News, Culture & Society

Adelaide Instagram model claims she was strip searched and ‘treated like a dog’

An Australian tourist who was thrown in a Bali jail after being caught with prescription drugs said she was ‘treated like a dog’ by authorities.

Instagram model Tori Ann Lyla Hunter, 25, spent four days in custody after airport police found drugs including Valium and Dexamphetamine in her luggage as she arrived on the Indonesian island. 

Ms Hunter said she had a medical note for the drugs, but Indonesian Customs denied her claims and said her prescription did not match what she was carrying.

 

Instagram model Tori Ann Lyla Hunter, 25, (pictured) spent four days in custody after authorities at the country’s airport found drugs including Valium and Dexamphetamine in her luggage 

‘They strip searched me. It made me feel very uncomfortable,’ she told A Current Affair.

‘I wanted to let my hair down and instead I got locked up – they treated me like a dog.

‘It’s not as if I’m Schapelle Corby or anything, it was prescription medication.’  

She claimed a legal firm on the island told her she faced five years in jail unless she paid them nearly $39,500 in legal fees. 

Her grandfather claimed an Indonesian legal firm told him to pay the sum in full the next day so that they could arrange her release, and not to speak to the media.

Ms Hunter is now campaigning through a GoFundMe page titled, ‘we were extorted $39,000 for our granddaughter in Bali’ to raise the funds to pay her grandparents back.  

‘She was targeted. We are hoping to raise awareness for those with mental illness travelling with prescription medications,’ the fundraiser reads.

Ms Hunter claimed she had a medical note for the drugs when she entered Bali on August 6

Ms Hunter claimed she had a medical note for the drugs when she entered Bali on August 6

During her four days in detention, Ms Hunter captured images of the cell she was staying in, saying she was given ‘plain bread for dinner like I’m a street dog’.

In other photos she said she would never complain about hotel rooms again after having to use books as a pillow and no blanket.   

Last week, a spokesman for Indonesian Customs in Bali said Ms Hunter was searched on arrival and was found to be carrying the drugs, The Advertiser reported.

But Indonesian Customs denied her claims and said her prescription did not match what she was carrying (note pictured)

But Indonesian Customs denied her claims and said her prescription did not match what she was carrying (note pictured)

Authorities in Bali fired back at Tori Ann Lyla Hunter (pictured), who claims she was arrested at Bali airport and ordered to hand over $40,000 for her freedom

Authorities in Bali fired back at Tori Ann Lyla Hunter (pictured), who claims she was arrested at Bali airport and ordered to hand over $40,000 for her freedom 

While she was carrying a prescription for Diazepam, the customs officer said the chemist document did not align with how much she was carrying.

Diazepam, otherwise known as Valium, is considered to be a Class A narcotic that is only allowed to be transported into Bali by a registered pharmacy holding a specific license.

The spokesman said he ‘rejects her claims she has been making on social media posts’ but did acknowledge that regional police were involved in the investigation.

She shared images of her bed which had no pillow or blanket

Ms Hunter claims she was given plain bread for dinner

Ms Hunter shared pictures from behind bars, where she was given plain bread to eat

Ms Hunter said her luggage contained the medications dexamphetamine to treat her ADHD and Valium for her anxiety and to help her sleep (stock image)

Ms Hunter said her luggage contained the medications dexamphetamine to treat her ADHD and Valium for her anxiety and to help her sleep (stock image)

Ms Hunter said her luggage contained the medications dexamphetamine to treat her ADHD and Valium for her anxiety and to help her sleep (stock image) 

‘We did not ask for money or anything like this at all and we always conduct our business with integrity,’ he said.

‘Here at customs we also do not target people because of their social media status.’

‘We just look at what people bring to ensure they comply with Indonesian regulations on importations.’     

Ms Hunter previoulsy explained to Daily Mail Australia she had valid prescriptions for the medications; using Dexamphetamine to treat her ADHD and Valium for her anxiety and to help her sleep. 

TRAVELLERS SHOULD BE AWARE OF THESE MEDICATIONS

Codeine: Commonly found in pain medicine such as Nurofen Plus.  

Opiods: Such as oxycodone or morphine. 

Pseudoephedrine: A stimulant found in over-the-counter cold tablets. 

Dexamphetamine: Found in ADHD medications.  

Benzodiazepines: Including Valium and Xanax. 

She also had Seroquel to treat her depression related to bi-polar disorder and for the management of borderline personality disorder.  

She claims authorities told her the medications were ‘Class A’ drugs in Indonesia.  

According to the government’s Smarttraveller website, some medications, even if they are prescribed by an Australian doctor, may be considered illegal or a controlled substance overseas. 

‘If you’re caught with illegal medication, you can be detained, fined or face harsher penalties, even if an Australian doctor prescribed the drugs to you. This includes some medications used to treat Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder,’ the Smarttraveller website states. 

The site advises travellers heading to Bali to contact the Indonesian Embassy in Canberra to check if their medication is illegal before they leave. 

Ms Hunter explained to Daily Mail Australia she had valid prescriptions for the medications

Ms Hunter explained to Daily Mail Australia she had valid prescriptions for the medications

The Indonesian Embassy website advises tourists that the Embassy can issue a letter ‘informing that an individual is taking medication while travelling to Indonesia’ but warns this is not a legal document. 

‘The letter is neither for legality purpose nor providing guarantee that you will be exempted from any checks and legal consequences that may arise.’ the Embassy website states.  

‘It will only provide information to Indonesian authorities that an individual is under medication based on the letter of a doctor and the drug prescriptions.’ 

‘Please make sure that the medicines are in original packaging and within the reasonable amount considering the length of stay in Indonesia.’ 

Ms Hunter was also carrying the anti-psychotic Seroquel in her luggage (stock image)

Ms Hunter was also carrying the anti-psychotic Seroquel in her luggage (stock image)

TRAVELLING WITH PRESCRIPTION MEDICATIONS TO BALI

Contact the Indonesian Embassy to find out if your medication is illegal.  

Obtain a letter from the Indonesian embassy by filling out the form on their website.

Return the form with a doctor’s letter and a copy of the prescription that have both been certified by a Justice of the Peace. 

Include a receipt from the pharmacy and copies of your flight itinerary and passport. 

Keep the letter with the medicines.  

Only pack enough medication to last you personally for your stay. 

Keep the medicines in the original packaging. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk