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Australia’s top 10 highest earning professions are revealed… so do any of them surprise you? 

Unsurprisingly, some of the country’s highest taxable incomes come from people with the most years spent studying. 

Financial dealers, surgeons and engineer managers are among the top 10 highest earning professions in Australia with taxable incomes of almost $400,000.

Surgeons topped the chart with a salary of $393,467 who were just in front of anaesthetists with $359,056 and internal medicine specialists with $291,140, according to the 2015-16 Tax Stats.  

Financial dealers, surgeons and engineer managers are among the top 10 highest earning professions in Australia with taxable incomes of almost $400,000 (stock image)

Legal practitioners came it with $198,216, mining engineers on $166,557 (stock image), chief executives on $158,249 and engineering managers with $148,852 were among top ten jobs

Legal practitioners came it with $198,216, mining engineers on $166,557 (stock image), chief executives on $158,249 and engineering managers with $148,852 were among top ten jobs

‘Perhaps unsurprisingly, the medical profession does dominate the top income categories,’ Australian Taxation Office second commissioner Andrew Mills told news.com.au. 

The remaining six top jobs earning more than $200,000 were financial Dealers with taxable salaries of $263,309, followed by psychiatrists with $211,024, other medical practitioners on $211,024.

Those scooping up less than $200,000 were legal practitioners with $198,216, mining engineers on $166,557, chief executives on $158,249 and engineering managers with $148,852.

Australia’s highest earning professions 

1. Surgeons $393,467

2. Anaesthetists $359,056

3. Internal Medicine Specialists – $291,140

4. Financial Dealers – $263,309

5. Psychiatrists – $211,024

6. Other medical practitioners – $211,024

7. Legal practitioners – $198,219

8. Mining Engineers – $166,557

9. Chief Executives and Managing Directors – $158,249

10. Engineering Managers – $148,852 

Source:  2015-16 Tax Stats 

The salaries are a snapshot of about 16 million income tax returns made up of about 13.5million people and almost 1200 different occupations recorded.

Less than 100 of the occupations including beauticians, teachers and goat farmers were held by women who had higher than average taxable incomes than men, the publication reported.

The richest and poorest suburbs in Australia were also revealed by the ATO. 

Sitting at peak position in the 2015-16 stats is Sydney’s 2027 postcode, which covers the coveted eastern suburbs of Darling Point, Edgecliff and Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull’s local Point Piper.

The average taxable income for that area was a cool $192,500 – the topmost in Australia.

At the bottom end of the ladder are the north-eastern New South Wales suburbs of Bulyeroi and Rowena, both covered by the 2387 postcode and grossing an average salary of $12,004.

Data released by the Australian Taxation Office has also revealed the richest and poorest suburbs in the country, with Sydney suburb Point Piper's 2027 postcode coming in at the top

Data released by the Australian Taxation Office has also revealed the richest and poorest suburbs in the country, with Sydney suburb Point Piper’s 2027 postcode coming in at the top

Many of the top and bottom postcodes were across NSW and Victoria with only a few in Queensland (pictured)

Many of the top and bottom postcodes were across NSW and Victoria with only a few in Queensland (pictured)

Suburbs on the bottom end of the ladder included Bulyeroi and Rowena, both in New South Wales, and Watchem in Victoria (pictured)

Suburbs on the bottom end of the ladder included Bulyeroi and Rowena, both in New South Wales, and Watchem in Victoria (pictured)

The richest and poorest postcodes were both located in New South Wales

The richest and poorest postcodes were both located in New South Wales, while the second-highest and second-lowest both located in Victoria

 ATO second commissioner Andrew Mills said it was 'unsurprising that the eastern suburbs of Sydney dominate the postcodes'

 ATO second commissioner Andrew Mills said it was ‘unsurprising that the eastern suburbs of Sydney dominate the postcodes’

Those figures were gathered from a total 5995 taxpayers in the top postcode, and 135 in the lowest.

Victoria, comparatively, was home to the second-highest and second-lowest income areas – split between the Watchem and Morton Plains postcode of 3482 and the Brim postcode of 3391, respectively.

The state also had five out of the bottom 10 postcodes. 

He also cautioned against reading too far into these kind of statistics, however, as there could sometimes be ‘odd things happening’. 

Australia’s highest incomes by postcode 

• $192,500 — 2027 (NSW: Darling Point, Edgecliff, Point Piper)

• $190,777 — 3142 (Victoria: Hawksburn, Toorak)

• $182,829 — 2030 (NSW: Dover Heights, Rose Bay North and  Vaucluse)

• $180,412 — 2023 (NSW: Bellevue Hill)

• $167,266 — 3944 (Victoria: Portsea)

• $161,360 — 2088 (NSW: Mosman, Spit Junction)

• $159,736 — 2063 (NSW: Northbridge)

• $150,230 — 6011 (Western Australia: Cottesloe, Peppermint Grove)

• $147,757 — 2110 (NSW: Hunters Hill, Woolwich)

• $146,521 — 2028 (NSW: Double Bay) 

Australia’s lowest incomes by postcode 

• $12,004 — 2387 (NSW: Bulyeroi, Rowena)

• $15,411 — 3482 (Victoria: Watchem, Watchem West, Morton Plains)

• $18,291 — 4732 (Queensland: Tablederry, Muttaburra)

• $21,540 — 3889 (Victoria: Errinundra, Manorina, Club Terrace)

• $22,119 — 2308 (NSW: Newcastle University, Callaghan)

• $22,520 — 3542 (Victoria: NSW: Tittybong, Cokum, Lalbert)

• $23,641 — 2386 (NSW: Burren Junction, Nowley, Drildool)

• $23,881 — 5306 (South Australia: Wynarka)

• $24,261 — 3391 (Victoria: Brim)

• $24,641 — 3237 (Victoria: Weeaproinah, Wyelangta, Yuulong)

Only one Queensland postcode made the bottom 10 - a stark contrast to the seven out of 10 in the previous year's stats 

Only one Queensland postcode made the bottom 10 – a stark contrast to the seven out of 10 in the previous year’s stats 



Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


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