Woman reveals horrifying injury from red back spider bite and issues a VERY stark warning to Aussies

Woman reveals her horrifying injury from red back spider bite – as she issues a VERY stark warning to other Aussies

  • Morna Flower was bitten on the finger by a red back in the Northern Territory
  • She posted pictures of her red, swollen hand and bite wounds on Facebook 
  • Ms Flower’s post gives as a warning to other gardeners to always wear gloves
  • Red back spiders are among the most dangerous in Australia, with toxic venom

A woman has issued a dire warning after copping a terrible injury from a red back spider bite.

Morna Flower was bitten on the finger by the deadly arachnid while gardening in mid June in Santa Teresa in the Northern Territory.

She posted a picture of a red swollen welt on the middle finger on her right hand on the Gardening Australia Facebook page, with an urgent warning for other gardeners.

‘Why you need to wear gloves in the garden,’ Ms Flower posted.

Morna Flower was bitten on the finger by a red back spider in the Northern Territory

Ms Flower posted pictures of her red, swollen hand and bite wounds on her right middle finger on the Gardening Australia Facebook page

Ms Flower posted pictures of her red, swollen hand and bite wounds on her right middle finger on the Gardening Australia Facebook page

‘Just out of surgery but so far still have my finger.’

Red back spiders are among the most dangerous in Australia, with the toxic venom from their bites effecting the nervous system.

A male red back spiders fangs are not capable of penetrating human skin, though a bite from a female red back spider can kill a person. 

Comments on Ms Flower’s post were shocked at the horrific wound on her finger.

‘Oh my gosh that looks so sore and nasty,’ one comment reads.

‘Hope you’re ok! Get well soon!’ another post says.

‘God that looks so painful I would have packed myself off to the doctors,’ another comment reads.

Symptoms from a red back spider bite include swelling, intense pain around the bite area and sweating around five minutes after being bitten.

The whole body is susceptible to pain and sweating after half an hour, with vomiting, nausea and headaches common after an hour.

The spiders are found all over Australia in dry, warm, sheltered areas, though they rarely leave their webs making humans unlikely to be bitten unless they come into direct contact with their web.

Anti-venom can be used to treat a red back spider bite along with ice packs over the bite areas to reduce pain and swelling.

Ms Flower captioned the images of her wounds with 'why you need to wear gloves in the garden'

Ms Flower captioned the images of her wounds with ‘why you need to wear gloves in the garden’

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk