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Ally Langdon’s Parental Attachment: ‘Tiger Parents’ reveal their incredibly high standards

One of Australia’s most controversial parenting styles has been thrust under the spotlight as ‘tiger parents’ Kevin and Debbie reveal how they keep their kids in line. 

Parental Guidance, hosted by mother-of-two Allison Langdon and parenting expert Dr Justin Coulson asks couples with contradicting parenting styles to compete in confronting challenges with their children. 

On Tuesday’s episode, self-confessed ‘tiger parents’ Kevin and Debbie revealed the incredibly high standards they set for their two children, Mimi, 12 and Leo, 10. 

‘Tiger parenting means to be very strict. I always tell my children, I just want to see that you are trying your best,’ Debbie explains. 

The first challenge asked children to make $20 in two hours without the help of their parents, with the tiger kids opting to busk on the side of the road – but the pair savaged their own kids’ performance. 

One of Australia’s most controversial parenting styles has been thrust under the spotlight as ‘Tiger Parents’ Kevin and Debbie (pictured) reveal how they keep their two kids in line

As the pair stand on a street corner, Mimi playing her clarinet and Leo his guitar, their mother stands just a few metres away to critique their performance.

‘The kids didn’t play very well on the street,’ Debbie says while shaking her head, adding she thought they seemed distracted. 

‘The rhythm was not right, the tone was not good and they made many mistakes.’ 

Lara and Andrew, the ‘attachment parents’ appeared shocked at the criticism of the children who they believed had been ‘vulnerable’ busking and played well. 

The first challenge asked children to make $20 in two hours without the help of their parents, with the tiger kids opting to busk on the side of the road (pictured)

The first challenge asked children to make $20 in two hours without the help of their parents, with the tiger kids opting to busk on the side of the road (pictured)

As the pair stand on a street corner, Mimi playing her clarinet and Leo his guitar, their mother stands just a few metres away to critique their performance

As the pair stand on a street corner, Mimi playing her clarinet and Leo his guitar, their mother stands just a few metres away to critique their performance

Helicopter parents Rachel and Sam (pictured) said that if their two daughters had received the same critique they would feel 'deflated'

Helicopter parents Rachel and Sam (pictured) said that if their two daughters had received the same critique they would feel ‘deflated’

Helicopter parents Rachel and Sam said that if their two daughters had received the same critique they would feel ‘deflated’. 

‘We ask them, how do you think you went and how did it feel? Because at the end of the day their fulfilment has to be within themselves, not for us,’ Rachel said.  

Parenting expert Dr Justin Coulson told the tiger parents they had dished out some ‘very strong negative feedback’ at the end of the challenge. 

‘It is important that we have this culture in the family,’ Debbie explains over clips of the couple hovering over the children as they practice their instruments.

‘I like my kids to experience the rewards that come after hard work,’ Kevin agrees. 

Debbie revealed she quit her job in order to stay home and have more time with Mimi, who is currently preparing for a piano scholarship. 

'It is important that we have this culture in the family,' Debbie explains over clips of the couple hovering over the children as they practice their instruments (pictured)

‘It is important that we have this culture in the family,’ Debbie explains over clips of the couple hovering over the children as they practice their instruments (pictured)

Debbie revealed she quit her job in order to stay home and have more time with Mimi (pictured) who is currently preparing for a piano scholarship

Debbie revealed she quit her job in order to stay home and have more time with Mimi (pictured) who is currently preparing for a piano scholarship

‘I demand consistent practice every day, it’s like rowing a boat, if you stop you go back,’ she says. 

Rob and Sioux, the ‘discipline’ parents said the tiger parenting style went a step beyond how they would personally keep their children in line. 

‘Our boys would not cope,’ Sioux says. 

‘When it stops becoming fun, that’s when you need to reassess what you’re doing.’ 

Allison Langdon then asked the tiger parents if they thought their two children were scared of disappointing them at times. 

‘They are not, because they still disappoint me,’ Debbie fires back. 

Allison Langdon (pictured) asked the tiger parents if they thought their two children were scared of disappointing them at times

Allison Langdon (pictured) asked the tiger parents if they thought their two children were scared of disappointing them at times 

Rob and Sioux, the 'Discipline Parents' (pictured) said the tiger parenting style went a step beyond how they would personally keep their children in line

Rob and Sioux, the ‘Discipline Parents’ (pictured) said the tiger parenting style went a step beyond how they would personally keep their children in line 

‘To be honest, we know a lot of similar tiger parents and in terms of intensity we are pretty average,’ Kevin admitted, prompting shocked laughter from other couples. 

A second challenge in Tuesday’s episode asked children to face their fears by jumping off a high rock into a swimming pool below. 

Dr Justin Coulson said the parenting styles that allowed children to feel their fear and jump anyway would do the best in this particular test. 

He said some parents would struggle to strike the balance between pushing their children too much or not hard enough. 

As ten-year-old Leo neared the edge of the rock he is heard telling his mother he can’t swim and fears he will drown. 

‘You can swim 25 metres just not very beautifully,’ Debbie retorts, telling the camera that as tiger parents they think it important their kids always try their best. 

As ten-year-old Leo neared the edge of the rock he is heard telling his mother he can't swim and fears he will drown (pictured)

As ten-year-old Leo neared the edge of the rock he is heard telling his mother he can’t swim and fears he will drown (pictured)

A second challenge in Tuesday's episode asked children to face their fears by jumping off a high rock into a swimming pool below

A second challenge in Tuesday’s episode asked children to face their fears by jumping off a high rock into a swimming pool below

Leo is heard laughing nervously as his family counts him down from five before finally jumping from the ledge into the water (pictured)

Leo is heard laughing nervously as his family counts him down from five before finally jumping from the ledge into the water (pictured)

Leo is heard laughing nervously as his family counts him down from five before finally jumping from the ledge into the water.

Allison asks his mother how she thought Leo felt after he completed the challenge. 

‘He was so happy, he had overcome his fear,’ his proud mother replied. 

Tiger parenting is a strict and authoritative method of parenting that is meant to raise high-achieving and successful children. 

Children raised under tiger parenting methods are taught to get used to working hard from a young age and practice self discipline into adulthood. 

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