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Young woman criticises charity shops for being more expensive than retailers like Kmart

Young woman slams op shops for being more expensive than retailers like Kmart: ‘It seems like a scam’

  • A young Australian woman has sparked debate around the role of charity shops
  • She claims that prices are so heavily marked up that ‘poor people can’t afford it’
  • Instead they are resorting to purchasing cheap clothes from retailers like Kmart 

The anonymous girl, who goes by Raiimouse on TikTok, replied to a video thread

A young Australian woman has called out charity shops for selling secondhand clothes that are pricier than picking up a brand new ensemble from a store like Kmart, Target or Big W.

The anonymous girl, who goes by Raiimouse on TikTok, replied to a video thread with the title: ‘What’s a scam that’s become so normalised that we don’t even realise it’s a scam anymore?’

She was quick to reply with her thoughts on stores like Lifeline, St Vincent De Paul and the Red Cross, claiming that she felt their prices didn’t align with their purpose anymore.

‘The fact that it’s more expensive to buy the same singlet from Lifeline or St Vincent De Paul then it is to buy it brand new, off the rack, at Kmart,’ she said.

‘Like it should not be more expensive to buy something secondhand than it is to buy something brand new.

‘I don’t understand why these charities still need to make so much profit when all the people that work for them are volunteers. It’s not actually helping poor people anymore to buy things from there.

‘It seems like a scam.’ 

She clarified to say that individuals who run the charities are most likely paid but those who work at their shop fronts are predominantly volunteers. 

Her followers agreed with the sentiment, arguing that times had changed recently.

‘Thrift shops used to be so cheap in the 90s and early 2000s. Not anymore,’ one fan said.

She clarified to say that individuals who run the charities are most likely paid but those who work at their shop fronts are predominantly volunteers

She clarified to say that individuals who run the charities are most likely paid but those who work at their shop fronts are predominantly volunteers

Poll

Do you think charity stores are more expensive these days?

‘The word charity being used with these businesses is a joke,’ said another. 

A third added: ‘As a single mum it’s hard to afford things secondhand now’.

Not everyone agreed though, with some stating that they needed to earn a profit to pay for leasing the shopfront and a lot of the money goes back into food and clothing appeals.

‘I don’t think comparing to Kmart is a good idea. Kmart are cheap because of their supply chain,’ one woman replied.

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