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American expat shares the strangest words he’d never heard before moving to Australia

American expat shares the ‘strange’ words and phrases he’d never heard before moving to Australia – including ‘day for it’ and ‘sanga’

  • Adam Foskey moved from Georgia in the US to Melbourne, Australia, this year
  • The American has shared a video on TikTok talking about the oddest phrases
  • He didn’t know what a ‘dibber dobber’ was or what a ‘trapezium’ shape was
  • Many of his followers have pointed out his pronunciation of ‘sanga’ was wrong 


An American expat has shared some of the strangest words he learned when he first touched down in Australia, including what locals say to refer to a sandwich and a liar.

Adam Foskey took to TikTok on Wednesday and revealed some of his favourite Aussie phrases, many of which he is happy to use instead of the equivalent said in the USA.

‘First up, we have the term “dibber dobber”, which I’d just refer to as a “tattletale”. It’s just someone who snitches on you,’ Adam explained in the video. 

'First up, we have the term "dibber dobber", which I'd just refer to as a "tattletale". It's just someone who snitches on you,' Adam explained in the video

Adam Foskey took to TikTok on Wednesday and revealed some of his favourite Aussie phrases, many of which he is happy to use instead of the equivalent said in the USA

‘I think I prefer dibber dobber better because I like the way it rhymes.’

According to Urban Dictionary a ‘dibber dobber’ is someone – often considered immature – who ‘tells on’ or ‘squeals’ on other people for doing something considered forbidden.  

It’s a phrase that is often used in Australian schools rather than in the workplace but is still well-known right across the nation. 

‘Next up we have a trapezium which I would call a “trapezoid” and I’ve researched these further and to be honest I’m still confused about all of it,’ Adam said.

According to Urban Dictionary a 'dibber dobber' is someone - often considered immature - who 'tells on' or 'squeals' on other people for doing something considered forbidden

According to Urban Dictionary a ‘dibber dobber’ is someone – often considered immature – who ‘tells on’ or ‘squeals’ on other people for doing something considered forbidden

A trapezium is a quadrilateral shape with one pair of parallel opposite sides. It’s often found featured in common math problems and learnt in Australian primary schools.

‘Next up we have the term “day for it” which just means it’s a great day to be doing the current activity you’re doing or planning on doing on that day,’ he said.

Comedians The Inspired Unemployed use the phrase often to describe having a great day to their fans and it has quickly become a common slang term.

‘Also lastly we have referring to a sandwich as “sanga”. I’ve said it before ya’ll know I love these shortened words so this is definitely something I can get behind,’ he said.

'Also lastly we have referring to a sandwich as "sanga". I've said it before ya'll know I love these shortened words so this is definitely something I can get behind,' he said

‘Also lastly we have referring to a sandwich as “sanga”. I’ve said it before ya’ll know I love these shortened words so this is definitely something I can get behind,’ he said

Despite there being a ‘g’ in the shortened phrase it’s not pronounced with a strong ‘g’, something Adam mistakenly did in his TikTok.

‘The way you pronounced sanga makes me think you’ve never heard someone say it out loud,’ one comment read.

‘It’s a soft g on the sanga mate,’ said another.

A third added: ‘Please don’t say sanga out loud unless you’re in a hillbilly town’. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk