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A man who was told ‘infertile’ after cancer becomes a dad

A Queensland man who was told he was infertile by doctors after he was treated for stage four cancer has become a dad for the first time.

Grant Sanderson, 33, who was diagnosed with brain cancer on New Year’s Day in 2011, was told that if he didn’t have immediate treatment, he’d have less than a week to live.

‘The news just completely shook Grant and his family but he is the most positive person in the world and never once let himself believe he was going to die,’ his wife, Sheridan Sanderson, 25, told FEMAIL.

On top of this Grant was also told that because of the radiation treatment he went through he wouldn’t be able to father any children but October last year his son Dylan was born.

Grant Sanderson, 33, (pictured with his son) was told that he was infertile due to cancer treatment he had undergone but months later Dylan was born

‘It was very sad to think that I would not be able to have children, all I have ever wanted was to have a son,’ he told FEMAIL.

‘Right before I started treatment the doctors pulled me aside and said that if I ever wanted to have children I would need to have sperm frozen as there would be almost no chance after putting my body through chemo and radiation.’

Grant did as the doctors suggested and had his sperm frozen but because his body was already fighting ‘a massive cancer’ the sperm count was extremely low. 

‘After we got engaged we knew we wanted to have a baby. Sheridan has a beautiful daughter from a past relation. [She] wanted so much to be a big sister and of course I wanted so much to be a dad,’ Grant said.

‘Sheridan began to organise meetings with the fertility specialists when I said to her “why don’t we get my sperm tested again first” because I was feeling so healthy.’

'It was very sad to think that I would not be able to have children, all I have ever wanted was to have a son,' he told FEMAIL

‘It was very sad to think that I would not be able to have children, all I have ever wanted was to have a son,’ he told FEMAIL

'After we got engaged we knew we wanted to have a baby. Sheridan has a beautiful daughter from a past relation that wanted so much to be a big sister,' Grant said (all three pictured)

‘After we got engaged we knew we wanted to have a baby. Sheridan has a beautiful daughter from a past relation that wanted so much to be a big sister,’ Grant said (all three pictured)

Lucky they did try again because only four days after Grant had an appointment to test his sperm the results came back positive. 

‘Every thing was great again! Three or four months later Sheridan walked out of the bathroom and handed me a test strip with two bright pink lines, we were having a baby,’ he said.

Grant explained that although he was originally shocked by his cancer diagnosis, he knew something was wrong. 

Only four days after Grant had an appointment to test his sperm the results came back positive and they tried again

Their son Dylan was born healthy in October 2017 (pictured)

Only four days after Grant had an appointment to test his sperm the results came back positive and they tried again

Grant explained that although he was originally shocked by his cancer diagnosis, he knew something was wrong

Grant explained that although he was originally shocked by his cancer diagnosis, he knew something was wrong

‘I had been getting really bad headaches weeks prior and had lost a lot of weight,’ he told FEMAIL.

‘I was more sad for my family, I didn’t want them to hurt so I felt I had to be strong for them.’ 

To fight the cancer he had to go through surgery, chemotherapy and radiation which doctors said would extend his life by only 18 months.

Grant’s life expectancy is now the same as the rest of us, but the chances of him developing early Alzheimer’s disease is quite high.

‘The doctors and oncologists don’t really know what to say – no one has ever lived this long after being diagnosed with Glioblastoma. Most die before 18 months unfortunately,’ Sheridan said.   

To fight the cancer he had to go through surgery, chemotherapy and radiation which doctors said would extend his life by 18 months

To fight the cancer he had to go through surgery, chemotherapy and radiation which doctors said would extend his life by 18 months

This being said, the future is looking bright for Grant and when he was told the incredible news that he was cancer-free it felt like he had a new lease on life. 

‘Everything in my life was changing and it felt great. I was being put on the path that would ultimately lead me to meet Sheridan and finally have the family I always wanted with the perfect person,’ he said.

‘Towards the end of my chemo I met Sheridan, it didn’t take long to realise she was the one.

‘She was so out there, funny and kind and never once treated me differently because of what I was dealing with and the effects.’  

The future is looking bright for Grant and when he was told the incredible news that he was cancer free it felt like he had a new lease on life

The future is looking bright for Grant and when he was told the incredible news that he was cancer free it felt like he had a new lease on life

Grant met Sheridan towards the end of his chemo and it didn't take long for him to realise she was 'the one'

Grant met Sheridan towards the end of his chemo and it didn’t take long for him to realise she was ‘the one’

Unfortunately Grant still faces complications with his health.

‘Due to the removal of the tumour, which was so big at 10 by 12 centimetres, and the radiation, Grant now suffers some brain damage and a complicated form of epilepsy,’ Sheridan explained.

‘He is missing the majority of his frontal lobe so the fact he can walk and talk is just ridiculously amazing.

As it is his frontal lobe that has been damaged, his memory, speech and motor functions have been effected but Grant has chosen not to focus on that. 

'Due to the removal of the tumour, which was so big at 10 by 12 centimetres, and the radiation, Grant now suffers some brain damage and a complicated form of epilepsy,' Sheridan explained

‘Due to the removal of the tumour, which was so big at 10 by 12 centimetres, and the radiation, Grant now suffers some brain damage and a complicated form of epilepsy,’ Sheridan explained

‘My life now is better than I could have ever imagined. I’m alive with a beautiful family and a wife that is my best friend,’ he told FEMAIL.

‘I don’t regret anything that has happened to me because if it hadn’t had happened, life wouldn’t be like it is now.’

The couple were overwhelmed with happiness when they found out they would be expecting and their son Dylan, who was born on October 23 last year.

‘The future may have its challenges but we are a family – what ever happens we will face it together, side by side. We are soul mates,’ Sheridan said.  



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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