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Young Australian lollipop ladies answer question EVERYONE asks them about working in traffic control

Australian lollipop ladies answer the question EVERYONE wants to know about the job – and the huge downside despite making $2k a week

  • Female Aussie traffic controllers join viral ‘Questions I get asked’ TikTok craze
  • They gave answers to several questions including whether they get hit on
  • Downsides of the job include being catcalled and having to deal with angry men 


Australian traffic controllers have taken to social media to answer questions about the job, including one everyone apparently asks them. 

Amelia Brady and Unity Adams confirmed that they do get hit on while trying to do their roadside jobs.

‘All the time,’ Ms Brady confirmed in a video filmed in her car while on the job in Perth.

Amelia Brady (pictured above) and Unity Adams confirmed in separate TikToks as part of the ‘Questions I get asked’ viral craze that yes, they do get hit on while trying to do their roadside jobs

Meanwhile, Ms Adams, who is also a nursing student and online bikini model, claims she’s ‘hit on 24/7,’ while working in traffic control. 

She answered questions about the job under a video titled  ‘what’s it like working as a traffic controller – female edition’.   

Ms Adams exposed the realities of the job, which included getting cat-called every 20 minutes, having angry men yell at her to get off the road and being forced to listen to tradies constantly talking about other women.

Are traffic controllers well paid?

It’s complicated, but usually not as well as you’d think.

The award rate nationally for a traffic controller is $29.79 per hour – but it can be as much as $120 an hour.

The pay rate is better for traffic controllers on union jobs, but that work is harder to find and in short supply.  

Traffic controllers with the CFMEU union in Victoria can earn up to $55.08 per hour. 

The rate climbs to $99.15 per hour if working overtime. 

On public holidays, they make up to $121.18 per hour.

Full-time traffic controller roles in Victoria are typically advertised to earn between $50,000 and $70,000 a year. 

According Seek.com.au, the median annual salary in NSW for a traffic controller is $76,249.  

Across Australia, the most common salary advertised for traffic controllers is between $40,000 and $60,000.

Unity Adams (pictured above) claimed she gets hit on '24/7' while working, then clarified that her male colleagues didn't hit on her, just pedestrians

Unity Adams (pictured above) claimed she gets hit on ’24/7′ while working, then clarified that her male colleagues didn’t hit on her, just pedestrians

She says while her male colleagues did not hit on her, members of the public did.

‘This video is not about male colleagues or anyone I work with. It is about the public pedestrians that walk by.’

Traffic controllers have taken to TikTok in recent months, sometimes boasting about their pay – which can be up to $2,000 a week in some cases – and other times complaining about boring work exposed to hot and cold weather.  

‘For everyone hyping traffic control as a good job, why are you lying?’ said Paris Taylor, with an expression that looked like boredom crossed with frustration, describing the role as the ‘worst job ever’.

Another Aussie female traffic controller, Paris Taylor (pictured above), had a different verdict on the work in her TikTok video

Another Aussie female traffic controller, Paris Taylor (pictured above), had a different verdict on the work in her TikTok video

When another woman asked about the pay, Ms Taylor said: ‘Only pays well if you are doing long hours.’

Last month another Melbourne woman Maria Kefalas, 21, vented on social media that traffic control is often seen as ‘easy money’.

‘I’ve been seeing a lot of TikTok (videos) in regards to traffic control, and they are all positive,’ she ranted in her post.

‘They tell you how much money they make and how many hours they work.

‘They are giving people false hope about traffic control… it has got to be the most inconsistent job I have ever done in my life.’

‘Some weeks yes, I had five days of work – but then I was off for two weeks,’ she told Daily Mail Australia.

‘On other occasions I had phone calls at 11pm asking me to be on a job site at 6am the following day or to drive two hours out of Melbourne on short notice for a 12 hour shift.

‘It isn’t a stable income by any means.’

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Read more at DailyMail.co.uk