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William and Harry agree to split Diana memorial fund

Prince William and Prince Harry have agreed to divide the future proceeds of their mother’s memorial fund between their charities as they finalise details of their separate working lives, it has today been revealed.

An agreement between the Royal Foundation of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and the now abandoned Sussex Royal Foundation was signed in December last year, financial documents show.

It was agreed just under a month before the Duke and Duchess of Sussex announced they intended to step back as senior members of the royal family and become financially independent.

In April 2013, the Royal Foundation charity assumed legal control of The Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund to safeguard any future income upon the ending of its operations.

Prince William and Prince Harry have agreed to divide the future proceeds of their mother’s memorial fund between their charities as they finalise details of their separate working lives

The Duke and Duchess of Sussex pictured in Galway, Ireland, in May

Prince Harry, Duke of Sussex and Meghan, Duchess of Sussex attend the Commonwealth Day Service in March

An agreement between the Royal Foundation of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge (pictured left) and the now abandoned Sussex Royal Foundation of the Duke and Duchess of Sussex (pictured right) was signed in December last year, financial documents show.

The fund is no longer actively fundraising, but it is understood to occasionally receive some legacies and donations, with the bulk of its money originally going to charities chosen by William and Harry.

The Royal Foundation had operated under the names of the Sussexes and Cambridges, but in June last year Harry and Meghan revealed they were to formally split from their joint charity.

In 2019 The Royal Foundation received £21,346 from The Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund – close to the £21,583 received in 2018. Pictured: A young Prince Harry and Prince William with the Prince and Princess of Wales in 1987

In 2019 The Royal Foundation received £21,346 from The Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund – close to the £21,583 received in 2018. Pictured: A young Prince Harry and Prince William with the Prince and Princess of Wales in 1987

It was renamed the Royal Foundation of the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, while the separate, but now defunct, Sussex Royal Foundation was established.

The Royal Foundation’s report and consolidated financial statements for the year ending December 31 2019 said: ‘On 18 December 2019, an agreement was signed with the Sussex Royal Foundation by which The Royal Foundation intended to grant half of the net future proceeds received by the Diana Fund to Sussex Royal.

‘In March 2020 The Duke and Duchess of Sussex announced that they would no longer be operating Sussex Royal as their primary philanthropic vehicle in the UK and accordingly their share of the net income will instead be donated to another charity of The Duke of Sussex’s choosing.’

According to the document, in 2019 The Royal Foundation received £21,346 from The Diana, Princess of Wales Memorial Fund – close to the £21,583 received in 2018.

It is understood Harry has asked for his share of the funds to go to Sentebale, a charity he founded to help the victims of extreme poverty and HIV/Aids in Lesotho, Botswana and Malawi.

The Royal Foundation annual report revealed that an unrestricted grant of £145,000 was awarded to Sussex Royal to facilitate its set-up.

Meanwhile, a restricted grant of £100,000 was also awarded to Sussex Royal for the development of Harry’s sustainable tourism programme Travalyst.

As part of their decision to ‘leave the charity’, The Royal Foundation said it had also agreed to provide ‘a home for legacy projects set up by the Duke and Duchess of Sussex’.

This includes the Empowering Communities and Full Effect programmes, which combat youth violence in London and Nottingham and provide grant funding to a community kitchen in West London.

Prince Harry and Meghan Duchess of Sussex and Prince William and Catherine Duchess of Cambridge in 2018

Prince Harry and Meghan Duchess of Sussex and Prince William and Catherine Duchess of Cambridge in 2018

The Duke of Sussex, 35, and wife Meghan Markle, 38, who are now living in Los Angeles after quitting as senior working royals in March pictured on  a video call with young leaders from the Queen's Commonwealth Trust last week

The Duke of Sussex, 35, and wife Meghan Markle, 38, who are now living in Los Angeles after quitting as senior working royals in March pictured on  a video call with young leaders from the Queen’s Commonwealth Trust last week 

The Endeavour Fund was transferred to the Invictus Games Foundation, while the Coach Core programme has become a new charity.

Earlier this month, it was reported that the Duke and Duchess of Sussex were formally winding up their UK foundation as they press ahead with their global charitable body named after their son Archie.

The couple, who are now living in Los Angeles after quitting as senior working royals in March, have been establishing the new charitable organisation, Archewell, over the past months.

The Royal Foundation said it remains the primary philanthropic vehicle for the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge.

Prince Charles plans to ‘dampen a sense of entitlement’ to housing and other perks among minor members of The Firm as he prepares to become king, royal author claims 

By Chloe Morgan For Mailonline 

Prince Charles plans to ‘dampen a sense of entitlement among royals’ when he becomes king, a royal author has claimed.

Nigel Cawthorne, author of ‘Prince Andrew: Epstein and the Palace,’ has said that the Prince of Wales, 71, hopes to modernise the institution of monarchy so that it’s more apt for the 21st century. 

Speaking to The Express, he said: ‘The idea of the monarchy he sees, and in which he seems to be supported by William and, increasingly, it would appear the Queen, is one that suits the 21st century.

‘Like the Windsors’ relatives who reign in the Netherlands, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Belgium and Spain, he prefers to dampen a sense of entitlement among royals.’ 

Royal author Nigel Cawthorne has claimed that Prince Charles, 71, plans to 'dampen a sense of entitlement among royals' when he becomes king. Pictured, the royal smiles as he meets key workers from Transport for London, who have worked throughout the COVID-19 outbreak on July 2

Royal author Nigel Cawthorne has claimed that Prince Charles, 71, plans to ‘dampen a sense of entitlement among royals’ when he becomes king. Pictured, the royal smiles as he meets key workers from Transport for London, who have worked throughout the COVID-19 outbreak on July 2

The Queen is joined by members of the royal family on the balcony of Buckingham Place watch the flypast after the Trooping the Colour ceremony, as she celebrated her official birthday on 8 July 2019

The Queen is joined by members of the royal family on the balcony of Buckingham Place watch the flypast after the Trooping the Colour ceremony, as she celebrated her official birthday on 8 July 2019

‘Being born as a Windsor is a privilege, but it doesn’t mean that being a certain number in line to throne means an entitlement to housing and other perks of The Firm. 

He went on to say that stripping back the royals may also be beneficial to those who aren’t keen to live a life in the public eye.

‘Prince Charles and Prince William have no choice in the matter, and nor will Prince George in due course,’ he pointed out.

But he added that for some, being a royal is both a ‘gift and personal choice.’    

The Prince of Wales (bottom left) pictured alongside Camilla, Kate Middleton, Prince William, Meghan Markle and Prince Harry at Westminster Abbey, London, on 9 March 2020

The Prince of Wales (bottom left) pictured alongside Camilla, Kate Middleton, Prince William, Meghan Markle and Prince Harry at Westminster Abbey, London, on 9 March 2020

The heir to the throne has long been reported to want to slim down the royal family, but Andrew’s scandal is believed to have accelerated his plans, The Daily Star has previously reported.

At the time, the Prince of Wales met his father Prince Philip at Sandringham where the pair are believed to have discussed the Queen’s ‘retirement’ in the next 18 months.

Charles could take on a Prince Regent role, which would see him taking over family affairs and the handling of day-to-day business from his mother, 93.

Brittani Barger, deputy editor of Royal Central, added to The Sun: ‘I think the Andrew crisis has definitely strengthened Prince Charles’s desire for a slimmed-down monarchy.

‘Prince Andrew is now out of the picture. I don’t see him ever undertaking royal duties again, and any hope that his daughters would is now gone.

‘I think when it’s all said and done, the monarchy will be Charles and his children and grandchildren.’



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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