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Why you should never drive around without sunscreen: Scientist Hannah English shares video

Why you should NEVER drive around without sunscreen: Scientist shares ‘shocking’ photo of her sun damage after relying on the SPF in her makeup

  • An Aussie scientist is urging everyone to wear sunscreen while in the car 
  • Hannah English shared a shocking video of the sun damage on face
  • The right driver’s side had far more red sunspots compared to the left side 
  • The sun damage was exposed after she had a laser treatment 
  • ‘I relied on the SPF in my makeup for a number of years,’ Hannah said 

A scientist is urging all Australians to wear sunscreen and sunglasses while driving after sharing a shocking video of the sun damage on one side of her face.  

Hannah English is an avid applier of SPF50+ sunscreen, but admitted that for a number of years she ‘relied on the SPF in her makeup’ which led to sun damage. 

In the short video posted on Instagram, Hannah showed both sides of her face after having a laser treatment – and the right driver’s window side had far more red sunspots than the left.

 

Australian scientist Hannah English (pictured) shared a shocking video of the sun damage on her face after having a laser facial 

The left side of her face had a few spots on her jawline and under the eye,

Whereas the right side (the driver's side) had spots all over her cheek, jawline and under the eye.

The left side of her face (pictured, left) had a few spots on her jawline and under the eye, whereas the right side – the driver’s side – (right) had spots all over her cheek, jawline and under the eye.

‘So all the spots have gone a little bit darker before they come off in a couple of days,’ Hannah said, explaining the reason why the spots were red after the laser treatment. 

The left side of her face had a few spots on her jawline and under the eye, whereas the right side (the driver’s side) had spots all over her cheek, jawline and under the eye. 

‘There’s so much more. Please wear sunscreen and sunglasses while you’re in the car!’ she said. 

Hannah said you can’t rely on makeup with SPF included to shield you, because of how much you would have to apply. 

According to the Cancer Council, sunscreen should be reapplied every two hours or after swimming, sweating or towel drying. 

It should also be applied 20 minutes before being exposed to UV sunlight. 

Top tips for using sun cream:

* Put it on clean, dry skin 15 to 30 minutes before you go out in the sun to allow it time to interact with your skin. Re-apply it just before you go out – you’ll increase the amount applied and be more likely to get the stated SPF benefit.

* Cover all parts of the body not protected by clothing (don’t forget your ears, the back of your neck, the backs of your hands and the tops of your feet).

* Apply it evenly, and don’t rub it in excessively – most sunscreens will absorb into the outer layer of skin and don’t need to be rubbed in vigorously.

* Re-apply at least once every two hours and after swimming or exercise.

* Think beyond the beach and pool – use sunscreen whenever you go outdoors for a significant amount of time, such as to the park, a lunchtime walk to the shops, playing sports or gardening.

* Store your sunscreen at a temperature of less than 30 degrees Celsius. If you leave it in the glovebox of your car or in the sun, it may lose its effectiveness. Keep it in the esky with the drinks, in the shade or wrapped in a towel.

* Don’t use sunscreens that have passed their expiry date as they may have lost their effectiveness.

Source: Choice

Within five hours the video was watched more than 32,000 times and many were in disbelief. 

‘Omg I don’t even wanna think about my sun mistakes,’ one person wrote, another added: ‘Wowee, I need me a new pair of sunglasses.’ 

Other skincare experts also wished they started wearing sunscreen earlier on in life and thanked Hannah for sharing the information. 

‘I was convincing a 24-year-old at work to wear sunscreen this week, and I was telling her I wish I’d started before I did (25, I’m now 32) because old damage shows up as you age. I should show her this!’ one woman wrote. 

‘So satisfying to knock back that sun damage. Thanks for sharing your journey and using it to illustrate an important point about sun protection! Looks like you’re going to get a great result,’ another said.



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