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You can now buy a one-storey flatpack HOUSE


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Ikea is now selling Flatpack HOMES – but how long will it take to put it together?

  • Japanese home goods company MUJI started selling compact two-storey prefabricated houses in 2015
  • They received a lot of attention at the time for being affordable, costing the average buyer just $215,000
  • MUJI last released a tiny hut in 2017, which was $36,000, and are now back with a one level option
  • It’s considerably cheaper than the two-storey offerings at $211,000, but isn’t available outside Japan just yet

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Japanese home goods company MUJI has designed its first one-story flatpack house featuring a large bedroom, kitchen and dining area – as well as a stunning outdoor deck with sunken entertaining spot – for $211,000.

Likened to the same minimalist style flaunted by Sweden’s IKEA stores, MUJI made a foray into the property market with two-storey prefabricated houses in 2015 that would set you back $215,000.

Its last release was a tiny bedroom hut in 2017, which was set to become the ultimate house extender, but the well-known company has been quiet on the house front ever since.

Sadly they are not yet available in Australia but MUJI has concept stores in both Sydney and Melbourne, proving that they might be launching Down Under soon. 

Japanese home goods company MUJI has designed its first one-story flat-pack house featuring a large bedroom, kitchen and dining area (pictured from the outside)

The living, kitchen and bedroom are all connected in one wooden space that can be arranged as the homeowner sees fit

The living, kitchen and bedroom are all connected in one wooden space that can be arranged as the homeowner sees fit

The latest Yano-no-ie design can adapt to lots of different living conditions, whether you’re in a cityscape or stationed in a rural town.

‘Thanks to sliding doors that open out onto a deck it’s also the result of a concerted effort to combine indoor and outdoor living,’ Concrete Playground reported.

It’s one of the largest blueprints MUJI offers with 72 square metres of floor space, which includes a bathroom and the outdoor area, with the bedroom acting as a handy reading space or study if you need it.

It's one of the largest blueprints MUJI offers with 72 square metres of floor space, which includes a bathroom and the outdoor area, with the bedroom (pictured) acting as a handy reading space or study if you need it

It’s one of the largest blueprints MUJI offers with 72 square metres of floor space, which includes a bathroom and the outdoor area, with the bedroom (pictured) acting as a handy reading space or study if you need it

The living area faces the deck so you always feel as though you are entertaining guests in the small space

The living area faces the deck so you always feel as though you are entertaining guests in the small space

'In the afternoon you can set up a table in the garden to have a dinner with friends, and spend the evening around a bonfire,' MUJI writes

‘In the afternoon you can set up a table in the garden to have a dinner with friends, and spend the evening around a bonfire,’ MUJI writes

Are flatpack homes legal in Australia? 

Flatpack homes fall under ‘relocatable homes’ category, which are moveable dwellings that exclude tents, caravans, or vehicles. But there are two things you should consider if you’re considering living in a flat pack home:

Local regulations: While there is no federal law banning building flat pack homes, it’s best to consult your local zoning group or town hall about the permits needed. You also need to hire a building surveyor and other professionals to look at the land you’re planning to live on.

Environmental planning: Like all residential and business structures, flat pack homes are also regulated by the Environmental Planning and Assessment act. You have to comply with their ruling if you ever want to install a flat pack home in any area.

Source: Better Homes and Gardens 

The house is made out of Japanese cedar, the same material that much of its furniture is fashioned out of, so you can use all of their designs to fit it out.

‘If you have a kitchen with a counter, the kitchen is not just a place to cook, but a place for families to gather and use together,’ MUJI’s website said.

‘In addition to sleeping, the bedroom will be multifunctional, able to be used for reading, using a computer, and having a drink in the evening.

'If you have a kitchen with a counter, the kitchen (pictured) is not just a place to cook, but a place for families to gather and use together,' MUJI's website said

‘If you have a kitchen with a counter, the kitchen (pictured) is not just a place to cook, but a place for families to gather and use together,’ MUJI’s website said

The side door faces out onto the street so people can easily enter and exit the space

The side door faces out onto the street so people can easily enter and exit the space

‘If you treat it as a multifunctional place through facilities and furniture instead of a place where roles are assigned one by one, you can use the limited space without exhaustion.’

There are no steps between the deck and the floor in the living room so you feel as though the area is fully opened and connected to the ground.

‘In the afternoon you can set up a table in the garden to have a dinner with friends, and spend the evening around a bonfire,’ MUJI writes.

‘Bringing out activities that are originally performed indoors is a way to associate with a new garden.’

Priced at $211,000 it’s far more economical than your average house but sadly they aren’t available outside of Japan yet. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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