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Woman bitten by shark in the Bahamas says she was looking for them and plans to go back soon

Doctors have saved the fingers of a woman who was bitten by a blacktip shark while spearfishing in the Bahamas.

Maggie Ewing, 34, from Boston, Massachusetts had just speared a hogfish near Treasure Key Beach when the sea creature attacked her from behind.

‘When I arrived there, she was lying on the floor with her hand elevated and trying to control the bleeding,’ Chief Colin Albury of Abaco Crash and Fire Rescue told ABC News.

Ewing was airlifted to Florida for critical surgery, where despite suffering significant damage to her index and middle fingers on her left hand, doctors were able to save them. 

After coming out of recovery, Ewing said she plants to go back soon.

 

Maggie Ewing, 34 (center), from Boston, Massachusetts is recovering after a blacktip shark shredded her middle and index fingers on her left hand while she was spearfishing in the Bahamas over the weekend

Ewing was actually looking for sharks when she speared a hogfish instead, WPLG 10 reported.

As she ascended back to the surface toward a private boat, that’s when the blacktip shark came at her from the side to which her back was turned and shredded her fingers. 

Thankfully, doctors  at Regional Memorial Hospital were able to tend to her quickly, after Ewing was first brought by Trinity Air Ambulance International to Fort Lauderdale, and then taken to the medical facility in Hollywood.

As Ewing ascended to the surface toward a private boat, that's when the blacktip shark came at her from the side to which her back was turned and shredded her fingers on her left hand

As Ewing ascended to the surface toward a private boat, that’s when the blacktip shark came at her from the side to which her back was turned and shredded her fingers on her left hand

While they remain optimistic about her recovery, it’s not clear how her range of motion in her fingers and hand will ultimately be affected. 

Albury called the incident an ‘unfortunate accident,’ noting that Ewing is an experienced hunter and diver.

‘It’s just one of those things and it happened,’ Albury said.

‘It can happen at any time. We must learn to respect the sea when we’re in there.’

Ewing’s family has a second home in the Bahamas, where she said she plans to return to soon.

Chief Colin Albury of Abaco Crash and Fire Rescue called the incident an 'unfortunate accident,' noting that Ewing is an experienced hunter and diver.

Chief Colin Albury of Abaco Crash and Fire Rescue called the incident an ‘unfortunate accident,’ noting that Ewing is an experienced hunter and diver.

 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk