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Australia’s most foul-mouthed state is revealed as a study investigates use of bad language 

Survey names Australia’s most foul-mouthed state – and reveals which gender uses foul language the most

  • Oral-B conducted the survey as part of their ‘Clean Up You Mouth Campaign’ 
  • The most foul-mouthed state was SA, with 29 per cent swearing 16 times a day 
  • WA swore the least with 54 per cent stating they swear less than five times a day

The most foul-mouthed state in Australia has been revealed after a new survey investigated the use of bad language.

Dental brand Oral-B surveyed swearing within each state as part of its ‘Clean Up Your Mouth Campaign’.

The survey found South Australia was the most potty-mouthed state with 29 per cent of residents swearing more than 16 times per day.  

West Australians on the other hand used foul language less, with 54 per cent of residents swearing fewer than five times a day. 

Dental brand Oral-B surveyed swearing within each state as part of its ‘Clean Up Your Mouth Campaign’ (stock image)

The survey concluded the average Australian swore around seven times per day with men swearing more than women. 

Australians don’t swear to offend but instead, 54 per cent use foul language as a means to relieve tension.

While 24 per cent use swear words for comedic effect. 

The number one cause of swearing was driving, with 41 per cent of Australians said they swore behind the wheel. 

The second major cause was household chores, as 34 per cent said they swore while cleaning. 

The third cause while arguing with partners, with 32 per cent stating they used bad language during heated discussions.  

Other swear-inducing activities were browsing social media, watching the news, or working.  

The survey found South Australia was the most potty-mouthed state with 29 per cent of residents swearing more than 16 time per day (pictured: Adelaide in South Australia)

The survey found South Australia was the most potty-mouthed state with 29 per cent of residents swearing more than 16 time per day (pictured: Adelaide in South Australia)

‘Swearing has many different functions, it can be used to signal frustration, to emphasise emotion, or to show solidarity,’ Senior Lecturer in Linguistics at Macquarie University Dr Nick Wilson told 7News. 

‘People have different viewpoints on swearing depending on their age and background. 

‘For some people it is part of their identity, for others it is deeply offensive.’

YouGov and Oral-B Australia have been contacted for comment. 

While West Australians rarely used foul language with 54 per cent of residents swearing less than five times a day (pictured: Perth in Western Australia)

While West Australians rarely used foul language with 54 per cent of residents swearing less than five times a day (pictured: Perth in Western Australia)

SWEAR SURVEY RESULTS 

Overall results: 

  • 29 per cent of South Australians swore more than 16 times a day. 
  • 54 per cent of West Australians said they swore less than five times a day. 
  • The average Australian swore around seven times a day. 
  • Men swore more than women. 
  • 54 per cent swear to relieve tension. 
  • 24 per cent swear for comedic effect. 

Major causes: 

  • The number one cause of swearing was driving, with 41 per cent stating they swore behind the wheel. 
  • The second cause was household chores, with 32 per cent stating they swore while cleaning. 
  • The third cause was arguing with partners, with 32 per cent of Australian’s swearing during a heated discussion. 
  • Other major swear-inducing activities were watching the news, browsing social media, or while at work. 

Source: Clean Up Your Mouth Campaign 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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