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Woman who beat anorexia with the help of rock climbing dies in fall at Wisconsin state park

Savannah Buik, 22, died on Wednesday in the state park in Saulk County, Wisconsin

A young woman who credited rock climbing for helping her overcome anorexia has died in a fatal fall at Devil’s Lake State Park in Wisconsin.

Georgia native Savannah Buik, 22, died on Wednesday in the state park in Saulk County, Wisconsin while climbing the East Bluff with the aid of ropes, according to the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources.

Savannah wrote passionately about her struggles with eating disorder and the central role rock climbing played in her recovery on social media and a personal website. 

‘Twenty-one years of being alive were made possible because I wanted it, and because others helped make it possible,’ she wrote in February of 2017.

‘Furthermore, climbing is such an integral part of my life and my recovery, and I owe a good amount of my persistence to continue to stay healthy to the climbing lifestyle I’ve chosen and everything stemming from it,’ she continued. 

Savannah wrote passionately about her struggles with eating disorder and the central role rock climbing played in her recovery 

Savannah wrote passionately about her struggles with eating disorder and the central role rock climbing played in her recovery 

She had just completed coursework for a bachelor's degree in mathematical sciences from DePaul University in Chicago

She had just completed coursework for a bachelor’s degree in mathematical sciences from DePaul University in Chicago

She was climbing with the assistance of ropes on the East Bluff at Devil's Lake State Park (pictured) when she fell and was fatally injured

She was climbing with the assistance of ropes on the East Bluff at Devil’s Lake State Park (pictured) when she fell and was fatally injured

The Baraboo Fire Department’s Rope Rescue Team assisted the DNR in the emergency response to Savannah’s fall. 

The DNR is conducting an investigation into the fatal incident.

Buik had just completed coursework for a bachelor’s degree in mathematical sciences from DePaul University in Chicago, her family told the Chicago Tribune. 

‘It turned her life around,’ Savannah’s mother, Nina Buik, told the paper of her rock climbing. ‘She embraced it. It is a sport where you can (focus) your mind, your body, your spirit and it really helped her transition.’ 

Savannah had been an avid soccer player until suffering three concussions and being advised to quit the sport by a neurologist.

Without the sport, she spiraled into eating disorders and depression and spent her 14th birthday in a hospital with a dangerously low heart rate and blood pressure, she has written.

After Savannah's brother introduced her to rock climbing, it became a passion, and she traveled the country exploring the nation's parks

After Savannah’s brother introduced her to rock climbing, it became a passion, and she traveled the country exploring the nation’s parks

'Climbing is such an integral part of my life and my recovery,' she once wrote

'Climbing is such an integral part of my life and my recovery,' she once wrote

‘Climbing is such an integral part of my life and my recovery,’ she once wrote

After her brother introduced her to rock climbing, it became a passion, and she traveled the country exploring the nation’s parks.

She enrolled in DePaul and also found her studies there to be a driving passion.

‘My studies in school and my desire to learn something new drives me to wake up and chase the unknown,’ Savannah wrote in the post last year.

‘The unknown is scary, and although the path of my recovery isn’t clear, I do know one thing: I am more powerful than my eating disorder, and I will live to see many years of a life that is ABSOLUTELY worth living.

‘To my family and friends that have made the path of recovery possible, thank you.’



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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