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Yorkshire Shepherdess Amanda Owen hits back at critic who tells her she’s ‘not a showbiz star’

Yorkshire Shepherdess Amanda Owen has slammed a social media critic for urging her to ‘stay true to herself’ – before reminding her she’s ‘not a showbiz star’.

The mother-of-nine, 46, lives with her brood and her husband Clive Owen, 66, at 2,000 acre Ravenseat farm in the Yorkshire Dales after moving to the land in 1996 to train as a shepherdess.   

Amanda has grown a large fan following thanks to the popularity of Channel 5 show, Our Yorkshire Farm. However, one person on social media was forced to apologise after suggesting the busy mother had changed since rising to fame.  

Taking to Twitter, Amanda shared several snaps of herself working on the farm and at a book signing and wrote: ‘Time for a catch up, it has been a super busy time. Been wearing more than a few different hats metaphorically speaking.’ 

In response, the critic penned: ‘Stay true to yourself people fell in love with your life as you all are, not as a showbiz star.’ 

Yorkshire Shepherdess Amanda Owen (pictured), 46, has slammed a social media critic for urging her to ‘stay true to herself’ – before reminding her she’s ‘not a showbiz star’

Amanda shared several snaps of herself working on the farm and at a book signing and wrote: 'Time for a catch up, it has been a super busy time. Been wearing more than a few different hats metaphorically speaking' (pictured)

Amanda shared several snaps of herself working on the farm and at a book signing and wrote: ‘Time for a catch up, it has been a super busy time. Been wearing more than a few different hats metaphorically speaking’ (pictured)

One critic penned: 'Stay true to yourself people fell in love with your life as you all are, not as a showbiz star' (pictured)

One critic penned: ‘Stay true to yourself people fell in love with your life as you all are, not as a showbiz star’ (pictured)

However, an unimpressed Amanda hit back: ‘Shearing Sheep driving tractor to make hay to feed Sheep, signing books (about Sheep), public speaking (about Sheep).

‘Serving tea to folk who watch programme & read (about Sheep).’

She also went on to defend her friend Jeremy Clarkson and continued: ‘As @JeremyClarkson has highlighted until food production, countryside management is valued we do what pays the bills.’

The critic quickly apologised and wrote: ‘Sorry, I didn’t think.’

The mother-of-nine lives with her brood and her husband Clive Owen, 66, at 2,000 acre Ravenseat farm in the Yorkshire Dales after moving to the land in 1996 to train as a shepherdess (pictured)

The mother-of-nine lives with her brood and her husband Clive Owen, 66, at 2,000 acre Ravenseat farm in the Yorkshire Dales after moving to the land in 1996 to train as a shepherdess (pictured)

An unimpressed Amanda hit back: 'Shearing Sheep driving tractor to make hay to feed Sheep, signing books (about Sheep), public speaking (about Sheep). 'Serving tea to folk who watch programme & read (about Sheep)' (pictured)

An unimpressed Amanda hit back: ‘Shearing Sheep driving tractor to make hay to feed Sheep, signing books (about Sheep), public speaking (about Sheep). ‘Serving tea to folk who watch programme & read (about Sheep)’ (pictured)

The comments come just days after the Yorkshire Shepherdess revealed how she wasn’t impressed when she first saw Ravenseat. 

Speaking on his BBC Radio 4 podcast The Poet Laureate Has Gone to His Shed, Simon Armitage said: ‘I read somewhere that when you first went there, had you gone to buy a ram or something, and you weren’t that impressed.

‘I think I remember reading somewhere that you said it had squelchy carpets and smoke on the wall. I think you might have described it as a s**t hole actually.’

Amanda replied: ‘Yeah I think s**t hole pretty much covers it. It has improved slightly. I guess in a way we’ve put this place on the map, it’s a busy place, it’s always been a busy place.’

Owen continued: ‘If you go back in history, there has been people living and farming at Ravenseat for a thousand years, so imagine that, it’s a place with a lot of history.

‘It’s a place that over the years it was farmed during the summer and vacated in the Winter. As time went on it became a little hamlet.

‘The wood shed is an old chapel, still got the arched windows. It was a stopping place where the old ponies came through with coal heading into Cumbria. There was even one point an inn there.

Amanda (pictured) has previously said she will leave it up to her children to decide if they wish to become shepherds and stay on the family farm

Amanda (pictured) has previously said she will leave it up to her children to decide if they wish to become shepherds and stay on the family farm

‘It is a place that has such a history, it’s to do with people. It’s what fired up my enthusiasm for this place.’

Amanda also went on to tell the poet how she will leave it up to her children to decide if they wish to become shepherds and stay on the family farm. 

‘I don’t look that far ahead,’ she explained. ‘I say to the children they can be whatever they want to be and go wherever they want to go.

‘Of course they go through stages where they’re more enthusiastic about the countryside, as they get older into their teens, obviously they want to go away.

‘Raven (her eldest child) when she went to York, she was heading to the bright lights, couldn’t wait to get to a place where her phone worked and she could order a takeaway without it being cold and stuck to the paper – it’s all brilliant.

‘But you know within a month or two I’m getting text messages asking how to make Yorkshire pudding tins out of bean cans and can you prove a loaf of bread on a radiator when you haven’t got on open fire.

‘So it’s instilled into you the kind of life you lead in the countryside.’



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