News, Culture & Society

Autumn Veatch talks life since plane crash two years ago

Autumn Veatch survived a plane crash that killed her step-grandparents two years ago in Washington’s Cascade Mountains.

And the deaths of Leland, 62, and Sharon Bowman, 63, – who were trapped in the plane on July 11, 2015 – has caused the now 18-year-old to feel responsible.

‘I’m not sure what type of closure I could have,’ she said to KIRO 7. 

‘My stepgrandparents aren’t alive anymore and I feel like it is my fault, I almost died.’

Autumn Veatch survived a plane crash that killed her step-grandparents two years ago in Washington’s Cascade Mountains

But the deaths of Leland, 62, and Sharon Bowman, 63, - who were trapped in the plane on July 11, 2015 - has caused the now 18-year-old to feel responsible

But the deaths of Leland, 62, and Sharon Bowman, 63, – who were trapped in the plane on July 11, 2015 – has caused the now 18-year-old to feel responsible

Autumn, of Bellingham, was flying with her step-grandparents from Kalispell, Montana to Lynden, Washington when their small plane crashed in a mountainous area of Okanogan County.

And according to Autumn, the change in plan from her driving back to her instead flying back is the reason she blames herself for the now inevitable.

She added:’They were flying me back. They would not have died if they were not flying me back or if I had followed the original plan and just driven back. 

‘I know it is not rational to blame myself but technically that’s true and it sucks to live with that.’

According to Autumn, the change in plan from her driving back to her instead flying back is the reason she blames herself for the now inevitable

According to Autumn, the change in plan from her driving back to her instead flying back is the reason she blames herself for the now inevitable

She added:'They were flying me back. They would not have died if they were not flying me back or if I had followed the original plan and just driven back'

She added:’They were flying me back. They would not have died if they were not flying me back or if I had followed the original plan and just driven back’

Autumn was rescued after she used her knowledge from watching survival shows to find her way to a trail-head where she waived down a car.

That driver took her to nearby Mazama, Washington where she told police the tragic story of the plane crash, which search and rescue teams have yet to find.

She survived with just a few minor injuries but the traumatic experience has left her not wanting to be associated with the name. 

She survived with just a few minor injuries (pictured with her favorite food chicken nuggets which were brought to her room in the hospital) but the traumatic experience has left her not wanting to be associated with the name

She survived with just a few minor injuries (pictured with her favorite food chicken nuggets which were brought to her room in the hospital) but the traumatic experience has left her not wanting to be associated with the name

‘Just since the plane crash it is hard for me to be associated with the name Autumn because people recognize my name and pry for information and it makes me really uncomfortable,’ said the girl who now goes by aliases on social media to prevent the constant questions. 

‘It is just easier to have an alias so people don’t try to always contact me.’ 

Autumn went to finish her junior year at Bellingham High School but soon dropped out during her senior year because of the constant attention she was getting. 

She added: ‘I try to not blame people for being curious because I would want to know the story too. 

Autumn went to finish her junior year at Bellingham High School but soon dropped out during her senior year because of the constant attention she was getting. She said: 'I try to not blame people for being curious because I would want to know the story too
Autumn went to finish her junior year at Bellingham High School but soon dropped out during her senior year because of the constant attention she was getting. She said: 'I try to not blame people for being curious because I would want to know the story too

Autumn went to finish her junior year at Bellingham High School but soon dropped out during her senior year because of the constant attention she was getting. She said: ‘I try to not blame people for being curious because I would want to know the story too

‘It is uncomfortable. It was traumatic. I don’t like to think about it a lot but I can see that the story has value to the people who are trying to recover and have stuff they are going through.

‘It was horrible. There wasn’t really anything that is good that has come of it. 

But even with all the heartbreak, Autumn still finds an occasional dose of humor when dealing with people today.

‘People actually invite me to go hiking — and I’m like, “Why would I ever want to do that with you?” I don’t want to go camping. I don’t want to go hiking. I don’t want to do any of that crap,’ Autumn said.

The teen, who worked on a book with Tara Ellis called ‘Getting Out Alive: The Autumn Veatch Story,’ likes art and fashion and one day may go to fashion school. 

She is afraid of flying and does not go into the woods but Amanda is hopeful that one day her life will find some form of balance.  

‘I just hope that I can find peace with myself and be happy and content,’ the teen added. 

‘Just comfortable with who I am. I haven’t quite found that piece yet but I know that I will.’ 

Read more at DailyMail.co.uk


Comments are closed.