Woman had no pain relief to give birth to dead infant and searched through bucket for ‘baby bits’

Grieving mother who was forced to give birth to a dead foetus without pain relief reveals how she passed out before having to search through a bucket for ‘baby bits’ after nurse threw them out

  • Woman was given no pain relief and was forced to give birth to her dead baby 
  • Gemma Carey was admitted to Moruya District Hospital on NSW far south coast
  • She was induced and forced to give birth to the dead baby with no pain relief
  • The 34-year-old passed out due to pain but was only offered panadeine forte  
  • She was forced to go through a bin to find dead baby bits as it was thrown out 

A grieving mother was forced to give birth with no pain relief before searching through a bucket for ‘baby bits’ after a nurse allegedly threw them out. 

Gemma Carey was admitted to Moruya District Hospital on the NSW far south coast, last weekend.

The 35-year-old, who is an Associate Professor of public health at the University of NSW, said her baby had died in the womb at eight weeks.

She she already knew from a scan that her eight-week old baby had no heartbeat but had to give birth to the body after being induced. 

Prof Carey said she was offered no pain relief and ‘passed out’ from the pain.

She said she wanted to DNA testing foetus because it was her second miscarriage but was forced to go through a bucket for baby bits after a nurse threw out the remains. 

Gemma Carey (pictured) was admitted to Moruya District Hospital on the NSW far south coast, where she was forced to give birth to her dead baby.

‘This weekend I was induced and gave birth to my dead baby with no proper pain relief,’ she posted to Twitter on October 13.

‘I had to sort through a bucket of my miscarriage with a doctor to look for baby bits (nurse threw them out), and was taken to surgery to get more baby bits for DNA testing.’

‘Australia: your healthcare system.’

Prof Carey then added that the on-call doctor would not see her or prescribe pain relief, even after she had passed out due to the pain.

Talking to the Daily Telegraph, she said the midwives at the hospital were treating her well but there was only one doctor due to staff cuts, and he was preoccupied in the emergency department.

During labour, Prof Carey passed out due to the excruciating pain, but they still only provided her with panadeine forte.

'This weekend I was induced and gave birth to my dead baby with no proper pain relief,' she posted to Twitter on October 13

‘This weekend I was induced and gave birth to my dead baby with no proper pain relief,’ she posted to Twitter on October 13

Prof Carey (left) then added that the on-call doctor would not see her or prescribe pain relief, even after she had passed out due to the pain

Prof Carey (left) then added that the on-call doctor would not see her or prescribe pain relief, even after she had passed out due to the pain

When she was induced to go into labour, she said there was no explanation that there would be no pain relief during the birth.

‘I didn’t understand I was consenting to no pain relief and they didn’t explain to me they were putting me into labour,’ she said. 

Miscommunication during the nurse handover had also meant that her lost baby was ‘accidentally thrown out’. 

Prof Carey said she wanted to keep everything to undergo genetic testing as it was her second miscarriage.

Because of this, the young woman then had to undergo a surgical procedure to remove the foetus to get remaining DNA from the lost baby.

During labour, Prof Carey passed out due to the excruciating pain, but they still only provided her with panadeine forte

During labour, Prof Carey passed out due to the excruciating pain, but they still only provided her with panadeine forte

While the experience was traumatising, Prof Carey said it was not nearly as bad as when she attended Canberra Hospital for a miscarriage treatment this year.

The 35-year-old rushed to the Emergency Room in May where she found that her baby had died at just 12 weeks.

Doctors told her to take drugs to induce labour and then told her to go home and give the birth at home.

‘It was my private obstetrician from Sydney who called Canberra Hospital and said this is not how you do things and informed them to do a curette. And I refused to leave the hospital until they operated,’ she said.

‘It was poor medical practice and women are being sent home to go into labour at 12 weeks.’ 

Daily Mail Australia has reached out to the Southern NSW Local Health District for comment. 

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