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Women’s March event canceled because rally-goers fear event would be ‘overwhelmingly white’

California Women’s March canceled because rally organizers fear event would be ‘overwhelmingly white’

  • Women’s March planners in Humboldt County, California, canceled the event because it was ‘lacking representation from several perspectives’ 
  • Critics decried the decision pointing out that the particular region of California is overwhelmingly white to begin with
  • The cancellation of the January 19 march is the latest round of controversy for the Women’s March movement already dogged by accusations of anti-Semitism

Organizers canceled the Women’s March event in Northern California slated for next month over concerns that the rally-goers would be ‘overwhelmingly white.’ 

The Women’s March planners say the rally that was to be held in Eureka on January 19, would not represent the diversity of the area, according to KRCR-TV. 

‘Up to this point, the participants have been overwhelmingly white, lacking representation from several perspectives in our community,’ a press release from the organizers stated. ‘Instead of pushing forward with crucial voices absent, the organizing team will take time for more outreach. 

The organizers say they will continue to discuss how to broaden representation of Humboldt County in a future event, and is considering holding a celebration of International Women’s Day in March.

A demonstrator holds a sign while gathering on the National Mall during the Women’s March on Washington in January 2017. The Eureka rally in 2019 was canceled due to a lack of diversity

‘I was appalled to be honest,’ said Amy Sawyer Long to the Washington Times. ‘I understand wanting a diverse group. However, we live in a predominantly white area… not to mention how is it beneficial to cancel? No matter the race people still want their voices heard.’ 

Census bureau data as of July shows Humboldt County, California, being 74 percent identifying as white.

The cancellation in Eureka follows on the heals of an announced cancellation of the Women’s March in Chicago where organizers blamed cost and lack of volunteers for preventing them going forward.

After the first Women’s March on January 21, 2017. the day after President Trump’s inauguration, the national organization has taken a number of public relations hits from accusations of anti-Semitism.

Demonstrations like this one also took place in cities around the globe, but since 2017, the national leadership of the Women's March has been dealing with controversy and attrition

Demonstrations like this one also took place in cities around the globe, but since 2017, the national leadership of the Women’s March has been dealing with controversy and attrition

Tamika Mallory, a Women's March leader, has been under pressure to condemn the anti-Semitic rhetoric of inflammatory Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan

Tamika Mallory, a Women’s March leader, has been under pressure to condemn the anti-Semitic rhetoric of inflammatory Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan

Nation of Islam leader, Louis Farrakhan, has been linked to leadership of the Women's March

Nation of Islam leader, Louis Farrakhan, has been linked to leadership of the Women’s March

In February, Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan praised Women’s March co-President Tamika Mallory and declared ‘the powerful Jews are my enemy,’ according to Fox News. The organizing leadership have been condemned for not condemning the remarks quickly enough.

Actress Alyssa Milano even pulled out of speaking at the Women’s March in 2019 over the alleged ties to Farrakhan and his history of making anti-Semitic remarks.

Vanessa Wruble, a former organizer in Brooklyn, claims she was removed from the organization because she was Jewish, an allegation that Tamika Mallory denies.

In November, a statement on behalf of the organization was released by Linda Sarsour, one of the Women’s March leaders.  

‘We should have been faster and clearer in helping people understand our values and our commitment to fighting anti-semitism. We regret that,’ the statement read. ‘Every member of our movement matters to us — including our incredible Jewish and LGBTQ members. We are deeply sorry for the harm we have caused, but we see you, we love you, and we are fighting with you.’

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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