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Yoga influencer is labeled a ‘charlatan’ after saying she may stop seeing her vaccinated clients

A Philadelphia-based yogi and ‘healer’ is being blasted as ‘stupid’ and a ‘charlatan’ after she said she may stop seeing vaccinated clients because of their different ‘energy.’ 

Godis Oyá tweeted to her 43,800 followers on October 2: ‘Highly re-considering sharing healing space with vax*ed clients. It’s just a different energy and energetic imprint carried, in which eye [sic] do not wish to take on at this time, or ever.’

While the tweet earned a few hundreds likes, it was also flooded with critical comments from other social media users calling her out for her ‘dangerous’ and ‘disingenuous’ opinion — and the critical voices grew so loud that Godis Oyá deleted the tweet.

Called out: A Philadelphia-based yogi and ‘healer’ is being blasted as ‘stupid’ and a ‘charlatan’ after she said she may stop seeing vaccinated clients because of their different ‘energy’

Practice: Oyá, who owns Oyá Healing Space in Philadelphia's Germantown, offers an array of services including guided yoga, massage, guided meditation, sound healing

Practice: Oyá, who owns Oyá Healing Space in Philadelphia’s Germantown, offers an array of services including guided yoga, massage, guided meditation, sound healing

She tweeted: 'Highly re-considering sharing healing space with vax*ed clients. It¿s just a different energy and energetic imprint carried, in which eye [sic] do not wish to take on'

She tweeted: ‘Highly re-considering sharing healing space with vax*ed clients. It’s just a different energy and energetic imprint carried, in which eye [sic] do not wish to take on’

Oyá, who owns Oyá Healing Space in Philadelphia’s Germantown, offers an array of services including guided yoga practice, massage, guided meditation, sound healing.

Though she usually posts spiritual an uplifting messages, her October 2 tweet was more controversial — and was quickly met with critical replies. 

‘Y’all are not spiritual or healers y’all are unemployed and stupid,’ wrote one.

‘Just outed yourself as a charlatan,’ said another, while a third wrote: ‘Is this only for the COVID vaccine? Other vaccines we got since birth pass the vibe check?’

‘Will your non vaxxed energetic imprint suit you on a ventilator?’ quipped yet another. 

Several argued that as a black woman tweeting to a large black audience, Oyá’s view is especially harmful.

‘The black community is dying in droves and this girl talking bout energy lmfao,’ wrote one. 

Backlash: Her October 2 tweet was more controversial ¿ and was quickly met with critical replies

Backlash: Her October 2 tweet was more controversial — and was quickly met with critical replies

‘Stigmatizing people protecting their lives and yours is bizarre and dangerous especially for Black people dying so disproportionately. ‘ wrote another. 

Last year in the US, according to the CDC, black and Latinx people were almost three times more likely to die from COVID than white people, due in part to economic disparities. 

Mistrust among black people is deep-seated. Experts largely attribute it to medical experiments that were conducted during the eras of slavery and segregation. 

‘It’s really disappointing to see someone who claims to be a healer — and who has over 40K followers — publicly suggesting that vaccinations are at odds with having good spiritual being. Whatever you believe, vaccinations are safe. They keep you alive,’ said yet another.  

‘These takes r disingenuous not only is it disingenuous its dangerous.. are you aware of the chemicals that r ingested by breathing your city air or eating from plastics or being in America, Also what type of spirituality / healing is this that seems to lack energetic sovereignty,’ wrote one more..

‘What you’ve said is dangerous and if you don’t understand that I doubt your connection to source. You have a following of 49K and have just effectively told all of them not to get the vaccine…allow them to make that decision on their own..to sway them with this tweet…not good,’ added yet another.

Problematic: Several argued that as a black woman tweeting to a large black audience, Oyá's view is especially harmful

Problematic: Several argued that as a black woman tweeting to a large black audience, Oyá’s view is especially harmful

Oyá has since deleted her tweet, though she doesn't appear to be revising her opinion, and has responded with several new tweets

Oyá has since deleted her tweet, though she doesn't appear to be revising her opinion, and has responded with several new tweets

Her stance: Oyá has since deleted her tweet, though she doesn’t appear to be revising her opinion, and has responded with several new tweets

'It¿s actually scary how much of our indigenous/black people are advocating for this vaxx. They are the first to attack for having views in opposition. Waist deep into this system,' she said

 ‘It’s actually scary how much of our indigenous/black people are advocating for this vaxx. They are the first to attack for having views in opposition. Waist deep into this system,’ she said

'As healers, it is your divine right to be selective about what energy you allow into your space,' she said. 'Regardless of the ill sense of entitlement people tend to project onto you'

‘As healers, it is your divine right to be selective about what energy you allow into your space,’ she said. ‘Regardless of the ill sense of entitlement people tend to project onto you’

Oyá has since deleted her tweet, though she doesn’t appear to be revising her opinion, and has responded with several new tweets. 

‘There are other ways to protect the immune system besides an experimental vaxx. Clearly sickness is no worry of mine. Eye [sic] have all the tools + wisdom required to maintain my natural immunity. Giving thanks for this blessed life,’ she wrote.

‘It’s actually scary how much of our indigenous/black people are advocating for this vaxx. They are the first to attack for having views in opposition. Waist deep into this system,’ she went on.

‘As healers, it is your divine right to be selective about what energy you allow into your space. Regardless of the ill sense of entitlement people tend to project onto you. The tendency of making you feel “bad” about the energetic boundaries you’ve created is a trauma response.’

How a dark history of medical experiments and abuse paved the way to distrust of medicine among black communities

Experts say Black American’s reluctance to get a COVID-19 vaccine is understandable given America’s history of conducting medical experiments on Black people. 

Among the most notorious were in Tuskegee, Alabama, where when Black men were unwittingly used to study the effects of syphilis between 1932 and 1972.

The study, which was originally called the ‘Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male,’ began in 1932. It was run by a government agency, the United States Public Health Service Commissioned Corps, and the Tuskegee Institute.

The study involved 600 Black men, 399 of whom had syphilis, who were lured to particpate with the promise of free health care and food.

However, most did not know they had the syphilis, and the scientists who claimed to be treating them for ‘bad blood’ did not tell them — because the purpose of the study was to ‘observe the natural history of untreated syphilis.’

Even though penicillin was available to treat syphilis by 1943, it was not administered to the patients in the study, and because many were not informed by the doctors treating them that they had syphilis, they did not seek penicillin out on their own.

The study only came to light after the Associated Press published a story about it in 1972.

By then, 128 patients in the study had died of syphilis or its complications. Forty of their wives had also been infected, and 19 of their children had acquired congenital syphilis.  

The study is pointed to as one of several reasons that Black people are largely more distrustful of medicine.

In 2018, a statue of 19th-century American physician James Marion Sims, considered the father of modern gynaecology, was removed from New York’s Central Park because of experiments he had conducted on slaves. 

‘We know that lack of trust is a major cause for reluctance, especially in communities of color. And that lack of trust is not without good reason, as the Tuskegee studies occurred in our lifetimes,’ former Surgeon General Jerome Adams said in December.

‘A lot of [skepticism] is based on distrust and based on historical experiences many of these groups have experienced,’ added Marcus Plescia, chief medical examiner for the Association of State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO).

‘They are not anti-vaxxers, they are vaccine-hesitant. We need to find ways to reach them and build that trust,’ he added, saying showing Black people on TV getting the country’s first vaccinations is ‘probably a good strategy.’

However, vaccine hesistancy has been dropping among Black adults. According to a new Pew Research Center survey, 70 percent of Black adults and 72 percent of white adults have received at least one dose of the vaccine

Pew’s survey found that white evangelical Protestants and those with no health insurance are most likely to remain unvaccinated. 

And Republicans were much less likely to be vaccinated than Democrats. 

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk