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Autistic boy and Wiggles fan has a seizure when he meets them – what came next will warm your heart 

Autistic boy who had been looking forward to meeting the Wiggles has a seizure when it was finally his turn for a photo – what happened next will move you

  • Renee Baker took her autistic and intellectually disabled son to meet the Wiggles
  • Unfortunately 14-year-old Jackson Baker had a seizure before he met them
  • The Wiggles sat with Jackson, giving him extra attention, impressing his mother

Australian icons The Wiggles have earned a mother’s praise after their kind treatment of an intellectually disabled and autistic boy who became ill on meeting them.

Jackson Baker, 14, had a seizure as he was due to meet members of The Wiggles backstage in Canberra before the show, just as it was his turn to walk up and meet the band.

‘He was with about 70 kids and mums waiting and he was anxious about what was happening,’ Jackson’s dedicated mum Renee Baker told Daily Mail Australia.

Autistic and intellectually-disabled boy Jackson Baker (front left) is pictured with The Wiggles at a recent gig where the band members spoke with him as he came out of a seizure. Purple Wiggle Lachy (back right) is an ambassador for Epilepsy Action Australia

Renee Baker (pictured front right with Jackson) was impressed The Wiggles took plenty of time and were compassionate with her son when he had an absent seizure during a recent meet and greet

Renee Baker (pictured front right with Jackson) was impressed The Wiggles took plenty of time and were compassionate with her son when he had an absent seizure during a recent meet and greet

‘He stood up and went into an absent seizure, which means he was not with it – just staring.’ 

Jackson has refractory epilepsy, which is drug-resistant, and has multiple types of seizures – at the moment on a daily basis.

‘He lost body tone and his legs went wobbly, he was unable to walk, so I had to sit him back down,’ Mrs Baker said.

‘The fact The Wiggles noticed straight away and ran over and all stood around him and tried to comfort him, that really impressed me, there was a lot of kindness.’

‘My goodness they are beautiful caring people.’ 

‘It was a massive struggle for me not to burst into tears at that point.’

Purple Wiggle, Lachlan Gillespie, was especially attentive.

‘He could see what was happening, he said ‘oh he’s having a seizure’ and he stayed with us. He was very compassionate with Jackson and myself too.’ 

Purple Wiggle Lachlan 'Lachy' Gillespie spent extra time with Jackson Baker as he came out of his seizure

Purple Wiggle Lachlan ‘Lachy’ Gillespie spent extra time with Jackson Baker as he came out of his seizure

Renee and son Jackson Baker at their recent Wiggles concert experience in Canberra

Renee and son Jackson Baker at their recent Wiggles concert experience in Canberra

Mr Gillespie, whose brother and niece have epilepsy, is an ambassador for Epilepsy Action Australia. Purple is also the colour of epilepsy week.

Ironically, Jackson’s severe intellectual disability means he isn’t withdrawn from strangers as some people with autism can appear – though he cannot recognise famous people.

‘I don’t think he understood they were famous, to him they were brightly-dressed and fun people.’

‘I’m just grateful they were so kind towards by gorgeous boy Jackson.’

Mrs Baker also posted her photos to Facebook Group The Kindness Pandemic, where she, Jackson and The Wiggles received many positive comments. 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk