News, Culture & Society

Wombat has to be forcibly removed after terrorising a community by invading homes through cat flaps 

Rogue wombat named ‘Mr Bat’ has to be forcibly removed after terrorising a community by invading their homes through cat flaps

  • A rogue wombat dubbed ‘Mr Bat’ has been forcibly removed from Longford, TAS 
  • Mr Bat terrorised a community for 12 months invading homes through cat flaps
  • The looter would steal food, make beds from cushions, and dig holes in yards
  • Authorities captured the animal on Monday and took him to Cradle Mountain 

A rogue wombat dubbed ‘Mr Bat’ has been forcibly removed after terrorising a community for 12 months in a series of home invasions via cat flaps. 

The furry animal’s rampage through Longford, in Tasmania’s northern midlands, ended on Monday when authorities managed to catch him.

For a year, Mr Bat has entered homes and ransacked them. Raiding fridges, making beds out of cushions and tunnelling under fences. 

Wombat ‘Mr Bat’ (pictured) was detained on Monday in Longford and  relocated to Cradle Mountain

Tasmania Parks and Wildlife Service captured the intruder, who had been hiding out in council pipes during the day and rampaging at night, by setting up a trap in a Burley Street yard.

Mr Bat was relocated to Cradle Mountain National Park, 134km west, where a dense population of wild wombats reside.

Northern Midlands Councillor Matthew Brooks who has caught Mr Bat snacking on his lawn said his first run-in with the wombat happened three months ago. 

‘I noticed square droppings on the path first and said to my wife I think we have a wombat and she said don’t be ridiculous,’ he said.

Councillor Brooks said catching Mr Bat (pictured) was harder than authorities imagined and it took a week to lure him into a trap

Councillor Brooks said catching Mr Bat (pictured) was harder than authorities imagined and it took a week to lure him into a trap

Councillor Brooks said although Mr Bat had behaved like a pest, residents were mainly concerned about his welfare.  

He had also broken into elderly residents’ homes which could be hazardous. 

‘Our major concern was getting him before he was run over,’ he told Daily Mail Australia. 

‘If he had gotten into an elderly person’s home, and they got up in the dark to check, he could have potentially knocked them over.’

Despite his behaviour, Councillor Brooks said the wombat was not aggressive at all and the four-legged thief was ‘quite a cute sight’.

‘They [residents] would hear something rustling downstairs at 3am in the morning and get up to go see what it was, and find a wombat greeting them in the passage,’ he said.

‘It’s been quite a comical few months trying to get pictures and find out who had him in their home last night, eating their lettuce and vegetables.’

Because the marsupial was not afraid of humans, Councillor Brooks said he was probably hand-raised. 

‘I reckon someone had raised him up and he’s gotten too destructive and they have released him.’  

CCTV footage shows the marauder dashing into a resident's home earlier this month

CCTV footage shows the marauder dashing into a resident’s home earlier this month

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk