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Australian brand launches sell-out top that can be worn more than FIFTEEN different ways

The must-have shirt of 2020: Label launches sell-out top that can be worn more than FIFTEEN different ways – and it’s less than $100

  • Adelaide fashion label releases High Times Shirt that can be worn multiple ways 
  • Originally launched in 2015, the Harvey The Label outfit is still super popular 
  • Head designer Mim Harvey says all her designs are created with versatility
  • ‘My outfits are designed for real, everyday women,’ she said  

An Australian fashion brand has released a stylish, versatile shirt that can be worn more than fifteen different ways to suit various occasions and seasons. 

Mim Harvey, head designer of Harvey The Label, said the $99.95 High Times Multiway Shirt is one of the brand’s ‘core collection pieces’ and was first released in 2015 when the brand launched.

Since then the sell-out shirt continues to be a customer favourite, along with many of the Adelaide-based brand’s other multiway pieces including the Stone Jumpsuit. 

‘My outfits are designed for real, everyday women and the versatile style encourages customers to experiment and get creative with their looks,’ she said.  

'My outfits are designed for real, everyday women and the versatility encourages customers to experiment and get creative with their looks,' Mim said

The High Times Multiway Shirt is one of Harvey The Label’s ‘core collection pieces’ and was first released in 2015. The shirt is sold in two colours but both are currently sold out 

While it may seem staggering to think one shirt can be worn so many different ways, the garment is super easy to style due to the clever design and lightweight fabric.  

Some options including tying up the front fabric at either the front or back, flipping the outfit back to front and wearing backless, tucking in the collar to create an off the shoulder look, and the list goes on. 

Like the High Times Shirt, each Harvey The Label outfit is designed with versatility in mind to allow the looks to be worn by women of all shapes and sizes.  

‘I want to make women feel confident and comfortable in their own skin – my multiway designs are all about having fun and experimenting with the outfits to suit you,’ Mim explained.  

Mim describes the label as ‘slow fashion’ with only 50 garments of each piece produced, adding a sense of exclusivity. 

   

Multiway is the way to go to avoid constantly buying new outfits. Some wearable options for the High Times Shirt include tying the front fabric at either the front or back (pictured above)

Multiway is the way to go to avoid constantly buying new outfits. Some wearable options for the High Times Shirt include tying the front fabric at either the front or back (pictured above)

Another alternate option is to tie the sleeves around the waist and wear as a half-dress over another outfit (pictured above)

Another alternate option is to tie the sleeves around the waist and wear as a half-dress over another outfit (pictured above) 

The brand also received praise in September 2018 and was invited to show their collection in New York Fashion Week’s Fashion Palette, capturing the attention of global brands such as The Iconic.

‘It was such an incredible experience! It really showed other major labels that we’re not just a small pop-up brand,’ Mim said. 

From originally starting out at small markets around the city to now having their own residency store in the east end of Adelaide, Mim is excited to continue growing the brand and designing more outfits. 

Other multiway pieces include the Stone Jumpsuit, the Paloma Playsuit, the Florence Tiered Dress and the Aria Button Up Dress.  

Due to high amounts of customer requests, the High Times Shirt is also sold in black but is currently sold-out. 

Due to high amounts of customer requests, the High Times Multiway Shirt is also sold in black but is currently sold-out

Due to high amounts of customer requests, the High Times Multiway Shirt is also sold in black but is currently sold-out

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk