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Young people are turning their backs on summer jobs during a break from studies to sell goods online

Young people are turning their backs on summer jobs during a break from studies to sell goods online instead, research shows

  • Some 51 per cent of students make money from buying and selling clothes
  • They snap up bargains from charity shops and sell them for a marked up price
  • Students say on average they can earn £180 each month running the business 

Students are now more likely to spend their long summer holidays running eBay empires than pulling pints or working in shops, a survey found.

A total of 51 per cent are shunning traditional summer jobs, instead making money from buying and selling clothes online.

They snap up bargains from charity shops and wholesalers and sell them on for a marked-up price. They can be their own boss and make cash from the comfort of their bedrooms.

A total of 51 per cent are shunning traditional summer jobs, instead making money from buying and selling clothes online (file image)

Students said on average they earned £180 a month running such businesses. The poll of 3,000 students found hospitality or bar work was the second most popular choice, with 43 per cent opting for this. Almost a third of students – 30 per cent – said that they earned money from tutoring in their specialist subjects.

Other methods to make money included dog walking, filling out online surveys and working for taxi firm Uber or food delivery service Deliveroo. And 11 per cent of students said they do not work at all over the summer, with most receiving money from parents to fund their lifestyle.

The poll was carried out by tutor service Tutor House. The company’s founder Alex Dyer said: ‘It is no surprise students are looking for different ways to earn extra cash. When we commissioned this survey I would never have guessed that buying and selling clothes online would be at the top of the list.’ 

They snap up bargains from charity shops and wholesalers and sell them on for a marked-up price (file image)

They snap up bargains from charity shops and wholesalers and sell them on for a marked-up price (file image)

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk