted nuts

‘Salt is essential for life and is necessary for many bodily functions. We need salt to help control our muscles and maintain our fluid balance,’ Rebecca wrote.

‘Salt is added to many highly processed, less nutritious foods, which we don’t want to be reaching for every time we are craving something salty.’

The video outlines a healthier list of options for those wanting a nutritious salty snack.

According to Healthline, chickpeas help with digestion and strengthen bones while pumpkin seeds are rich in vitamins and minerals, such as magnesium and vitamin K.

Cumbers are high in antioxidants, and peanuts are rich in protein, fat and fibre. 

But consuming too much salt is unhealthy for the body, but too little can lead to health issues. 

‘Craving salty foods from time to time is quite common, but if you find yourself always craving salt or it comes on very strong and suddenly, it could be a symptom of a more serious problem or underlying condition,’ Rebecca said. 

If your cravings persist, it’s best to speak to a GP or health professional.  

Cumbers are high in antioxidants, and peanuts are rich in protein, fat and fibre

Rebecca also picked up a packet of Seeded Snackers (pictured)

Cumbers are high in antioxidants, and peanuts are rich in protein, fat and fibre

Last year in another Instagram video Rebecca revealed why it’s essential to include fats in your diet to maintain optimum health.

She said fat is a ‘vital macronutrient’ that plays an important role in the body as it’s responsible for a number of roles – including protecting your organs, reducing inflammation and regulating hormones.

Fats help to absorb and transport ‘fat soluble vitamins’ around the body including vitamins A, D, E and K, which can be found in kale, spinach, parsley, broccoli and asparagus. 

Last year in another Instagram video Rebecca revealed why it's essential to include fats in your diet to maintain optimum health

She said fat is a 'vital macronutrient' that plays an important role in the body as it's responsible for a number of roles

Last year in another Instagram video Rebecca revealed why it’s essential to include fats in your diet to maintain optimum health 

Healthy fats also provide your body with essential fatty acids that are required to ‘build and maintain your cell membranes in our skin, hair, eyes, heart and brain’.

Fats can also help to insulate the body and keep you warm during cooler months. 

‘This is why I do NOT recommend low fat/no fat diets (unless medically needed),’ Rebecca wrote online.

According to Healthline, the top foods containing high amount of fat include avocado, cheese, dark chocolate, whole eggs, fatty fish, nuts and chia seeds. 



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