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Aussie schoolboy, eight, reveals how he enlisted Billie Eilish to help save the Great Barrier Reef

Aussie schoolboy Elijah Richardson, eight, reveals how he enlisted singer Billie Eilish to help save the Great Barrier Reef


A young environmentalist has enlisted none other than pop star Billie Eilish to help save the Great Barrier Reef.

Aussie schoolboy Elijah Richardson, eight, has been campaigning since 2020 for CoralWatch – a non-profit organisation that’s dedicated to reef conservation.

Appearing on Weekend Today on Sunday, Elijah revealed how he reached out to the singer, 19, ‘about a year ago’.

Worthy cause: Aussie boy Elijah Richardson (right), eight, revealed on Weekend Today on Sunday how he enlisted Billie Eilish to help save the Great Barrier Reef with the CoralWatch campaign. Pictured left are Weekend Today hosts Richard Wilkins and Jayne Azzopardi 

‘About a year ago I messaged Billie Eilish to use her music to try and get more people involved in saving the Great Barrier Reef,’ Elijah told hosts Richard Wilkins and Jayne Azzopardi.

‘Somehow it got to her eventually and she said yes,’ he continued.

Elijah and CoralWatch also penned an open letter to Billie in October, where they asked for use of her song Ocean Eyes as well as show an interest in their campaign.

‘Will you come join our watch? Not physically… we’d just love you to Zoom or FaceTime… just let us know by email,’ Elijah and his fellow environmentalists asked in the clip.  

Getting her attention: Elijah revealed how he reached out to the singer, 19, 'about a year ago' and penned an open letter in October this year, asking to use her song Ocean Eyes in the campaign, to which she eventually said yes. Billie is pictured earlier this month

Getting her attention: Elijah revealed how he reached out to the singer, 19, ‘about a year ago’ and penned an open letter in October this year, asking to use her song Ocean Eyes in the campaign, to which she eventually said yes. Billie is pictured earlier this month 

Asked by hosts Richard and Jayne as to why he’s so passionate about the reef, Elijah responded: ‘The Great Barrier Reef to me is like a whole new world. It’s just got so many new creatures and all the creatures depend on the Great Barrier Reef.

‘If the Great Barrier Reef dies all those creatures that depend on the Great Barrier Reef will die too,’ he continued. 

Based from The University of Queensland, CoralWatch aims ‘to create public understanding of the value of reefs and provides opportunities to actively help save the reef through participation in scientific research and education’.

Billie previously revealed she wants to use her platform to ‘make a difference’.

Reaching out: Elijah and CoralWatch also penned an open letter to Billie in October, where they asked for use of her song Ocean Eyes as well as show an interest in their campaign

Reaching out: Elijah and CoralWatch also penned an open letter to Billie in October, where they asked for use of her song Ocean Eyes as well as show an interest in their campaign 

Young environmentalist: Asked by hosts Richard and Jayne as to why he's so passionate about the reef, Elijah responded: 'The Great Barrier Reef to me is like a whole new world. It's just got so many new creatures and all the creatures depend on the Great Barrier Reef'

Young environmentalist: Asked by hosts Richard and Jayne as to why he’s so passionate about the reef, Elijah responded: ‘The Great Barrier Reef to me is like a whole new world. It’s just got so many new creatures and all the creatures depend on the Great Barrier Reef’

The American singer, who rose to fame at age 17 with her debut album When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?, told Vogue Australia in 2019 that she can ‘do more’.

‘I really don’t want to waste my platform. I’m trying not to but I think all of us in the spotlight — or whatever you want to call it — can be more vocal about climate change and things that need to be talked about,’ she said.

‘I still think I can do more. There are so many things being determined by people who are going to die soon anyway because they’re old as f***. It makes me so angry.’

She continued: ‘There are so many things I wish I could snap my fingers and make better. There is so much that needs help and people who pretend they care and don’t and people who could do something, but don’t. I’m here and I can actually try.’ 

Using fame for good: The American singer, who rose to fame at age 17 with her debut album When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?, told Vogue Australia in 2019 that she wants to use her platform to 'make a difference'. Pictured in September

Using fame for good: The American singer, who rose to fame at age 17 with her debut album When We All Fall Asleep, Where Do We Go?, told Vogue Australia in 2019 that she wants to use her platform to ‘make a difference’. Pictured in September

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk