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World’s first floating nuclear power plant sets sail from St Petersburg

The world’s first floating nuclear reactor set sail on its maiden voyage from Russia bound for the Arctic far east.

Akademik Lomonosov was on Saturday towed out of St Petersburg harbour where it was built, equipped with two nuclear reactors.

The 21,500-tonne ship will be pulled through the Baltic sea and around the tip of Norway to Murmansk, a city of 300,000, to be loaded with fuel.

The world’s first floating nuclear reactor set sail on its maiden voyage from Russia bound for the arctic far east

Akademik Lomonosov was on Saturday towed out of St Petersburg harbour where it was built, equipped with two nuclear reactors

Akademik Lomonosov was on Saturday towed out of St Petersburg harbour where it was built, equipped with two nuclear reactors

Russia has at least another seven floating nuclear reactors planned and China is working on building its own to launch in 2020.

Russia has at least another seven floating nuclear reactors planned and China is working on building its own to launch in 2020.

From there it will continue on to Chukotka, over the straight from Alaska, to power the port town of Pevek and oil rigs when their reactor shuts down in 2019.

The £70 million behemoth is 144m long 30m wide and 10m high, needs a crew of 69 to operate it, and provides 70 megawatts of electricity or 300 of heat.

About 45,000 tons of fuel or diesel oil will not have to be used as a result of the plant, according to its manufacturer OKBM Afrikantov.

The project is controversial for its potential environmental impacts with Greenpeace denouncing it as a ‘floating Chernobyl’ and ‘nuclear Titanic’.

The 21,500-tonne ship will be pulled through the Baltic sea and around the tip of Norway to Murmansk, a city of 300,000, to be loaded with fuel

The 21,500-tonne ship will be pulled through the Baltic sea and around the tip of Norway to Murmansk, a city of 300,000, to be loaded with fuel

From there it will continue on to Chukotka, over the straight from Alaska, to power the port town of Pevek and oil rigs when their reactor shuts down in 2019

From there it will continue on to Chukotka, over the straight from Alaska, to power the port town of Pevek and oil rigs when their reactor shuts down in 2019

The behemoth generator is 144m long 30m wide and 10m high, needs a crew of 69 to operate it, and provides 70 megawatts of electricity or 300 of heat

The behemoth generator is 144m long 30m wide and 10m high, needs a crew of 69 to operate it, and provides 70 megawatts of electricity or 300 of heat

About 45,000 tons of fuel or diesel oil will not have to be used as a result of the plant, according to its manufacturer OKBM Afrikantov

About 45,000 tons of fuel or diesel oil will not have to be used as a result of the plant, according to its manufacturer OKBM Afrikantov

The project is controversial for its potential environmental impacts with Greenpeace denouncing it as a 'floating Chernobyl' and 'nuclear Titanic'

The project is controversial for its potential environmental impacts with Greenpeace denouncing it as a ‘floating Chernobyl’ and ‘nuclear Titanic’

They are considered very effective for generating electricity in remote areas and can be moved on if not required, or be used to power desalination plants

They are considered very effective for generating electricity in remote areas and can be moved on if not required, or be used to power desalination plants

‘Nuclear reactors bobbing around the Arctic Ocean will pose a shockingly obvious threat to a fragile environment which is already under enormous pressure from climate change,’ nuclear expert Jan Haverkamp said.

‘The flat-bottomed hull and the floating nuclear power plant’s lack of self-propulsion makes it particularly vulnerable to tsunamis and cyclones.’

Russia has at least another seven floating nuclear reactors planned and China is working on building its own to launch in 2020.

Other countries like Algeria, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Argentina have shown interest in hiring ships that could become available as more are built.

They are considered very effective for generating electricity in remote areas and can be moved on if not required, or be used to power desalination plants.

Other countries like Algeria, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Argentina have shown interest in hiring ships that could become available as more are built

Other countries like Algeria, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Argentina have shown interest in hiring ships that could become available as more are built

Workers admire the view from on board the ship as it is towed out of the harbour

Workers admire the view from on board the ship as it is towed out of the harbour



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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