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Women take to the streets across the US to protest Texas abortion law

Thousands of women across the country took part in a series of 660 marches to protest against the state’s most restrictive abortion law.

A crowd of more than 1,000 protesters gathered at the Texas Capitol, in Austin, as people chanted ‘Abort Abbott,’ in referenced to Texas Gov. Greg Abbot who signed into law a measure that bans abortions after six weeks in August.  

In New York, those marching included some celebrities. A pregnant Jennifer Lawrence who is shortly expecting her first child posed with her baby bump together with Amy Schumer.

‘I don’t have a uterus and she is pregnant but we out here @womensmarch @plannedparenthood #rallyforabortionjustice’ wrote Schumer on Instagram.

Schumer recently underwent a hysterectomy and appendix as a result of endometriosis.  

The Big Apple protests were replicated in other cities across the nation with the Texas state capital, Austin, being a focal point.

Demonstrations were also held in Philadelphia, Los Angeles, Columbus, Houston, Topeka and Washington D.C. in solidarity of women’s reproductive rights.  

The demonstrations come days before the start of a new term for the Supreme Court that will decide the future of abortion rights in the United States, after appointments of justices by President Donald Trump strengthened conservative control of the high court. 

Amy Schumer and Jennifer Lawrence attended the Rally for Abortion Justice event in New York City on Saturday

Taking a stand: Patricia and Rosanna Arquette were also spotted attending the Women's March Action: March 4 Reproductive Rights event in Downtown Los Angeles

Taking a stand: Patricia and Rosanna Arquette were also spotted attending the Women’s March Action: March 4 Reproductive Rights event in Downtown Los Angeles

Better together: The sisters were also spotted posing for a quick snap with actress Harlow Jane at the pro-choice event

Better together: The sisters were also spotted posing for a quick snap with actress Harlow Jane at the pro-choice event

Making it clear: Debbie Allen was spotted spending time with Gloria Allred, who wore a cap with the phrase 'Protect Roe V. Wade on its front'

Making it clear: Debbie Allen was spotted spending time with Gloria Allred, who wore a cap with the phrase ‘Protect Roe V. Wade on its front’

Lawrence, 31, stood at Schumer’s side while holding onto a handwritten poster with a pro-choice slogan in an Instagram post from the comedian, 40.

The Trainwreck star, who underwent a hysterectomy earlier this year, captioned the post saying: ‘I don’t have a uterus and she is pregnant but we out here @womensmarch @plannedparenthood #rallyforabortionjustice.’ 

Schumer, who is the cousin and Senate Majority leader Chuck Schumer held a sign that read: ‘Abortion is essential.’ 

Lawrence also showed her support for a women’s right to choose.

The Hunger Games star held a hand-scrawled sign that read ‘Women can’t be free if they don’t control their bodies.’ 

Patricia and Rosanna Arquette were also seen attending the Women’s March Action: March 4 Reproductive Rights event at Pershing Square in Downtown Los Angeles. 

Also in LA, Women’s rights attorney Gloria Allred notably wore a hat that bore the phrase ‘Protect Roe V. Wade’ on the front. 

Hundreds gathered in Austin, Texas, to kick off the 660 marches scheduled on Saturday in a nationwide protest of the Texan six-week abortion ban that was passed into law in August

Hundreds gathered in Austin, Texas, to kick off the 660 marches scheduled on Saturday in a nationwide protest of the Texan six-week abortion ban that was passed into law in August

Protestors in Los Angeles marched down the streets in solidarity of the women in Texas on October 2

Protestors in Los Angeles marched down the streets in solidarity of the women in Texas on October 2

Women's rights advocates marched with the Women's March banner in Los Angeles

Women’s rights advocates marched with the Women’s March banner in Los Angeles

Protestors in Topkea, Kansas, also joined in to show their support for women's reproductive rights

Protestors in Topkea, Kansas, also joined in to show their support for women’s reproductive rights

Protestors also gathered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to march in support of abortion rights in the US

Protestors also gathered in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to march in support of abortion rights in the US 

Protestors in Washington D.C marched along the capitol as they made their way to the Supreme Court as the high court prepares for a new term that could decide the future of abortion rights in the country

Protestors in Washington D.C marched along the capitol as they made their way to the Supreme Court as the high court prepares for a new term that could decide the future of abortion rights in the country

New Yorkers also joined in the nationwide protests as they marched in the streets of Manhattan

New Yorkers also joined in the nationwide protests as they marched in the streets of Manhattan

Many of the protestors in New York held up signs with images of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Many of the protestors in New York held up signs with images of the late Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot joined in on the protest in Chicago's Daley Plaza

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot joined in on the protest in Chicago’s Daley Plaza

A pregnant woman joined the protestors in Houston to stand in solidarity for women who choose to get an abortion

A pregnant woman joined the protestors in Houston to stand in solidarity for women who choose to get an abortion

The marches are part of ‘a fight to secure, safeguard, and strengthen our constitutional right to an abortion,’ Rachel O’Leary Carmona, executive director of the Women’s March, said in a statement. 

‘And it’s a fight against the Supreme Court justices, state lawmakers, and senators who aren´t on our side – or aren’t acting with the urgency this moment demands.’ 

The first Women’s March of the Biden administration headed straight for the steps of the Supreme Court. 

Many thousands of women filled a square near the White House for a rally before the march. 

They waved signs that said ‘Mind your own uterus,’ ‘I love someone who had an abortion’ and ‘Abortion is a personal choice, not a legal debate,’ among other messages. 

Some wore T-shirts reading simply ‘1973,’ a reference to the landmark Roe v. Wade decision, which made abortion legal for generations of American women.

Protestors across the nation held up signs and yelled chants in support of women's rights. One person wrote over their own sign to read that they were someone who had an abortion

Protestors across the nation held up signs and yelled chants in support of women’s rights. One person wrote over their own sign to read that they were someone who had an abortion 

Protestors in Philadelphia stood against the Texas law. One male protestor held a sign that read, 'Her Body, Her Choice!'

Protestors in Philadelphia stood against the Texas law. One male protestor held a sign that read, ‘Her Body, Her Choice!’

Many of the protestors in Washington D.C. had signs alluding to the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a women's rights champion

Many of the protestors in Washington D.C. had signs alluding to the late Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a women’s rights champion

Each protest varied in size. A smaller amount of protesters gathered in Columbus, Ohio, to show their support

Each protest varied in size. A smaller amount of protesters gathered in Columbus, Ohio, to show their support 

One protestor wore a bloodied outfit of Lady Justice with a woman's reproductive organ crucified on a cross

One protestor wore a bloodied outfit of Lady Justice with a woman’s reproductive organ crucified on a cross 

Another person dressed up as a character from the The Handmaid's Tale to protest restrictions' on women's rights

Another person dressed up as a character from the The Handmaid’s Tale to protest restrictions’ on women’s rights

Another protestor dressed as a handmaid joined protestors outside the Georgia State Capitol in Atlanta

Another protestor dressed as a handmaid joined protestors outside the Georgia State Capitol in Atlanta

Maria Shriver, president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of Greater Texas, left, attended the Los Angeles march as the organization's leadership stood against the Texas law

Maria Shriver, president and CEO of Planned Parenthood of Greater Texas, left, attended the Los Angeles march as the organization’s leadership stood against the Texas law 

Protesters chanted and yelled into microphones as they stood by the Texas capitol building in Austin

Protesters chanted and yelled into microphones as they stood by the Texas capitol building in Austin

Women gathered in Atlanta, Georgia, with signs that communicated a women's right to choice

Women gathered in Atlanta, Georgia, with signs that communicated a women’s right to choice

Elaine Baijal, a 19-year-old student at American University, took cellphone photos with her friends and their signs as the event started. She said her mother told her of coming to a march for legal abortion with her own mother in the 1970s.

‘It’s sad that we still have to fight for our right 40 years later. But it´s a tradition I want to continue,’ Baijal said of the march. 

The march comes a day after the Biden administration urged a federal judge to block the nation´s most restrictive abortion law, which has banned most abortions in Texas since early September. It’s one of a series of cases that will give the nation’s divided high court occasion to uphold or overrule Roe v. Wade.

The Texas law was a focus of the speakers.

‘We´re going to keep giving it to Texas,’ Marsha Jones of the Afiya Center for Black women’s health care in Dallas, pledged to the Washington crowd. ‘You can no longer tell us what to do with our bodies!’

Alexis McGill Johnson, the president of Planned Parenthood nationally, told of women forced to drive many hours across state lines – sometimes multiple state lines – to end pregnancies in the weeks since the Texas law went into effect.

Along with the protest in Austin, Texans gathered in Houston to speak out against the law

Along with the protest in Austin, Texans gathered in Houston to speak out against the law

Protestors in Kansas marched to the Statehouse in Topeka to voice their opposition

Protestors in Kansas marched to the Statehouse in Topeka to voice their opposition

One protestor in Ohio lifted a sign that simply read 'Trust Women' at the state's capitol building

One protestor in Ohio lifted a sign that simply read ‘Trust Women’ at the state’s capitol building 

People gathered at the Ohio Statehouse, in Columbus, to advocate for women's abortion rights

People gathered at the Ohio Statehouse, in Columbus, to advocate for women’s abortion rights

New York City protestors marched with signs asking for abortion rights and the defense of Roe v. Wade

New York City protestors marched with signs asking for abortion rights and the defense of Roe v. Wade 

Hundreds of protestors in Washington D.C. marched down Pennsylvania Avenue

Hundreds of protestors in Washington D.C. marched down Pennsylvania Avenue

Protestors stood outside the US Supreme Court as Capitol officers looked on

Protestors stood outside the US Supreme Court as Capitol officers looked on

Protestors outside the Supreme Court building stood apart from the capitol officers who were dressed in their riot gear

Protestors outside the Supreme Court building stood apart from the capitol officers who were dressed in their riot gear

People held up signs that read, 'Women's Rights Are Human Rights' and 'Do Better,' in reference to the Texan law

People held up signs that read, ‘Women’s Rights Are Human Rights’ and ‘Do Better,’ in reference to the Texan law

A pro-abortion rights advocate in Austin called for an end to the six-week abortion ban in Texas

A pro-abortion rights advocate in Austin called for an end to the six-week abortion ban in Texas

‘The moment is dark… but that is why we are here,’ Johnson told the crowd packed into Freedom Square and surrounding streets. With the upcoming Supreme Court term, ‘No matter where you are, this fight is at your doorstep right now.’

Speaking at an unrelated event in Maine, Republican Sen. Susan Collins called the Texas law ‘extreme, inhumane and unconstitutional’ and said she´s working to make Roe v. Wade the ‘law of the land.’

She said she´s working with two Democrats and another Republican, and they´re ‘vetting’ the language of their bill. Collins declined to identify her colleagues, but said the legislation will be introduced soon.

An opponent of women’s access to abortion called this year’s march theme ‘macabre.’

‘What about equal rights for unborn women?’ tweeted Jeanne Mancini, president of an anti-abortion group called March for Life.

The Washington D.C. protestors flooded Pennsylvania Avenue and adjacent streets on Saturday

The Washington D.C. protestors flooded Pennsylvania Avenue and adjacent streets on Saturday

Those in Los Angeles celebrated the nationwide March as hundreds gathered in the city

Those in Los Angeles celebrated the nationwide March as hundreds gathered in the city

One of the more popular messages of the event was 'Ruth Sent Us' in reference to the late women's rights advocate

One of the more popular messages of the event was ‘Ruth Sent Us’ in reference to the late women’s rights advocate

Residents in Sioux City, Iowa, joined in on the nationwide protests. A women's rights advocate held a sign to block out a pro-life counter-protestor at the city's protest site

Residents in Sioux City, Iowa, joined in on the nationwide protests. A women’s rights advocate held a sign to block out a pro-life counter-protestor at the city’s protest site

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot spoke with residents in support of Planned Parenthood and abortion rights

Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot spoke with residents in support of Planned Parenthood and abortion rights

'Trust women' was another popular phrase throughout the protests. One woman held such a sign in Chicago

‘Trust women’ was another popular phrase throughout the protests. One woman held such a sign in Chicago

Porchse Queen Miller, left, led a group of protestors in Atlanta, Georgia, on the way to the statehouse

Porchse Queen Miller, left, led a group of protestors in Atlanta, Georgia, on the way to the statehouse

The Women’s March has become a regular event – although interrupted by the coronavirus pandemic – since millions of women turned out in the United States and around the world the day after the January 2017 inauguration of Trump. 

Trump endorsed punishing women for getting abortions and made appointment of conservative judges a mission of his presidency.

Without Trump as a central figure for women of varied political beliefs to rally against, and with the pandemic still going strong, organizers talk of hundreds of thousands of participants nationally Saturday, not the millions of 2017.

Latina comedian and activist Cristela Alonzo hosted Saturday’s rally in Washington, which featured speeches from many advocates and providers of abortion access. Actress Busy Philipps and swimmer Schuyler Bailar were to take part.

Security in the capital was much lighter than for a political rally a few weeks ago in support of Trump supporters jailed in the Jan. 6 insurrection. 

No fence was placed around the U.S. Capitol, with the Capitol Police chief saying there was nothing to suggest Saturday’s rally would be violent.

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk