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Topshop mogul Sir Philip Green faces £3million legal bill over injunction battle

Sir Philip Green faces £3million legal bill after dropping ‘pointless’ injunction over sexual harassment row – but still threatens to sue his alleged victims if they speak out

  • Clothing chain billionaire tried to stop newspaper publishing claims against him
  • But his identity was revealed in the House of Lords and claims were published
  • He now drops legal claims, but threatens action against ‘gagging clause’ workers
  • Green now faces a £3million legal bill over the long-running High Court case

Sir Philip Green has formally dropped his legal action attempting to keep an injunction in place against The Telegraph

Topshop mogul Sir Philip Green has formally dropped his legal battle to keep in place gagging orders over sexual harassment, race discrimination and bullying claims made against him by former employees.

The fashion chain billionaire had been trying to maintain an injunction preventing The Telegraph Media Group from reporting the claims.

In a statement issued last week, it was announced the retail tycoon was dropping the case because it was ‘pointless’ after he was named in Parliament as the businessman behind an injunction against the newspaper.

In a ruling today, Mr Justice Warby granted the Topshop owner permission to discontinue the proceedings. 

Green, 66, now reportedly faces a £3million legal bill over the case and the possibility of more details about the claims being published.

The judge ordered Green to pick up the Telegraph’s legal bill after saying his firm’s pursuit of the case in recent weeks was ‘well outside the norm’.

Sir Philip has strenuously denied the allegations and today issued a statement warning former workers who signed controversial non-disclosure agreements (NDAs) from speaking out. 

Sir Philip, pictured with daughter Chloe and wife Tina, has strenuously denied the allegations

Sir Philip, pictured with daughter Chloe and wife Tina, has strenuously denied the allegations

James Price QC said the decision was prompted by Lord Hain’s identification of Sir Philip in the House of Lords in October last year, a day after the Telegraph ran a front-page story saying it was prevented from naming a ‘mystery businessman’.

The injunction was first sought after Sir Philip and an executive at his Arcadia firm were contacted by a journalist in July last year.

The newspaper intended to publish allegations of misconduct made against Sir Philip by the employees – who all received substantial payments after settling their claims.

In a statement issued after the ruling, Sir Philip and the board of the Arcadia Group said the former employees who signed the the non-disclosure agreements (NDAs) were under ‘ongoing obligations’ to honour the agreements.

The statement continued: ‘The Telegraph and its owners must now decide whether to do the decent thing and respect the NDAs.

‘If not, they will expose their sources to potential further legal actions and significant losses. Their fate is now in the Telegraph’s hands.’

 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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